Jacques Van Huysse

Universitair Ziekenhuis Ghent, Gand, Flanders, Belgium

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Publications (23)156.43 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic left lateral sectionectomy (LLS) has gained popularity in its use for benign and malignant tumors. This report describes the evolution of the authors' experience using laparoscopic LLS for different indications including living liver donation. Between January 2004 and January 2009, 37 consecutive patients underwent laparoscopic LLS for benign, primary, and metastatic liver diseases, and for one case of living liver donation. Resection of malignant tumors was indicated for 19 (51%) of the 37 patients. All but three patients (deceased due to metastatic cancer disease) are alive and well after a median follow-up period of 20 months (range, 8-46 months). Liver cell adenomas (72%) were the main indication among benign tumors, and colorectal liver metastases (84%) were the first indication of malignancy. One case of live liver donation was performed. Whereas 16 patients (43%) had undergone a previous abdominal surgery, 3 patients (8%) had LLS combined with bowel resection. The median operation time was of 195 min (range, 115-300 min), and the median blood loss was of 50 ml (range, 0-500 ml). Mild to severe steatosis was noted in 7 patients (19%) and aspecific portal inflammation in 11 patients (30%). A median free margin of 5 mm (range, 5-27 mm) was achieved for all cancer patients. The overall recurrence rate for colorectal liver metastases was of 44% (7 patients), but none recurred at the surgical margin. No conversion to laparotomy was recorded, and the overall morbidity rate was 8.1% (1 grade 1 and 2 grade 2 complications). The median hospital stay was 6 days (range, 2-10 days). Laparoscopic LLS without portal clamping can be performed safely for cases of benign and malignant liver disease with minimal blood loss and overall morbidity, free resection margins, and a favorable outcome. As the ultimate step of the learning curve, laparoscopic LLS could be routinely proposed, potentially increasing the donor pool for living-related liver transplantation.
    Surgical Endoscopy 01/2011; 25(1):79-87. DOI:10.1007/s00464-010-1133-8 · 3.31 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Placental growth factor (PlGF) is known for its role in pathological conditions to protect parenchymal cells of different organs from injury, whereas its presence in the liver and its potential importance in stimulating liver regeneration has never been described. This was investigated in this study using a rat model of partial hepatectomy (PH). The rat model of 70, 80, and 90% PH was used. Liver samples were taken peroperatively, 1 h, 1, 2, 3, and 7 days after surgery. Liver regeneration was evaluated by liver weight/body weight ratio, liver regeneration rate (%), and proliferating cell marker Ki67. The expression of PlGF, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor 1 (Flt-1), VEGF receptor 2 (Flk-1), and hypoxia inducible factor-1α mRNA was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and localized by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA expression of PlGF was upregulated immediately after PH. Compared with 70 and 80% PH groups, the 90% PH group had a significantly lower PlGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1α mRNA expression, in parallel to a delayed liver weight/body weight ratio recovery. Only little differences were observed in VEGF, Flt-1, and Flk-1 mRNA expression among the PH groups. This study shows for the first time the PlGF upregulation in regenerating livers, which is related to hypoxia stimulation and liver growth. The swift PlGF upregulation immediately after PH may indicate an important role for the PlGF/Flt-1 pathway in the early stage of liver regeneration.
    European journal of gastroenterology & hepatology 11/2010; 23(1):66-75. DOI:10.1097/MEG.0b013e328341ef35 · 2.15 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is a demand for serum markers that can routinely assess the progression of liver cancer. DENA (diethylnitrosamine), a hepatocarcinogen, is commonly used in an experimental mouse model to induce liver cancer that closely mimics a subclass of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, blood monitoring of the progression of HCC in mouse model has not yet been achieved. In this report, we studied glycomics during the development of mouse HCC induced by DENA. Mouse HCC was induced by DENA. Serum N-glycans were profiled using the sequencer assisted-Fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis technique developed in our laboratory. Possible alteration in the transcription of genes relevant to the synthesis of the changed glycans was analysed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In comparison with the control mice that received the same volume of saline, a tri-antennary glycan (peak 8) and a biantennary glycan (peak 4) in serum total glycans of DENA mice increased gradually but significantly during progression of liver cancer, whereas a core-fucosylated biantennary glycan (peak 6) decreased. Expression of alpha-1,6-fucosyltransferase 8 (Fut8), which is responsible for core fucosylation, decreased in the liver of DENA mice compared with that of age-matched control mice. Likewise, the expression level of Mgat4a, which is responsible for tri-antennary, significantly increased in the liver of DENA mice (P<0.001). The changes of N-glycan levels in the serum could be used as a biomarker to monitor the progress of HCC and to follow up the treatment of liver tumours in this DENA mouse model.
