Daniel J. Eisenstein

Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (398)1445.03 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of 9 088 new spectroscopically confirmed white dwarfs and subdwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10. We obtain Teff, log g and mass for hydrogen atmosphere white dwarf stars (DAs) and helium atmosphere white dwarf stars (DBs), and estimate the calcium/helium abundances for the white dwarf stars with metallic lines (DZs) and carbon/helium for carbon dominated spectra DQs. We found 1 central star of a planetary nebula, 2 new oxygen spectra on helium atmosphere white dwarfs, 71 DQs, 42 hot DO/PG1159s, 171 white dwarf+main sequence star binaries, 206 magnetic DAHs, 327 continuum dominated DCs, 397 metal polluted white dwarfs, 450 helium dominated white dwarfs, 647 subdwarfs and 6887 new hydrogen dominated white dwarf stars.
    11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SN) data. We take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Ly-alpha forest (LyaF) in the BOSS survey of SDSS-III. BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy, and in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Combining BAO and SN data into an "inverse distance ladder" yields a 1.7% measurement of $H_0=67.3 \pm1.1$ km/s/Mpc. This measurement assumes standard pre-recombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat LCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For open LCDM, our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields $\Omega_m=0.301 \pm 0.008$ and curvature $\Omega_k=-0.003 \pm 0.003$. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints remain consistent with flat LCDM. While the overall $\chi^2$ of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2-2.5 sigma) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshifts remain consistent with our constraints, but models where dark matter decays into radiation are sharply limited. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit of 0.56 eV on the summed mass of neutrino species, improving to 0.26 eV if we include Planck CMB lensing. Standard dark energy models constrained by our data predict a level of matter clustering that is high compared to most, but not all, observational estimates. (Abridged)
    11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the redshift evolution of the high-mass end of the ^{0.55}i-band Red Sequence Luminosity Function (RS LF) within the redshift range 0.52<z<0.65, obtained from the DR10 BOSS CMASS sample, which comprises ~ 600,000 galaxies. We have developed an analytical method based on an unbinned maximum likelihood approach for deconvolving the observed CMASS distribution from photometric errors and accounting for selection effects. This procedure requires modeling the covariance matrix for the i-band magnitude, g-r color and r-i color using Stripe 82 multi-epoch data. The error-deconvolved intrinsic RS distribution is consistent with a single point in the color-color plane, which implies that the great majority of the observed scatter is due to photometric errors. We estimate that RS completeness is ~0.80-0.85 at z\geq0.52 in the CMASS sample, dropping drastically below that redshift. Approximately 37% of all objects in the CMASS sample belong intrinsically to the blue cloud. Within the redshift and absolute magnitude range considered (^{0.55}M_i \lesssim -22), the evolution of the RS LF is consistent with a Schechter Function of \Phi_* = (6.693\pm0.042) x 10^{-4} Mpc^{-3} mag^{-1}, passively fading at a rate of 1.180\pm0.001 mag per unit redshift. This result implies an age of ~4-5 Gyr at z=0.70, and a formation redshift of z=2-3, for the LRG population, independently of the SPS model used. As for the intrinsic RS colors, FSPS models within a grid covering a wide range of metallicities and dust contents tend to predict a milder evolution as compared to the observations. The best agreement seems to be found for solar-metallicity, dust-free FSPS models with ages greater than ~5 Gyr, which would be consistent with our fading rate results. The Maraston et al. (2009) passive LRG model provides an excellent match to the color-redshift trend, implying an age of ~3-4 Gyr at z=0.70. [ABRIDGED]
