C R Leman

Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States

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Publications (3)5.1 Total impact

  • S P Reddy, C R Leman, J E Marks, B Emami
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the nutritional benefit of parotid-sparing irradiation, comparing the body weights of patients irradiated with parotid-sparing technique versus those irradiated with bilateral opposed photon beams, including both parotid glands in the radiation fields. One hundred fourteen patients with cancer of the oral cavity were irradiated with curative intent. Two-dimensional radiotherapy techniques sparing at least one parotid gland from the radiation beams were used to treat 31 patients (parotid-sparing techniques). Eighty-three patients were irradiated using bilateral opposed photon beams, which included both parotid glands (bilateral technique). Body weight during and after irradiation, treatment outcome, and survival were compared. Patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques maintained their nutritional intake and baseline body weight during and after irradiation. Patients treated with the bilateral technique that included both parotid glands had poor nutritional intake, leading to a more than 10% decline in their initial body weight; these patients did not regain their body weight during the 2-year follow-up period. Primary tumor control rate was higher for patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques than for patients who had both parotid glands irradiated (70% versus 48%; p = 0.05). This difference is because a higher percentage of patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques had early-stage tumors (54%) compared with patients treated with the bilateral technique (24%). When analyzed according to the tumor stage, the primary tumor control rates for patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques and for patients treated with the bilateral technique showed no difference; control rates were 93% and 87% (p = 1.00) for early-stage tumors and 42% and 36% (p = 0.75) for advanced-stage tumors, respectively. Nodal control rates in the ipsilateral side of the neck and in the contralateral side of the neck for patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques and with the bilateral technique were not significantly different-74% versus 76% (p = 0.86) and 70% versus 82% (p = 0.21), respectively. Sparing at least one parotid gland during irradiation of patients with head and neck cancer will preserve parotid function and prevent xerostomia. Patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques were able to maintain their oral nutrition and body weight, compared with patients who had both parotid glands irradiated. A higher percentage of patients treated with parotid-sparing techniques had early-stage tumors, resulting in higher rates of primary tumor control and survival in this group of patients.
    American Journal of Clinical Oncology 09/2001; 24(4):341-6. · 2.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of p53 overexpression in the development of stomal recurrence was studied in patients with T1 glottic cancer who had undergone salvage laryngectomy after primary radiotherapy failure (first recurrence). The role of subglottic extension of the recurrent tumor in the development of stomal recurrence was also studied. One hundred fourteen patients with T1 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottic larynx were irradiated with curative intent. A local recurrence (first recurrence) developed in 23 patients (20%), and salvage laryngectomy was performed for 20 of these patients. No postlaryngectomy radiation therapy was included in the treatment of recurrences. Several risk factors thought to be significant in the development of stomal recurrence were analyzed in these 20 patients. Prognostic factors analyzed include: p53 overexpression in the preradiation biopsy specimen, subglottic extension of the first recurrence, thyroid cartilage and lymph node involvement at the time of first recurrence, emergency tracheostomy performed before salvage laryngectomy, and the laryngectomy procedure performed for first recurrence. Presence of p53 protein in the preradiation biopsy specimen of laryngeal cancer did not show any adverse effect on the development of stomal recurrence. Stomal recurrence developed in 27% of patients with positive biopsies and in 20% of patients with negative biopsies (p = 1.00). Subglottic extension of the first recurrence was associated with an increased incidence of stomal recurrence. Rates of stomal recurrence were 6% in patients without subglottic extension and 100% in patients with subglottic extension (p = 0.001). All other risk factors studied showed no effect on stomal recurrence. In this study, p53 overexpression showed no effect on the development of stomal recurrence after salvage laryngectomy in patients with T1 glottic cancer. Conversely, subglottic extension of the recurrence was found to be strongly associated with stomal recurrence. All other factors analyzed showed no effect on stomal recurrence.
    American Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/2001; 24(2):124-7. · 2.55 Impact Factor
  • International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics - INT J RADIAT ONCOL BIOL PHYS. 01/1999; 45(3):275-275.

Publication Stats

13 Citations
5.10 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001
    • Loyola University
      New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
    • Loyola University Chicago
      Chicago, Illinois, United States