    Liver international: official journal of the International Association for the Study of the Liver 09/2010; 30(8):1221-1228. DOI:10.1111/j.1478-3231.2010.02279.x · 4.41 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 04/2010; 52. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(10)60133-X · 10.40 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 04/2010; 52. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(10)60918-X · 10.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiogenesis has recently been described as a component of inflammatory bowel disease. Placental growth factor (PlGF), a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) homologue, establishes its angiogenic capacity under pathophysiological conditions. We investigated the function of PlGF in experimental models of acute colitis. Acute colonic damage was induced in PlGF knock-out ((-/-)) mice and PlGF wild-type ((+/+)) mice by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) and trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). The concentrations of PlGF and VEGF were measured in distal colonic lysates using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Colonic injury was evaluated by assessing colon length, colonocyte apoptosis (by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling), colonic cytokine production and histological score. Infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells was determined by assaying myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In a separate experiment, recombinant PlGF was administered to PlGF(-/-) mice by adenoviral transfer before DSS administration. Mucosal vascularization was quantified by computerized morphometric analysis of CD31-stained distal colonic sections. Colonic mucosal hypoxia was visualized by pimonidazole staining. Both VEGF and PlGF were upregulated during acute colitis. In addition, compared with PlGF(+/+) controls, PlGF(-/-) mice showed a significant increase in weight loss and colonic shortening during both DSS and TNBS colitis. This correlated with enhanced colonocyte apoptosis, elevated colonic cytokine levels and increased histological damage score, but not with enhanced inflammatory cell infiltration (MPO activity). The increased morbidity of PlGF(-/-) mice during DSS colitis was preventable by adenovirus (Ad)-mediated overexpression of PlGF. After the administration of DSS, strongly reduced mucosal angiogenesis was observed in PlGF(-/-) mice compared with PlGF(+/+) mice. This was associated with an early increase in intestinal epithelial pimonidazole accumulation in PlGF(-/-) mice, suggesting a function of enhanced epithelial hypoxia in the observed differences between the two groups. In summary, our data show that the absence of PlGF strongly inhibits mucosal intestinal angiogenesis in acute colitis, which is associated with an early increase in intestinal epithelial hypoxia and aggravation of the course of the disease.
    Laboratory Investigation 02/2010; 90(4):566-76. DOI:10.1038/labinvest.2010.37 · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal disorder. Systemic treatment of IBD patients with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antibodies has proven to be a highly promising approach, but several drawbacks remain, including side effects related to systemic administration and high cost of treatment. Lactococcus lactis was engineered to secrete monovalent and bivalent murine (m)TNF-neutralizing Nanobodies as therapeutic proteins. These therapeutic proteins are derived from fragments of heavy-chain camelid antibodies and are more stable than conventional antibodies. L. lactis-secreted anti-mTNF Nanobodies neutralized mTNF in vitro. Daily oral administration of Nanobody-secreting L. lactis resulted in local delivery of anti-mTNF Nanobodies at the colon and significantly reduced inflammation in mice with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced chronic colitis. In addition, this approach was also successful in improving established enterocolitis in interleukin 10 (IL10)(-/-) mice. Finally, L. lactis-secreted anti-mTNF Nanobodies did not interfere with systemic Salmonella infection in colitic IL10(-/-) mice.In conclusion, this report details a new therapeutic approach for treatment of chronic colitis, involving in situ secretion of anti-mTNF Nanobodies by orally administered L. lactis bacteria. Therapeutic application of these engineered bacteria could eventually lead to more effective and safer management of IBD in humans.
    Mucosal Immunology 09/2009; 3(1):49-56. DOI:10.1038/mi.2009.116 · 7.54 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 05/2009; 136(5). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(09)61103-3 · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2009; 3(1). DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(09)60317-2 · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This intravital fluorescence microscopy (IVFM) study validates cirrhotic mice models and describes the different intrahepatic alterations and the role of angiogenesis in the liver during genesis of cirrhosis. Cirrhosis was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) and by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in mice. Diameters of sinusoids, portal venules (PV), central venules (CV) and shunts were measured at different time points by IVFM. Thereafter, liver samples were taken for sirius red, CD31, Ki67, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) evaluation by immunohistochemistry (IHC). In parallel with fibrogenesis, hepatic microcirculation was markedly disturbed in CCl(4) and CBDL mice with a significant decrease in sinusoidal diameter compared to control mice. In CCl(4) mice, CV were enlarged, with marked sinusoidal-free spaces around CV. In contrast, PV were enlarged in CBDL mice and bile lakes were observed. In both mice models, intrahepatic shunts developed gradually after induction. During genesis of cirrhosis using CD31 IHC we observed a progressive increase in the number of blood vessels within the fibrotic septa area and a progressively increase in staining by Ki67, VEGF and alpha-SMA of endothelial cells, hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells respectively. In vivo study of the hepatic microcirculation demonstrated a totally disturbed intrahepatic architecture, with narrowing of sinusoids in both cirrhotic mice models. The diameters of CV and PV increased and large shunts, bypassing the sinusoids, were seen after both CCl(4) and CBDL induction. Thus present study shows that there is angiogenesis in the liver during cirrhogenesis, and this is probably due partially to an increased production of VEGF.