    10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM) is a dedicated multi-object RM experiment that has spectroscopically monitored a sample of 849 broad-line quasars in a single 7 deg$^2$ field with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. The RM quasar sample is flux-limited to i_psf=21.7 mag, and covers a redshift range of 0.1<z<4.5. Optical spectroscopy was performed during 2014 Jan-Jul dark/grey time, with an average cadence of ~4 days, totaling more than 30 epochs. Supporting photometric monitoring in the g and i bands was conducted at multiple facilities including the CFHT and the Steward Observatory Bok telescopes in 2014, with a cadence of ~2 days and covering all lunar phases. The RM field (RA, DEC=14:14:49.00, +53:05:00.0) lies within the CFHT-LS W3 field, and coincides with the Pan-STARRS 1 (PS1) Medium Deep Field MD07, with three prior years of multi-band PS1 light curves. The SDSS-RM 6-month baseline program aims to detect time lags between the quasar continuum and broad line region (BLR) variability on timescales of up to several months (in the observed frame) for ~10% of the sample, and to anchor the time baseline for continued monitoring in the future to detect lags on longer timescales and at higher redshift. SDSS-RM is the first major program to systematically explore the potential of RM for broad-line quasars at z>0.3, and will investigate the prospects of RM with all major broad lines covered in optical spectroscopy. SDSS-RM will provide guidance on future multi-object RM campaigns on larger scales, and is aiming to deliver more than tens of BLR lag detections for a homogeneous sample of quasars. We describe the motivation, design and implementation of this program, and outline the science impact expected from the resulting data for RM and general quasar science.
    08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We study the evidence for a symbiotic connection between active galactic nuclei (AGN) fueling and star formation by investigating the relationship between the X-ray luminosities of AGN and the star formation rates (SFRs) of their host galaxies. We identify a sample of 309 AGN with X-ray luminosities $10^{41}<L_\mathrm{X}<10^{44} $ erg s$^{-1}$ at $0.2 < z < 1.2$ in the PRIMUS spectroscopic redshift survey. There is a wide range of SFR at a given $L_X$, and we do not find a significant correlation between SFR and the observed instantaneous $L_X$ for star forming galaxies. However, there is a weak but significant correlation between the mean $L_\mathrm{X}$ of detected AGN and SFR, which likely reflects that $L_\mathrm{X}$ varies on shorter timescales than SFR. We also find no correlation between stellar mass and AGN luminosity. AGN are found in star forming and quiescent galaxies, and both galaxy populations have a similar power-law distribution in the probability of hosting an AGN as a function of specific accretion rate. However, a higher fraction of AGN hosts are classified as star forming with increasing $L_\mathrm{X}$, and a star forming galaxy is $\sim2-3$ times more likely to host an AGN of a given specific accretion rate than a quiescent galaxy of the same stellar mass. The probability of a galaxy hosting an AGN remains constant across the main sequence of star formation. These results indicate that there is an underlying connection between star formation and the presence of AGN, but AGN are also widespread in quiescent galaxies.
    07/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We report a detection of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature in the flux-correlation function of the Ly{\alpha} forest of high-redshift quasars with a statistical significance of five standard deviations. The study uses 137,562 quasars in the redshift range $2.1\le z \le 3.5$ from the Data Release 11 (DR11) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of SDSS-III. This sample contains three times the number of quasars used in previous studies. The measured position of the BAO peak determines the angular distance, $D_A(z=2.34)$ and expansion rate, $H(z=2.34)$, both on a scale set by the sound horizon at the drag epoch, $r_d$. We find $D_A/r_d=11.28\pm0.65(1\sigma)^{+2.8}_{-1.2}(2\sigma)$ and $D_H/r_d=9.18\pm0.28(1\sigma)\pm0.6(2\sigma)$ where $D_H=c/H$. The optimal combination, $\sim D_H^{0.7}D_A^{0.3}/r_d$ is determined with a precision of $\sim2\%$. For the value $r_d=147.4~{\rm Mpc}$, consistent with the CMB power spectrum measured by Planck, we find $D_A(z=2.34)=1662\pm96(1\sigma)~{\rm Mpc}$ and $H(z=2.34)=222\pm7(1\sigma)~{\rm km\,s^{-1}Mpc^{-1}}$. Tests with mock catalogs and variations of our analysis procedure have revealed no systematic uncertainties comparable to our statistical errors. Our results agree with the previously reported BAO measurement at the same redshift using the quasar-Ly{\alpha} forest cross-correlation. The auto-correlation and cross-correlation approaches are complementary because of the quite different impact of redshift-space distortion on the two measurements. The combined constraints from the two correlation functions imply values of $D_A/r_d$ and $D_H/r_d$ that are, respectively, 7% low and 7% high compared to the predictions of a flat $\Lambda$CDM cosmological model with the best-fit Planck parameters. With our estimated statistical errors, the significance of this discrepancy is $\approx 2.5\sigma$.
