A. Marín-Franch

Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón, Terol, Aragon, Spain

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Publications (81)144.48 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We present MUFFIT, a new generic code optimized to retrieve the main stellar population parameters of galaxies in photometric multi-filter surveys, and we check its reliability and feasibility with real galaxy data from the ALHAMBRA survey. Making use of an error-weighted $\chi^2$-test, we compare the multi-filter fluxes of galaxies with the synthetic photometry of mixtures of two single stellar populations at different redshifts and extinctions, to provide through a Monte Carlo method the most likely range of stellar population parameters (mainly ages and metallicities), extinctions, redshifts, and stellar masses. To improve the diagnostic reliability, MUFFIT identifies and removes from the analysis those bands that are significantly affected by emission lines. We highlight that the retrieved age-metallicity locus for a sample of $z \le 0.22$ early-type galaxies in ALHAMBRA at different stellar mass bins are in very good agreement with the ones from SDSS spectroscopic diagnostics. Moreover, a one-to-one comparison between the redshifts, ages, metallicities, and stellar masses derived spectroscopically for SDSS and by MUFFIT for ALHAMBRA reveals good qualitative agreements in all the parameters. In addition, and using as input the results from photometric-redshift codes, MUFFIT improves the photometric-redshift accuracy by $\sim 10$-$20\%$, and it also detects nebular emissions in galaxies, providing physical information about their strengths. Our results show the potential of multi-filter galaxy data to conduct reliable stellar population studies with the appropiate analysis techniques, as MUFFIT.
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    ABSTRACT: We present the main steps that will be taken to extract H$\alpha$ emission flux from Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) photometric data. For galaxies with $z\lesssim0.015$, the H$\alpha$+[NII] emission is covered by the J-PLUS narrow-band filter $F660$. We explore three different methods to extract the H$\alpha$ + [NII] flux from J-PLUS photometric data: a combination of a broad-band and a narrow-band filter ($r'$ and $F660$), two broad-band and a narrow-band one ($r'$, $i'$ and $F660$), and a SED-fitting based method using 8 photometric points. To test these methodologies, we simulated J-PLUS data from a sample of 7511 SDSS spectra with measured H$\alpha$ flux. Based on the same sample, we derive two empirical relations to correct the derived H$\alpha$+[NII] flux from dust extinction and [NII] contamination. We find that the only unbiased method is the SED fitting based one. The combination of two filters underestimates the measurements of the H$\alpha$ + [NII] flux by a 28%, while the three filters method by a 9%. We study the error budget of the SED-fitting based method and find that, in addition to the photometric error, our measurements have a systematic uncertainty of a 4.3%. Several sources contribute to this uncertainty: differences between our measurement procedure and the one used to derive the spectroscopic values, the use of simple stellar populations as templates, and the intrinsic errors of the spectra, which were not taken into account. Apart from that, the empirical corrections for dust extinction and [NII] contamination add an extra uncertainty of 14%. Given the J-PLUS photometric system, the best methodology to extract H$\alpha$ + [NII] flux is the SED-fitting based one. Using this method, we are able to recover reliable H$\alpha$ fluxes for thousands of nearby galaxies in a robust and homogeneous way.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 05/2015; DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201526374 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context. Most observational results on the high redshift restframe UV-bright galaxies are based on samples pinpointed using the so called dropout technique or Ly-alpha selection. However, the availability of multifilter data allows now replacing the dropout selections by direct methods based on photometric redshifts. In this paper we present the methodology to select and study the population of high redshift galaxies in the ALHAMBRA survey data. Aims. Our aim is to develop a less biased methodology than the traditional dropout technique to study the high redshift galaxies in ALHAMBRA and other multifilter data. Thanks to the wide area ALHAMBRA covers, we especially aim at contributing in the study of the brightest, less frequent, high redshift galaxies. Methods. The methodology is based on redshift probability distribution functions (zPDFs). It is shown how a clean galaxy sample can be obtained by selecting the galaxies with high integrated probability of being within a given redshift interval. However, reaching both a complete and clean sample with this method is challenging. Hence, a method to derive statistical properties by summing the zPDFs of all the galaxies in the redshift bin of interest is introduced. Results. Using this methodology we derive the galaxy rest frame UV number counts in five redshift bins centred at z=2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0, and 4.5, being complete up to the limiting magnitude at m_UV(AB)=24. With the wide field ALHAMBRA data we especially contribute in the study of the brightest ends of these counts, sampling well the surface densities down to m_UV(AB)=21-22. Conclusions. We show that using the zPDFs it is easy to select a clean sample of high redshift galaxies. We also show that statistical analysis of the properties of galaxies is better done using a probabilistic approach, which takes into account both the incompleteness and contamination in a natural way.
