Juha-Pekka Nuutinen

Tampere University of Technology, Tammerfors, Province of Western Finland, Finland

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Publications (10)23.85 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Inion(®) Free Form Plate is a newly designed biodegradable plate. After drilling through the plate and tapping, a biodegradable screw can be inserted, followed by removal of the screw head. As an alternative a countersink screw can be used. Aim of the study was to compare the mechanical properties of the 1.4 mm Free Form Plate with the 2.0 mm conventional shaped plate. Mechanical testing of the plate pullout strength was conducted for the Inion(®) Free Form Plate fixed with an Inion OTPS™ 2.0 × 20 mm Screw. In addition, the failure mode was reported. Overlapping confidence levels were found with regard to the yield load, first peak load and maximum load, when comparing the Free Form Plate and the conventional 4-hole plate. The Free Form Plate fixed with a screw with head and countersink showed the highest stability at maximum load. The results of the mechanical stability testing showed no significant differences between the tested plates. The main failure mode was a failure of the screw shaft. The results of the current investigation imply that the 1.4 mm Free Form Plate could be used as an alternative to the 2.0 mm conventional shaped plate.
    Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery 04/2010; 38(7):517-21. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Inion FreedomPlate, a "free-form" osteosynthesis plate, is a biodegradable plate with just pilot holes for drilling. The construction of the plate allows the surgeon a placement of screws in optimal position. The screw heads can either be countersunk into the plate or cut off. Furthermore, the plate can be cut and contoured to match the bone. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanical properties of the Inion FreedomPlate compared to a conventional biodegradable plate. Acrylic pipes were fixed together with plates and screws. Tensile and cantilever bending tests were performed to measure the fixation properties. In the tensile test, the samples were loaded with a constant speed of 5 mm/min until failure of fixation. The yield load, maximum failure load, and initial stiffness were recorded, and the failure mode was visually determined. In the cantilever bending test, the samples were loaded with a constant speed of 50 mm/min (with a moment arm of 45 mm) until failure of fixation. The yield bending moment and initial stiffness were recorded, and the failure mode was determined. The results of the study show that the new free-form plate provides at least as strong fixation as the tested conventional biodegradable plate. No clinically relevant difference was found between free-form plates fixed with into-the-plate countersunk screws and those fixed with screws without heads.
    Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology 07/2008; 106(4):477-82. · 1.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biodegradable urethral stents have been in clinical use for more than 10 years. To solve the problems connected with the helical spiral configuration of the stents used to date we developed a new tubular mesh configuration and evaluated the biocompatibility properties and degradation time of 2 differently braided stents in the rabbit urethra. The biodegradable, self-expanding stents were made of self-reinforced polylactic acid polymer blended with BaSO4 (Alfa Chem, Kings Point, New York). Two braiding patterns, namely a diamond 1/1 and a regular 2/2 + 1 (Prodesco, Perkasie, Pennsylvania), were used to produce a tubular mesh configuration. Stainless steel stents with 1/1 braiding served as controls. The stents were inserted into the posterior urethra of 36 male rabbits. The animals were sacrificed after 1 week, 1 month, 6 months or 12 months. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analyses were done. Tissue reactions to operative trauma were seen in all specimens at week 1. The changes gradually abated in the biodegradable stent groups, whereas chronic inflammatory changes and fibrosis were increasingly seen with metallic stents after 6 months. Epithelial hyperplasia increased with time for all stent types and materials. As expected, stent fragmentation started at 6 months. Biodegradable polymers are suitable materials for braided urethral stents. However, the braided configuration of the stent with a decreased mass of material does not prevent the development of epithelial hyperplasia. The biodegradable, self-expanding, braided stents functioned well in the rabbit urethra and are suitable for clinical studies.