    04/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the luminosity and colour dependence of clustering of CMASS galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Tenth Data Release. The halo occupation distribution framework is adopted to model the projected two-point correlation function measurements on small and intermediate scales (from $0.02$ to $60\,h^{-1}{\rm {Mpc}}$) and to interpret the observed trends and infer the connection of galaxies to dark matter halos. We find that luminous red galaxies reside in massive halos of mass $M{\sim}10^{13}$--$10^{14}\,h^{-1}{\rm M_\odot}$ and more luminous galaxies are more clustered and hosted by more massive halos. The strong small-scale clustering requires a fraction of these galaxies to be satellites in massive halos, with the fraction at the level of 5--8 per cent and decreasing with luminosity. The characteristic mass of a halo hosting on average one satellite galaxy above a luminosity threshold is about a factor $8.7$ larger than that of a halo hosting a central galaxy above the same threshold. At a fixed luminosity, progressively redder galaxies are more strongly clustered on small scales, which can be explained by having a larger fraction of these galaxies in the form of satellites in massive halos. Our clustering measurements on scales below $0.4\,h^{-1}{\rm {Mpc}}$ allow us to study the small-scale spatial distribution of satellites inside halos. While the clustering of luminosity-threshold samples can be well described by a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile, that of the reddest galaxies prefers a steeper or more concentrated profile. Finally, we also use galaxy samples of constant number density at different redshifts to study the evolution of luminous galaxies, and find the clustering to be consistent with passive evolution in the redshift range of $0.5 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.6$.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the distance measurement to z = 0.32 using the 11th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Acoustic Oscillation Survey (BOSS). We use 313,780 galaxies of the low-redshift (LOWZ) sample over 7,341 square-degrees to compute $D_V = (1264 \pm 25)(r_d/r_{d,fid})$ - a sub 2% measurement - using the baryon acoustic feature measured in the galaxy two-point correlation function and power-spectrum. We compare our results to those obtained in DR10. We study observational systematics in the LOWZ sample and quantify potential effects due to photometric offsets between the northern and southern Galactic caps. We find the sample to be robust to all systematic effects found to impact on the targeting of higher-redshift BOSS galaxies, and that the observed north-south tensions can be explained by either limitations in photometric calibration or by sample variance, and have no impact on our final result. Our measurement, combined with the baryonic acoustic scale at z = 0.57, is used in Anderson et al. (2013a) to constrain cosmological parameters.
    01/2014; 440(3).