  • Conference Paper: OAJ Control System
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    ABSTRACT: The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys leveraging two unprecedented telescopes with unusually large fields of view. The JST/T250, a 2.55m telescope with a 3deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83cm telescope with a 2deg field of view.The immediate objective of these telescopes for the next years is carrying out two unique photometric surveys covering several thousands square degrees: J-PAS and J-PLUS, each of them with a wide range of scientific applications, like e.g. large structure cosmology and Dark Energy, galaxy evolution, supernovae, Milky Way structure and exoplanets. JST and JAST will be equipped with panoramic cameras being developed within the J-PAS collaboration, JPCam and T80Cam respectively, which make use of large format (~ 10k x 10k) CCDs covering the entire focal plane. CEFCA engineering team has been designing the OAJ control system as a global concept to manage, monitor, control and service the observatory systems, not only astronomical but also infrastructure and other facilities. In order to provide quality, reliability and efficiency for the OAJ control system its design is based on CIA (Control Integrated Architecture) and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) as keys to improve day and night operation processes. The OCS (Observatory Control System) comprises a low level hardware layer including IOs connected directly to sensors and actuators deployed around the whole observatory, telescopes and astronomical instrumentation, and a high level software layer as a tool for efficient observatory operation. We will give an overview of OAJ's control system from an engineering point of view, giving details on the design criteria, technology, architecture, standards, functional blocks, model structure, deployment, goals, current status and next steps in its development.
    XI Reunión Científica de la SEA, Teruel; 09/2014
  • XI Reunión Científica de la SEA, Teruel, Spain; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) (see Benítez et al. 2014) and the Javalambre-Photometric Local Universe Survey (J-PLUS) will be conducted at the brand-new Observatorio de Astrofísica de Javalambre (OAJ) in Teruel, Spain. J-PLUS is going to start by the end of the summer of 2014 while J-PAS first light is expected to happen along 2015. Besides the two main telescopes (with 2.5m and 80cm apertures), several smaller-sized facilities are present at the OAJ devoted to site characterization and supporting measurements to be used to calibrate the J-PAS and J-PLUS photometry and to feed up the OAJ's Sequencer with input parameters, in particular: the integrated seeing and the sky transparency. The instruments in charge of these measurements are three: an extinction monitor: an 11" telescope estimating the atmospheric extinction at a set of ten selected bands in order to trace the observatory's extinction curve, which is the initial step to J-PAS overall photometric calibration procedure; an 8" telescope implementing the Differential Image Motion Monitor (DIMM) technique to obtain the integrated seeing; and an All-Sky Transmission MONitor (ASTMON), a roughly all-sky instrument providing the sky transparency as well as sky brightness and the atmospheric extinction too. The main technical features of these instruments, their performance, their up-to-date results and their importance in the context of J-PAS, J-PLUS and the general operation of the Observatory are addressed here.
    XI Reunión Científica de la SEA, Teruel; 09/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The “Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre” (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys with two unprecedented telescopes of unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250m, a 2.55 meter telescope of 3 deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83 cm telescope of 2 deg field of view. In order to maintain image quality during operations, deformations and rigid body motions must be actively controlled to minimize optical disturbances. Multiple software tools have been developed to accomplish this goal, constituting the OAJ Active Optics Pipeline (OPAC). We present a comprehensive analysis of the curvature wave-front sensing system, pupil registration, wavefront estimators and the iteration matrix evaluation techniques. Finally, it is shown a practical application to resolve the T80 telescope initial alignment among M1 and M2 during commissioning.
    XI Reunión Científica de la SEA, Teruel; 09/2014
  • XI Reunión Científica de la SEA; 09/2014
  • S. Reichel, U. Brauneck, S. Bourquin, A. Marín-Franch
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    ABSTRACT: The Observatorio Astrofisico de Javalambre in Spain observes with its telescope galaxies in the Local Universe plans to perform a multi-band survey, where optical filters are needed. Different filters with a full width half maximum between 10-20 nm with central wavelengths at 395 nm, 410 nm, 430 nm, 515 nm, and an average transmission Tave larger than 85 % in the passband and blocking from 250 nm to 1050 nm of OD5 (T < 10-5) will be shown. The edges are steep for a narrow transition from 5 % to 80 % and the transmitted wavefront error of the optical filter are less than λ/2 over an aperture > 100 mm.
    SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation; 08/2014
  • SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation; 07/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre in Spain is a new astronomical facility particularly conceived for carrying out large sky surveys with two unprecedented telescopes of unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250, a 2.55m telescope of 3deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83cm telescope of 2deg field of view. The most immediate objective of the two telescopes for the next years is carrying out two unique photometric surveys of several thousands square degrees, J-PAS[9][14][16] and J-PLUS [14][16], each of them with a wide range of scientific applications, like e.g. large structure cosmology and Dark Energy, galaxy evolution, supernovae, Milky Way structure, exoplanets, among many others. To do that, JST and JAST will be equipped with panoramic cameras under development within the J-PAS collaboration, JPCam and T80Cam respectively, which make use of large format (~ 10k x 10k) CCDs covering the entire focal plane. This paper describes in detail the engineering development of the overall facilities and infrastructures for the robotic observatory and a global overview of current status and future actions to perform from engineering point of view.
    SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation; 07/2014
  • SPIE Astronomical Telescopes + Instrumentation; 07/2014
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys with two unprecedented telescopes of unusually large fields of view: the JST/T250, a 2.55m telescope of 3deg field of view, and the JAST/T80, an 83cm telescope of 2deg field of view. CEFCA engineering team has been designing the OAJ control system as a global concept to manage, monitor, control and maintain all the observatory systems including not only astronomical subsystems but also infrastructure and other facilities. In order to provide quality, reliability and efficiency, the OAJ control system (OCS) design is based on CIA (Control Integrated Architecture) and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) as a key to improve day and night operation processes. The OCS goes from low level hardware layer including IOs connected directly to sensors and actuators deployed around the whole observatory systems, including telescopes and astronomical instrumentation, up to the high level software layer as a tool to perform efficiently observatory operations. We will give an overview of the OAJ control system design and implementation from an engineering point of view, giving details of the design criteria, technology, architecture, standards, functional blocks, model structure, development, deployment, goals, report about the actual status and next steps.
    Software and Cyberinfrastructure for Astronomy III, Montreal; 06/2014
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    ABSTRACT: The Observatorio Astrofísico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new Spanish astronomical facility particularly designed for carrying out large sky surveys. The OAJ is mainly motivated by the development of J-PAS, the Javalambre- PAU Astrophysical Survey, an unprecedented astronomical survey that aims to observe 8500 deg2 of the sky with a set of 54 optical contiguous narrow-band filters (FWHM ~14 nm) and 5 mid and broad-band ones. J-PAS will provide a low resolution spectrum (R ~ 50) for every pixel of the Northern sky down to AB~22:5 - 23:5 per square arcsecond (at 5 σ level), depending on the narrow-band filter, and ~ 2 magnitudes deeper for the redder broad-band filters. The main telescope at the OAJ is the Javalambre Survey Telescope (JST/T250), an innovative Ritchey-Chrétien, alt-azimuthal, large-etendue telescope with a primary mirror diameter of 2.55m and 3 deg (diameter) FoV. The JST/T250 is the telescope devoted to conduct J-PAS with JPCam, a panoramic camera of 4.7 deg2 FoV and a mosaic of 14 large format CCDs that, overall, amounts to 1.2 Gpix. The second largest telescope at the OAJ is the Javalambre Auxiliary Survey Telescope (JAST/T80), a Ritchey-Chrétien, German-equatorial telescope of 82 cm primary mirror and 2 deg FoV, whose main goal is to perform J-PLUS, the Javalambre Photometric Local Universe Survey. J-PLUS will cover the same sky area of J-PAS using the panoramic camera T80Cam with 12 filters in the optical range, which are specifically defined to perform the photometric calibration of J-PAS. The OAJ project officially started in mid 2010. Four years later, the OAJ is mostly completed and the first OAJ operations have already started. The civil work and engineering installations are finished, including the telescope buildings and the domes. JAST/T80 is at the OAJ undertaking commissioning tasks, and JST/T250 is in AIV phase at the OAJ. Related astronomical subsystems like the seeing and atmospheric extinction monitors and the all-sky camera are fully operative. This paper aims to present a brief description and status of the OAJ main installations, telescopes and cameras. The current development and operation plan of the OAJ in terms of staffing organization, resources, observation scheduling, and data archiving, is also described.