    The Journal of Urology 01/2006; 174(6):2401-4. · 3.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Bioabsorbable stents may offer advantages for the treatment of benign and malignant biliary strictures, including large stent diameter, decreased biofilm accumulation and proliferative changes, elimination of the need for stent removal and imaging artifacts, and prospects for drug impregnation. However, suboptimal expansion has hampered prior iterations. A new bioabsorbable biliary stent (BioStent) was evaluated in a porcine model. BioStents were placed in 8 animals for long-term follow-up. The following were evaluated: accuracy and ease of delivery and deployment, radial expansion, and radiologic visualization. Stent function and biotolerance were assessed by cholangiography, serum bilirubin, and necropsy for histopathology performed in pairs at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months. Stents were delivered without sphincterotomy and were deployed easily, accurately, and with good immediate stent expansion and radiographic visualization. On follow-up, all stents were fully expanded and serum bilirubin levels remained within the normal range. Although there was no clinical evidence of biliary obstruction, filling defects were common at cholangiography. On histopathologic evaluation, there was neither bile duct integration or proliferative change. The BioStent bioabsorbable biliary stent, modified with axial runners, can be effectively deployed endoscopically, is self-expanding, is visualized radiographically, and remains patent up to 6 months. There was no bile duct integration or proliferative change, which are potential advantages. Stent occlusion and migration remain concerns.
    Gastrointestinal Endoscopy 12/2003; 58(5):777-84. · 5.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Biodegradable spiral urethral stents have been used with favorable results combined with thermal treatments of the prostate and for recurrent urethral strictures but the configuration of the helical spiral is not ideal. We developed a new tubular mesh configuration for the biodegradable urethral stent and evaluated its expansion and locking properties in the rabbit urethra. The stents were made of self-reinforced polylactic acid polymer (Bionx Implants, Ltd., Tampere, Finland) blended with BaSO (Alfa Chem, New York, New York) to achieve radiopacity. Two braiding patterns, that is 1 over 1 and 2 over 2 + 1, were used to produce a tubular mesh structure. Stainless steel stents (pattern 1 over 1) served as controls. The stents were inserted into the posterior urethra of 27 male rabbits. The animals were sacrificed after 1 week, 1 and 6 months, respectively. X-rays were done immediately after stent insertion and at sacrifice. Longitudinal movement and expansion were assessed on the x-rays.(4) All stents maintained position in the urethra without fixation. Macroscopic disorientation of the structure of the 2 over 2 + 1 braided self-reinforced polylactic acid polymer stents began before 1 month, while 1 over 1 braided stents retained their construction. At 6 months 3 of 6 biodegradable stents were degraded. Average longitudinal movement was 2 mm. (range 1 to 3) in the 1 over 1 self-reinforced polylactic acid polymer group, 2 mm. (range 0 to 7) in the 2 over 2 + 1 polylactic acid group and 3 mm. (range 3 to 3) in controls at 1 month. Biodegradable polymers are suitable materials for braided urethral stents. The expansion properties of the 2 braiding models tested in this study sufficed to fix the stents in situ in the prostatic urethra. However, the 1 over 1 braiding pattern was superior to the 2 over 2 + 1 pattern, in that it retained its macroscopic construction until the degradation of single self-reinforced polylactic acid polymer fibers.
    The Journal of Urology 04/2003; 169(3):1171-4. · 3.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanical and self-expansion properties of braided bioabsorbable stents. In total four different stents were manufactured from PLLA fibres using a braiding technique. The changes in radial pressure stiffness and diameter recovery of the stents were determined initially, and after insertion and release from a delivery device. The braided stents were compared to three commercially available metallic braided stents. The changes in physical and mechanical properties of the PLLA fibres and stents during in vitro degradation were investigated. After release from the delivery device, the PLLA stents did not fully recover to their original diameter. The radial pressure stiffness of the bioabsorbable stents was similar to that of the metallic stents. The in vitro degradation study showed that the stents would keep at least half of their initial radial pressure stiffness for more than 22 weeks.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2003; 14(3):255-66. · 1.70 Impact Factor
  • Juha-Pekka Nuutinen, Claude Clerc, Pertti Törmälä