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    ABSTRACT: I present small-scale galaxy cross-correlation measurements from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) as a function of color, luminosity, and redshift. We measure the real-space clustering of ~50,000 galaxies from PRIMUS, over a redshift range 0.2 < z < 1, by cross-correlating spectroscopic PRIMUS galaxies with a tracer population of galaxies selected from imaging catalogs. In agreement with previous work, we find strong clustering differences between blue and red galaxy populations. Our results indicate luminosity-dependent clustering, but this luminosity dependence further varies depending on color and physical scale. We interpret our results using a halo abundance model.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: I will discuss two observational projects related to galaxy and active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution at z < 1. First I will present a statistical study of the morphologies of galaxies in which star formation is being shut down or quenched; this has implications for how red, elliptical galaxies are formed. I will discuss the physical processes behind star formation quenching from the morphological transformations that galaxies undergo during this process. Then I will focus on multi-wavelength AGN selection methods and tie together disparate results in the literature. Several IR-AGN selection methods have been developed using Spitzer/IRAC data in order to supplement traditional X-ray AGN selection; I will characterize the uniqueness and complementarity of these methods as a function of both IR and X-ray depth. I will use data from the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS) to compare the efficiency of IR and X-ray AGN selection and discuss the properties of the AGN and host galaxy populations of each. Finally, I will briefly mention ongoing work to compare the clustering of observed IR and X-ray AGN samples relative to stellar mass-matched galaxy samples.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the cosmic distance scale as measured from the detection of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of galaxies from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our analysis of the Data Release 11 sample uses 1.15 million massive galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts spanning redshift 0.15 to 0.70 and covering 8500 square degrees. We find strong detections of the acoustic peak signature in two redshift bins centered at z=0.32 and z=0.57; in the upper redshift, the detection significance exceeds 8-sigma. These detections produce a robust measurement of the cosmic distance scale at these redshifts, including a 1% measurement of the distance to z=0.57. We discuss the cosmological implications of the measurements, including combinations with cosmic microwave background anisotropy data sets.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present improved methodology for including covariance matrices in the error budget of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy clustering measurements, revisiting Data Release 9 (DR9) analyses, and describing a method that is used in DR10/11 analyses presented in companion papers. The precise analysis method adopted is becoming increasingly important, due to the precision that BOSS can now reach: even using as many as 600 mock catalogues to estimate covariance of 2-point clustering measurements can still lead to an increase in the errors of ~20%, depending on how the cosmological parameters of interest are measured. In this paper we extend previous work on this contribution to the error budget, deriving formulae for errors measured by integrating over the likelihood, and to the distribution of recovered best-fit parameters fitting the simulations also used to estimate the covariance matrix. Both are situations that previous analyses of BOSS have considered. We apply the formulae derived to Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) and Redshift-Space Distortion (RSD) measurements from BOSS in our companion papers. To further aid these analyses, we consider the optimum number of bins to use for 2-point measurements using the monopole power spectrum or correlation function for BAO, and the monopole and quadrupole moments of the correlation function for anisotropic-BAO and RSD measurements.
    12/2013; 439(3).
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    ABSTRACT: Extraction of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) to percent level accuracy is challenging and demands an understanding of many potential systematic to an accuracy well below 1 per cent, in order ensure that they do not combine significantly when compared to statistical error of the BAO measurement. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) SDSS Data Release Eleven (DR11) reaches a distance measurement with $\sim 1\%$ statistical error and this prompts an extensive search for all possible sub-percent level systematic errors which could be safely ignored previously. In this paper, we analyze the potential systematics in BAO fitting methodology using mocks and data from BOSS DR10 and DR11. We demonstrate the robustness of the fiducial multipole fitting methodology to be at $0.1\%-0.2\%$ level with a wide range of tests in mock galaxy catalogs pre- and post-reconstruction. We also find the DR10 and DR11 data from BOSS to be robust against changes in methodology at similar level. This systematic error budget is incorporated into the the error budget of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR10 and DR11 BAO measurements. Of the wide range of changes we have investigated, we find that when fitting pre-reconstructed data or mocks, the following changes have the largest effect on the best fit values of distance measurements both parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight: (a) Changes in non-linear correlation function template; (b) Changes in fitting range of the correlation function; (c) Changes to the non-linear damping model parameters. The priors applied do not matter in the estimates of the fitted errors as long as we restrict ourselves to physically meaningful fitting regions.[abridged]
    12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We explore the cosmological implications of the angle-averaged correlation function, xi(s), and the clustering wedges, xi_perp(s) and xi_para(s), of the LOWZ and CMASS galaxy samples from Data Release 10 and 11 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. Our results show no significant evidence for a deviation from the standard LCDM model. The combination of the information from our clustering measurements with recent data from the cosmic microwave background is sufficient to constrain the curvature of the Universe to Omega_k = 0.0010 +- 0.0029, the total neutrino mass to Sum m_nu < 0.23 eV (95% confidence level), the effective number of relativistic species to N_eff=3.31 +- 0.27, and the dark energy equation of state to w_DE = -1.051 +- 0.076. These limits are further improved by adding information from type Ia supernovae and baryon acoustic oscillations from other samples. In particular, this data set combination is completely consistent with a time-independent dark energy equation of state, in which case we find w_DE=-1.024 +- 0.052. We explore the constraints on the growth-rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z)=Omega_m(z)^gamma and obtain gamma=0.69 +- 0.15, in agreement with the predictions from general relativity of gamma=0.55.