    International Journal of Experimental Pathology 01/2009; 89(6):419-32. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2613.2008.00608.x · 2.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study identifies and characterizes the antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody (mAb) 14C5. We compared the expression of antigen 14C5 with the expression of eight integrin subunits (alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, alphav, beta1, beta2, beta3, and beta4) and three integrin heterodimers (alphavbeta3, alphavbeta5, and alpha5beta1) by flow cytometry. Antigen 14C5 showed a similar expression to alphavbeta5 in eight different epithelial cancer cell lines (A549, A2058, C32, Capan-2, Colo16, HT-1080, HT-29, and SKBR-3). Specific binding of P1F6, an anti-alphavbeta5 specific antibody, was blocked by mAb 14C5. After transient expression of alphavbeta5 in 14C5-negative Colo16 cells, mAb 14C5 was able to bind a subpopulation of alphavbeta5-positive cells. We evaluated the tissue distribution of the 14C5 antigen in colon (n = 20) and lung (n = 16) cancer tissues. The colon carcinoma cells stained positive for 14C5 in 50% of tumors analyzed, whereas bronchoalveolar lung carcinoma and typical carcinoid were not positive for the antigen. More common types of non-small cell lung cancer, i.e., squamous (n = 5) and adenocarcinoma (n = 3), stained positive in 2 of 5 squamous carcinomas and in 1 of 3 investigated adenocarcinoma. Colon (95%) and lung (50%) carcinoma tissues showed extensive expression of antigen 14C5 in the stroma surrounding the tumor cells and on the membrane of the adjacent fibroblasts. We show for the first time that mAb 14C5 binds the vascular integrin alphavbeta5, suggesting that mAb 14C5 can be used as a screening agent to select colon and lung cancer patients that are eligible for anti-alphavbeta5-based therapies.
    Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 01/2009; 7(12):3771-9. DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.MCT-08-0600 · 6.11 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 04/2008; 134(4). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(08)63766-X · 13.93 Impact Factor
  • Gastroenterology 04/2008; 134(4). DOI:10.1016/S0016-5085(08)63767-1 · 13.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) has gained wide acceptance for various liver resection procedures, mainly for benign diseases. However, only small series have been reported from a few selected centers. Between January 2001 and January 2006, a total of 629 liver resections were performed at our institution. The indication was solid benign liver tumor in 56 (8.9%) patients. LLR was performed in 20 (35.7%) cases. Data from the LLR group were compared with those from a consecutive control group undergoing open liver surgery (OS) for similar indications in a matched-pair analysis during the same period. The pairs were matched as closely as possible for age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, indication for resection, and type and location of the lesions. The endpoint was to investigate overall morbidity and outcome. All patients but one are alive and well after a mean follow-up of 35 months (range 10-60 months). Conversion laparotomy was required in two out of 20 (10%) cases for uncontrolled bleeding (one requiring temporary hemodialysis). LLR was characterized by faster time to first oral intake and shorter hospital stay compared to OS (p = 0.001 and 0.008, respectively). Incisional hernias (25%) were only recorded in the OS (p = 0.047 vs. LLR). Overall morbidity was 45% in OS versus 20% in LLR (p = 0.3). LLR significantly reduced time to oral intake, hospital stay, and incisional hernias compared to OS. Bleeding is a major risk and should be carefully considered when resecting benign tumors. In the hands of expert surgeons, LLR may become the gold standard for the resection of benign liver tumors located in the anterior and lateral sectors and for minor hepatic resections.