    Software and Cyberinfrastructure for Astronomy III, Montreal; 06/2014
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    S. Ramírez Alegría, A. Marín-Franch, A. Herrero
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    ABSTRACT: The discovery of new, obscured massive star clusters has changed our understanding of the Milky Way star-forming activity from a passive to a very active star-forming machine. The search for these obscured clusters is strongly supported by the use of all-sky, near-IR surveys. The main goal of the MASGOMAS project is to search for and study unknown, young, and massive star clusters in the Milky Way, using near-IR data. Here we try to determine the main physical parameters (distance, size, total mass, and age) of Masgomas-4, a new double-core obscured cluster. Using near-IR photometry ($J$, $H$, and $K_S$) we selected a total of 21 stars as OB-type star candidates. Multi-object, near-IR follow-up spectroscopy allowed us to carry out the spectral classification of the OB-type candidates. Of the 21 spectroscopically observed stars, ten are classified as OB-type stars, eight as F- to early G-type dwarf stars, and three as late-type giant stars. Spectroscopically estimated distances indicate that the OB-type stars belong to the same cluster, located at a distance of $1.90^{+1.28}_{-0.90}$ kpc. Our spectrophotometric data confirm a very young and massive stellar population, with a clear concentration of pre-main-sequence massive candidates (Herbig Ae/Be) around one of the cluster cores. The presence of a surrounding HII cloud and the Herbig Ae/Be candidates indicate an upper age limit of 5 Myr.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 05/2014; 567. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201322921 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There are many ways to solve the challenging problem of making a high performance robotic observatory from scratch. The Observatorio Astrof\'isico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys. The OAJ control system has been designed under a global point of view including not only astronomical subsystems but also infrastructure and other facilities. Three main factors have been considered in the design of a global control system for the robotic OAJ: quality, reliability and efficiency. We propose CIA (Control Integrated Architecture) design and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) as a key performance indicator in order to improve operation processes, minimizing resources and obtain high cost reduction maintaining quality requirements. The OAJ subsystems considered for the control integrated architecture are the following: two wide-field telescopes and their instrumentation, active optics subsystems, facilities for sky quality monitoring (seeing, extinction, sky background, sky brightness, clouds distribution, meteorological station), domes and several infrastructure facilities such as water supply, glycol water, water treatment plant, air conditioning, compressed air, LN2 plant, illumination, surveillance, access control, fire suppression, electrical generators, electrical distribution, electrical consumption, communication network, Uninterruptible Power Supply and two main control rooms, one at the OAJ and other remotely located in Teruel at 40km from the observatory, connected through a microwave radio-link. Here we present the OAJ strategy in control design to achieve maximum quality efficiency for the observatory processes and operations, giving practical examples of our approach.
    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering 04/2014; DOI:10.1117/12.925665 · 0.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Javalambre-Physics of the Accelerated Universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS) is a narrow band, very wide field Cosmological Survey to be carried out from the Javalambre Observatory in Spain with a purpose-built, dedicated 2.5m telescope and a 4.7 sq.deg. camera with 1.2Gpix. Starting in late 2015, J-PAS will observe 8500sq.deg. of Northern Sky and measure $0.003(1+z)$ photo-z for $9\times10^7$ LRG and ELG galaxies plus several million QSOs, sampling an effective volume of $\sim 14$ Gpc$^3$ up to $z=1.3$ and becoming the first radial BAO experiment to reach Stage IV. J-PAS will detect $7\times 10^5$ galaxy clusters and groups, setting constrains on Dark Energy which rival those obtained from its BAO measurements. Thanks to the superb characteristics of the site (seeing ~0.7 arcsec), J-PAS is expected to obtain a deep, sub-arcsec image of the Northern sky, which combined with its unique photo-z precision will produce one of the most powerful cosmological lensing surveys before the arrival of Euclid. J-PAS unprecedented spectral time domain information will enable a self-contained SN survey that, without the need for external spectroscopic follow-up, will detect, classify and measure $\sigma_z\sim 0.5\%$ redshifts for $\sim 4000$ SNeIa and $\sim 900$ core-collapse SNe. The key to the J-PAS potential is its innovative approach: a contiguous system of 54 filters with $145\AA$ width, placed $100\AA$ apart over a multi-degree FoV is a powerful "redshift machine", with the survey speed of a 4000 multiplexing low resolution spectrograph, but many times cheaper and much faster to build. The J-PAS camera is equivalent to a 4.7 sq.deg. "IFU" and it will produce a time-resolved, 3D image of the Northern Sky with a very wide range of Astrophysical applications in Galaxy Evolution, the nearby Universe and the study of resolved stellar populations.