    12/2013; 440(3).
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    ABSTRACT: With the largest spectroscopic galaxy survey volume drawn from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we can extract cosmological constraints from the measurements of redshift and geometric distortions at quasi-linear scales (e.g. above 50 Mpc/h), which can be modeled by perturbation theory. We analyze the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the BOSS Data Release 11 (DR11) CMASS galaxy sample, at the effective redshift z=0.57, to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance D_A(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)\sigma_8(z), and the physical matter density \Omega_mh^2. We provide accurate measurements on {H^{-1}R_{fid}^{-1.0}, D_A R_{fid}^{-0.96}, f\sigma_8(\Omega_m h^2)^{0.45}}, where R_{fid}\equiv r_s/r_{s,fid}, r_s is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch, and r_{s,fid} is the sound scale of the fiducial cosmology used in this study. We also extract cosmological constraints from BOSS DR11 LOWZ sample, at the effective redshift z=0.32, by including small scales (e.g., down to 30 Mpc/h), and model small scales with Finger of God effect. The parameters which are not well constrained by our galaxy clustering analysis are marginalized over with wide flat priors. Since no priors from other data sets, e.g., cosmic microwave background (CMB), are adopted and no dark energy models are assumed, our results from BOSS CMASS and LOWZ galaxy clustering alone may be combined with other data sets, i.e., CMB, SNe, lensing or other galaxy clustering data to constrain the parameters of a given cosmological model. We find the redshift distortion measurements from most of the galaxy clustering analyses (including this study) favor WMAP9 than Planck and favor wCDM than \LambdaCDM or o\LambdaCDM. The uncertainty on the dark energy equation of state parameter from CMB+CMASS is about 8 per cent.
    12/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: We use the observed anisotropic clustering of galaxies in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 11 CMASS sample to measure the linear growth rate of structure, the Hubble expansion rate and the comoving distance scale. Our sample covers 8498 ${\rm deg}^2$ and encloses an effective volume of 6.0 ${\rm Gpc}^3$ at an effective redshift of $\bar{z} = 0.57$. We find $f\sigma_8 = 0.441 \pm 0.044$, $H = 93.1 \pm 3.0\ {\mathrm{km}\ \mathrm{s}^{-1} \mathrm{Mpc}^{-1}}$ and $D_{\rm A} = 1380 \pm 23\ {\rm Mpc}$ when fitting the growth and expansion rate simultaneously. When we fix the background expansion to the one predicted by spatially-flat $\Lambda$CDM model in agreement with recent Planck results, we find $f\sigma_8 = 0.447 \pm 0.028$ (6 per cent accuracy). While our measurements are generally consistent with the predictions of $\Lambda$CDM and General Relativity, they mildly favor models in which the strength of gravitational interactions is weaker than what is predicted by General Relativity. Combining our measurements with recent cosmic microwave background data results in tight constraints on basic cosmological parameters and deviations from the standard cosmological model. Separately varying these parameters, we find $w = -0.983 \pm 0.075$ (8 per cent accuracy) and $\gamma = 0.69 \pm 0.11$ (16 per cent accuracy) for the effective equation of state of dark energy and the growth rate index, respectively. Both constraints are in good agreement with the standard model values of $w=-1$ and $\gamma = 0.554$.