    Surgical Endoscopy 02/2008; 22(1):38-44. DOI:10.1007/s00464-007-9527-y · 3.31 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 01/2008; 48. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(08)60533-4 · 10.40 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 01/2008; 48. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(08)60513-9 · 10.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Donation after cardiac death has reemerged as a potential way of increasing the supply of organs for transplantation. We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of non-heart-beating donor (NHBD) liver transplantation (OLT) experience and compared with standard heart-beating donation (HBD) at a single center. From October 2003 to November 2006, 13/111 liver transplantations were performed in our institution with NHBD. Living donor liver transplantation, splitting procedures, combined, and pediatric liver transplantations were excluded from this analysis. Donor population was similar in both groups. The median warm ischemia time was 10 minutes (range 6 to 38). The median cold ischemia times 6 hours and 16 minutes (2.4 to 6.30 hours and 9 hours and 14 minutes (2.15 to 15.35 hours) for NHBD and HBD groups, respectively (P = .0002). In the NHBD groups, 4/13 (31%) grafts were retransplanted within 3 months, due to ischemic biliary lesions with severe cholestasis (n = 3) or due to the occurrence of primary nonfunction (n = 1). The retransplantation rate was significantly lower in the HBD group (11/98, 11%; P = .03). One-year patient and graft survivals were 62% and 54% versus 86% and 79%, respectively, for the NHBD and HBD groups (P = .107 and P = .003). Liver grafts procured from donors after cardiac death accounted for a significantly greater retransplantation rates, mainly due to nonanastomotic biliary strictures. This risk must be taken into account when transplanting such grafts. Based upon this experience, NHBD cannot rival HBD to be a comparable source of quality organs for liver transplantation.
    Transplantation Proceedings 11/2007; 39(8):2675-7. DOI:10.1016/j.transproceed.2007.08.008 · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Hepatology 04/2006; 44. DOI:10.1016/S0168-8278(06)80120-0 · 10.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Effective therapeutics for treating acute colitis, caused by disruption of the intestinal epithelial barrier, are scarce. Trefoil factors (TFF) are cytoprotective and promote epithelial wound healing and reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract, which makes them good candidate therapeutics for acute colitis. However, orally administered TFF stick to the mucus of the small intestine and are absorbed at the cecum. We have engineered the food-grade bacterium Lactococcus lactis to secrete bioactive murine TFF. The protective and therapeutic potentials of these TFF-secreting L. lactis were evaluated in parallel with purified TFF in the dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced murine model for acute colitis and in established chronic colitis in interleukin (IL)-10(-/-) mice. Disease was evaluated by blinded macroscopic and microscopic inflammatory scores and by myeloperoxidase activity. Intragastric administration of TFF-secreting L. lactis led to active delivery of TFF at the mucosa of the colon and, in contrast to administration of purified TFF, proved to be very effective in prevention and healing of acute DSS-induced colitis. The in situ secreted murine TFF significantly decreased morbidity and mortality and stimulated prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 expression, which represents a major therapeutic pathway. In addition, this approach was successful in improving established chronic colitis in IL-10(-/-) mice. We have positively evaluated a new therapeutic approach for acute and chronic colitis that involves in situ secretion of murine TFF by orally administered L. lactis. This novel approach may lead to effective management of acute and chronic colitis and epithelial damage in humans.
    Gastroenterology 08/2004; 127(2):502-13. DOI:10.1053/j.gastro.2004.05.020 · 13.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although portal venous supply is considered essential to preserve hepatic integrity, in this study, effects of portal arterialization on liver regeneration were evaluated in a rat model of partial hepatectomy (PH). Ninety-six Lewis rats were randomly assigned to four groups of 24 rats each: PH only (group 1), PH with either venous or arterialized portal supply (groups 2 and 3, respectively), and PH without portal supply (group 4). Liver regeneration rate (LRR), 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling index, and liver biological characteristics were assessed on days 1, 2, 3, and 7. Compared with group 1, all tested rats had a marked body weight loss after surgery, and only rats in group 4 showed no signs of recovery on day 7. With maintained portal inflow (groups 1, 2, and 3), LRRs increased steadily to day-7 values of 89.2% +/- 11.8%, 81.4% +/- 8%, and 77.4% +/- 9.4%, respectively (P = not significant), and 24-hour peak values of BrdU labeling index were 159 +/- 26, 157 +/- 42, and 149 +/- 48, respectively (P = not significant). Conversely, rats deprived of portal supply (group 4) showed profound inhibition of these two parameters (14 +/- 13; P <.01;32.1% +/- 7.7%; P <.001, respectively). These results indicate that proper portal blood supply is essential to initiate and maintain liver regeneration after PH. With an equivalent portal inflow rate of either venous or arterial source, the hepatic regeneration response can be sustained.
    Liver Transplantation 02/2002; 8(2):146-52. DOI:10.1053/jlts.2002.30887 · 3.79 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

346 Citations
156.43 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001–2011
    • Universitair Ziekenhuis Ghent
      • Division of Hepatobiliary and General Surgery
      Gand, Flanders, Belgium
  • 2004–2010
    • Ghent University
      • Department of Pathology
      Gand, Flanders, Belgium