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    ABSTRACT: We study the characteristics of a narrow band type Ia supernova survey through simulations based on the upcoming Javalambre Physics of the accelerating universe Astrophysical Survey (J-PAS). This unique survey has the capabilities of obtaining distances, redshifts, and the SN type from a single experiment thereby circumventing the challenges faced by the resource-intensive spectroscopic follow-up observations. We analyse the flux measurements signal-to-noise ratio and bias, the supernova typing performance, the ability to recover light curve parameters given by the SALT2 model, the photometric redshift precision from type Ia supernova light curves and the effects of systematic errors on the data. We show that such a survey is not only feasible but may yield large type Ia supernova samples (up to 300 supernovae at $z<0.5$ per month of search) with low core collapse contamination ($\sim 3$ per cent), good precision on the SALT2 parameters (average $\sigma_{m_B}=0.063$, $\sigma_{x_1}=0.47$ and $\sigma_c=0.040$) and on the distance modulus (average $\sigma_{\mu}=0.17$, assuming an intrinsic scatter $\sigma_{\mathrm{int}}=0.14$), with identified systematic uncertainties $\sigma_{\mathrm{sys}}\lesssim 0.10 \sigma_{\mathrm{stat}}$. Moreover, the filters are narrow enough to detect most spectral features and obtain excellent photometric redshift precision of $\sigma_z=0.005$, apart from $\sim$ 2 per cent of outliers. We also present a few strategies for optimising the survey's outcome. Together with the detailed host galaxy information, narrow band surveys can be very valuable for the study of supernova rates, spectral feature relations, intrinsic colour variations and correlations between supernova and host galaxy properties, all of which are important information for supernova cosmological applications.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2013; 444(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu1611 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we compare the photometric data of 34 Milky Way globular clusters, observed within the ACS Treasury Program (PI: Ata Sarajedini) with the corresponding ground-based data, provided by the Photometric Standard Field Catalogs of Stetson (2000, 2005). We focus on the transformation between the HST/ACS F606W to V-band and F814W to I-band only. The goal is to assess the validity of the filter transformation equations by Sirianni et al.(2005) with respect to their dependence on metallicity, Horizontal Branch morphology, mass and integrated (V-I) colour of the various globular clusters. Such a dependence is expected due to the fact that the transformation equations are based on the observations of only one globular cluster, i.e., NGC 2419. Surprisingly, the correlation between offset and metallicity is found to be weak, with a low level significance. The correlation between offset and Horizontal Branch structure, as well as total cluster mass is still weaker. Based on the available data we do not find the photometric offset to be linked to multiple stellar populations, e.g., as found in NGC 0288, NGC 1851, and NGC 5139. The results of this study show that there are small systematic offsets between the transformed ACS- and observed ground based photometry, and that these are only weakly correlated, if at all, with various cluster parameters and their underlying stellar populations. As a result, investigators wishing to transform globular cluster photometry from the Sirianni et al.(2005) ground-based V, I system onto the Stetson (2000) system simply need to add 0.040 (+/-0.012) to the V-band magnitudes and 0.047 (+/-0.011) to the I-band magnitudes. This in turn means that the transformed ACS (V-I) colours match the ground-based values from Stetson (2000) to within ~0.01 mag.
    The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 12/2013; 211(1). DOI:10.1088/0067-0049/211/1/1 · 14.14 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

838 Citations
144.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2014
    • Centro de Estudios de Física del Cosmos de Aragón
      Terol, Aragon, Spain
  • 2013
    • Dartmouth College
      • Department of Physics & Astronomy
      Hanover, New Hampshire, United States
  • 2010–2012
    • Complutense University of Madrid
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2010–2011
    • Universidad de La Laguna
      • Department of Astrophysics
      San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 2001–2010
    • Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias
      San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain
  • 2004–2009
    • University of Florida
      • Department of Astronomy
      Gainesville, Florida, United States