    12/2013; 439(4).
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    ABSTRACT: We analyse the anisotropic clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) CMASS Data Release 11 (DR11) sample, which consists of $690\,827$ galaxies in the redshift range $0.43 < z < 0.7$ and has a sky coverage of $8\,498\,$deg$^2$. We perform our analysis in Fourier space using a power spectrum estimator suggested by Yamamoto et al. (2006). We measure the multipole power spectra in a self-consistent manner for the first time in the sense that we provide a proper way to treat the survey window function and the integral constraint, without the commonly used assumption of an isotropic power spectrum and without the need to split the survey into sub-regions. The main cosmological signals exploited in our analysis are the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations and the signal of redshift space distortions, both of which are distorted by the Alcock-Paczynski effect. Together, these signals allow us to constrain the distance ratio $D_V(z_{\rm eff})/r_s(z_d) = 13.89\pm 0.18$, the Alcock-Paczynski parameter $F_{\rm AP}(z_{\rm eff}) = 0.679\pm0.031$ and the growth rate of structure $f(z_{\rm eff})\sigma_8(z_{\rm eff}) = 0.419\pm0.044$ at the effective redshift $z_{\rm eff}=0.57$. Combining our dataset with Planck to test General Relativity (GR) through the simple $\gamma$-parameterisation, where the growth rate is given by $f(z) = \Omega^{\gamma}_m(z)$, reveals a $\sim 2\sigma$ tension between the data and the prediction by GR. The tension between our result and GR can be traced back to a tension in the clustering amplitude $\sigma_8$ between CMASS and Planck.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 12/2013; 443(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We measure the large-scale cross-correlation of quasars with the Lyman alpha forest absorption, using over 164,000 quasars from Data Release 11 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We extend the previous study of roughly 60,000 quasars from Data Release 9 to larger separations, allowing a measurement of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale along the line of sight $c/(H(z=2.36) ~ r_s) = 9.0 \pm 0.3$ and across the line of sight $D_A(z=2.36)~ / ~ r_s = 10.8 \pm 0.4$, consistent with CMB and other BAO data. Using the best fit value of the sound horizon from Planck data ($r_s=147.49 Mpc$), we can translate these results to a measurement of the Hubble parameter of $H(z=2.36) = 226 \pm 8 km/s$ and of the angular diameter distance of $D_A(z=2.36) = 1590 \pm 60 Mpc$. The measured cross-correlation function and an update of the code to fit the BAO scale (baofit) are made publicly available.
    Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics 11/2013; 2014(05). · 6.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We study the clustering of galaxies, as a function of their colour, from Data Release Ten (DR10) of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We select 122,967 galaxies with 0.43 < z < 0.7 into a "Blue" sample and 131,969 into a "Red" sample based on k+e corrected (to z=0.55) r-i colours and i band magnitudes. The samples are chosen to each contain more than 100,000 galaxies, have similar redshift distributions, and maximize the difference in clustering amplitude. The Red sample has a 40% larger bias than the Blue (b_Red/b_Blue = 1.39+-0.04), implying the Red galaxies occupy dark matter halos with an average mass that is 0.5 log Mo greater. Spherically averaged measurements of the correlation function, \xi 0, and the power spectrum are used to locate the position of the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of both samples. Using \xi 0, we obtain distance scales, relative to our reference LCDM cosmology, of 1.010+-0.027 for the Red sample and 1.005+-0.031 for the Blue. After applying reconstruction, these measurements improve to 1.013+/-0.020 for the Red sample and 1.008+-0.026 for the Blue. For each sample, measurements of \xi 0 and the second multipole moment, \xi 2, of the anisotropic correlation function are used to determine the rate of structure growth, parameterized by f\sigma 8. We find f\sigma 8,Red = 0.511+-0.083, f\sigma 8,Blue = 0.509+/-0.085, and f\sigma 8,Cross = 0.423+-0.061 (from the cross-correlation between the Red and Blue samples). We use the covariance between the bias and growth measurements obtained from each sample and their cross-correlation to produce an optimally-combined measurement of f\sigma 8,comb = 0.443+-0.055. In no instance do we detect significant differences in distance scale or structure growth measurements obtained from the Blue and Red samples.