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the radiopaque filler, barium sulfate (BaSO4), on the mechanical properties of self-reinforced bioresorbable fibres. The bioresorbable polymer was a copolymer of L- and D-lactide with an L/D monomer ratio of 96:4 (96L/4D PLA). The fibres were manufactured using an extrusion and a drawing process. Three different methods of processing the composites were studied. The materials were blended prior to extrusion. In the first method, the BaSO4 powder was mixed with the polymer granulates by hand (manual blending). The blend was then processed using a twin-screw extruder. The second and third methods utilized a single-screw extruder. In the second method, the BaSO4 powder was manually mixed with the polymer prior to extrusion. In the third method, the BaSO4 powder was mechanically attached on the polymer granulates (mechanical blending) prior to extrusion. The mechanical and chemical properties of the radiopaque bioresorbable fibres were measured after processing and during in vitro degradation. The fibres were gamma, plasma or EtO sterilized. There was no statistical difference in the mechanical properties of the fibres when manufactured using the twin-screw extrusion with manual blending or the single-screw extrusion with mechanical blending. The gamma sterilization markedly decreased the initial intrinsic viscosity of all fibres, whereas the plasma and EtO sterilization methods had no effect on the initial intrinsic viscosity. During in vitro testing, the loss in the intrinsic viscosity occurred at the same rate whether the fibres were loaded with the barium sulfate or not.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2003; 14(7):665-76. · 1.70 Impact Factor
  • Juha-Pekka Nuutinen, Claude Clerc, Pertti Törmälä
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    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out to evaluate if the analytical model developed by Jedwab and Clerc for calculating the mechanical properties of metallic braided stents is also valid for bioabsorbable braided stents. An analytical model could be used to shorten the development cycle of stents by reducing the amount of in vitro testing. Jedwab and Clerc derived formulae for longitudinal stiffness and radial pressure stiffness. The longitudinal stiffness was defined by measuring the stent elongation under load. The radial pressure stiffness was defined from the slope of the load-displacement curve measured with the testing method described by Agrawal and Clark where a collar is placed around the stent to compress it. The radial pressure stiffness was measured with and without lubrication to evaluate the effects of friction between the stent and collar and in the stent structure itself. Two bioabsorbable braided stents and one metallic braided stent were used in the measurements. The metal stent test results were consistent with what was reported by Jedwab and Clerc. However, the analytical model was not applicable to bioabsorbable stents. This was mainly due to the larger fibre diameter of the bioabsorbable stents, which prevents the fibres from freely collapsing when the stent diameter decreases. The analytical model is based on an assumption that the fibres behave independently. However, the testing method described by Agrawal and Clark provided a useful tool to compare the radial force of self-expanding stents.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2003; 14(7):677-87. · 1.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanical properties and in vitro degradation of bioresorbable knitted stents. Each stent was knitted using a single self-reinforced fibre made out of either PLLA or 96L/4D PLA or 80L/20G PLGA. The mechanical and physical properties of the fibres and stents were measured before and after gamma sterilization, as well as during in vitro degradation. The mechanical properties of the knitted stents made out of bioresorbable fibres were similar to those of commercially available metallic stents. The knitting geometry (loop height) had a marked effect on the mechanical properties of the stents. The rate of in vitro degradation in mechanical and physical properties for the PLLA and 96L/4D PLA stents was similar and significantly lower than that of the 80L/20G PLGA stents. The 80L/20G PLGA stents lost about 35% of their initial weight at 11 weeks. At this time, they had lost all their compression resistance strength. These data can be used as a guideline in planning further studies in vivo.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2002; 13(12):1313-23. · 1.70 Impact Factor
  • Juha-Pekka Nuutinen, Claude Clerc, Tuija Virta, Pertti Törmälä
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of various sterilization processes on the physical and mechanical properties of self-reinforced bioabsorbable fibres made out of polylactide (PLLA). The samples were sterilized using plasma, ethylene oxide (one and two cycles), gamma (25 kGy at room temperature, 25 kGy in dry ice, and 2 x 25 kGy at room temperature), and electron beam (15, 25, and 55 kGy) sterilization. The intrinsic viscosity, crystallinity, and mechanical properties (modulus of elasticity, yield strength, and ultimate tensile strength) were tested before and immediately after each sterilization treatment, as well as up to 30 weeks in vitro. Compared with unsterilized fibres, the intrinsic viscosity was markedly decreased after radiation sterilization (gamma and electron beam) and the loss in mechanical properties was accelerated during in vitro degradation. Plasma and ethylene oxide (one and two cycles) did not markedly alter the properties of the samples after sterilization or during in vitro degradation. These data are important for determining the effect of various sterilization processes on the physical and mechanical properties of polylactide-based materials and can be used to predict how fast degradation of the mechanical properties of the self-reinforced PLLA will occur. They can also be used to tailor the degradation kinetics to optimize implant design.
    Journal of Biomaterials Science Polymer Edition 02/2002; 13(12):1325-36. · 1.70 Impact Factor