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2013; 437(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present measurements of the luminosity and color-dependence of galaxy clustering at 0.2<z<1.0 in the PRIsm MUlti-object Survey (PRIMUS). We quantify the clustering with the redshift-space and projected two-point correlation functions, xi(rp,pi) and wp(rp), using volume-limited samples constructed from a parent sample of over 130,000 galaxies with robust redshifts in seven independent fields covering 9 sq. deg. of sky. We quantify how the scale-dependent clustering amplitude increases with increasing luminosity and redder color, with relatively small errors over large volumes. We find that red galaxies have stronger small-scale (0.1<rp<1 Mpc/h) clustering and steeper correlation functions compared to blue galaxies, as well as a strong color dependent clustering within the red sequence alone. We interpret our measured clustering trends in terms of galaxy bias and obtain values between b_gal=0.9-2.5, quantifying how galaxies are biased tracers of dark matter depending on their luminosity and color. We also interpret the color dependence with mock catalogs, and find that the clustering of blue galaxies is nearly constant with color, while redder galaxies have stronger clustering in the one-halo term due to a higher satellite galaxy fraction. In addition, we measure the evolution of the clustering strength and bias, and we do not detect statistically significant departures from passive evolution. We argue that the luminosity- and color-environment (or halo mass) relations of galaxies have not significantly evolved since z=1. Finally, using jackknife subsampling methods, we find that sampling fluctuations are important and that the COSMOS field is generally an outlier, due to having more overdense structures than other fields; we find that 'cosmic variance' can be a significant source of uncertainty for high-redshift clustering measurements.
    10/2013; 784(2).

Publication Stats

15k Citations
1,445.03 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008–2014
    • Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
    • New Mexico State University
      Las Cruces, New Mexico, United States
  • 2013
    • Siena College
      • Department Physics and Astronomy
      Troy, New York, United States
    • Michigan State University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      East Lansing, Michigan, United States
  • 2001–2013
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Astronomy
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 1995–2013
    • Harvard University
      • Department of Astronomy
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2012
    • University of Utah
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
    • Nanjing University
      • Department of Astronomy
      Nan-ching, Jiangsu Sheng, China
    • Cea Leti
      Grenoble, Rhône-Alpes, France
    • Cambridge College
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1999–2012
    • Carnegie Mellon University
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2011
    • United States Naval Observatory
      Washington, Maine, United States
  • 2007–2011
    • The Ohio State University
      • • Center for Cosmology and Astoparticle Physics
      • • Department of Astronomy
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Department of Astronomy
      Urbana, Illinois, United States
    • Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab)
      • Center for Particle Astrophysics
      Batavia, Illinois, United States
  • 2010
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2005–2009
    • Eötvös Loránd University
      • Department of Physics of Complex Systems
      Budapeŝto, Budapest, Hungary
  • 1997–2009
    • Institute for Advanced Study
      Princeton Junction, New Jersey, United States
  • 2007–2008
    • Johns Hopkins University
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2000–2008
    • University of Chicago
      • Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics
      Chicago, IL, United States
  • 2006
    • University of Toronto
      • Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics
      Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    • University of Wyoming
      Laramie, Wyoming, United States
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Astronomy
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2003
    • The University of Tokyo
      • Department of Physics
      Tokyo, Tokyo-to, Japan
    • University of Pittsburgh
      • Physics and Astronomy
      Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States