F. Bouchy

Aix-Marseille Université, Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France

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Publications (474)1236.18 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: High-precision radial velocity surveys explore the population of low-mass exoplanets orbiting bright stars. This allows accurately deriving their orbital parameters such as their occurrence rate and the statistical distribution of their properties. Based on this, models of planetary formation and evolution can be constrained. The SOPHIE spectrograph has been continuously improved in past years, and thanks to an appropriate correction of systematic instrumental drift, it is now reaching 2 m/s precision in radial velocity measurements on all timescales. As part of a dedicated radial velocity survey devoted to search for low-mass planets around a sample of 190 bright solar-type stars in the northern hemisphere, we report the detection of a warm Neptune with a minimum mass of 16.1 +- 2.7 Mearth orbiting the solar analog HD164595 in 40 +- 0.24 days . We also revised the parameters of the multiplanetary system around HD190360. We discuss this new detection in the context of the upcoming space mission CHEOPS, which is devoted to a transit search of bright stars harboring known exoplanets.
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    ABSTRACT: The statistical validation of transiting exoplanets proved to be an efficient technique to secure the nature of small exoplanet signals which cannot be established by purely spectroscopic means. However, the spectroscopic diagnoses are providing us with useful constraints on the presence of blended stellar contaminants. In this paper, we present how a contaminating star affects the measurements of the various spectroscopic diagnoses as function of the parameters of the target and contaminating stars using the model implemented into the PASTIS planet-validation software. We find particular cases for which a blend might produce a large radial velocity signal but no bisector variation. It might also produce a bisector variation anti-correlated with the radial velocity one, as in the case of stellar spots. In those cases, the full width half maximum variation provides complementary constraints. These results can be used to constrain blend scenarios for transiting planet candidates or radial velocity planets. We review all the spectroscopic diagnoses reported in the literature so far, especially the ones to monitor the line asymmetry. We estimate their uncertainty and compare their sensitivity to blends. Based on that, we recommend the use of BiGauss which is the most sensitive diagnosis to monitor line-profile asymmetry. In this paper, we also investigate the sensitivity of the radial velocities to constrain blend scenarios and develop a formalism to estimate the level of dilution of a blended signal. Finally, we apply our blend model to re-analyse the spectroscopic diagnoses of HD16702, an unresolved face-on binary which exhibits bisector variations.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 05/2015; 451(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stv1080 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Context. We present the discovery of two transiting extrasolar planets by the satellite CoRoT. Aims. We aim at a characterization of the planetary bulk parameters, which allow us to further investigate the formation and evolution of the planetary systems and the main properties of the host stars. Methods. We used the transit light curve to characterize the planetary parameters relative to the stellar parameters. The analysis of HARPS spectra established the planetary nature of the detections, providing their masses. Further photometric and spectroscopic ground-based observations provided stellar parameters (log g,Teff,v sin i) to characterize the host stars. Our model takes the geometry of the transit to constrain the stellar density into account, which when linked to stellar evolutionary models, determines the bulk parameters of the star. Because of the asymmetric shape of the light curve of one of the planets, we had to include the possibility in our model that the stellar surface was not strictly spherical. Results. We present the planetary parameters of CoRoT-28b, a Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.484+/-0.087MJup; radius 0.955+/-0.066RJup) orbiting an evolved star with an orbital period of 5.208 51 +/- 0.000 38 days, and CoRoT-29b, another Jupiter-sized planet (mass 0.85 +/- 0.20MJup; radius 0.90 +/- 0.16RJup) orbiting an oblate star with an orbital period of 2.850 570 +/- 0.000 006 days. The reason behind the asymmetry of the transit shape is not understood at this point. Conclusions. These two new planetary systems have very interesting properties and deserve further study, particularly in the case of the star CoRoT-29.
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    ABSTRACT: The K2 mission has recently begun to discover new and diverse planetary systems. In December 2014 Campaign 1 data from the mission was released, providing high-precision photometry for ~22000 objects over an 80 day timespan. We searched these data with the aim of detecting further important new objects. Our search through two separate pipelines led to the independent discovery of EPIC201505350, a two-planet system of Neptune sized objects (4.2 and 7.2 $R_\oplus$), orbiting a K dwarf extremely close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The two planets each show transits, sometimes simultaneously due to their proximity to resonance and alignment of conjunctions. We obtain further ground based photometry of the larger planet with the NITES telescope, demonstrating the presence of large transit timing variations (TTVs) of over an hour. These TTVs allows us to confirm the planetary nature of the system, and place a limit on the mass of the outer planet of $386M_\oplus$.
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    ABSTRACT: We report the validation and characterization of three new transiting exoplanets using SOPHIE radial velocities: KOI-614b, KOI-206b, and KOI-680b. KOI-614b has a mass of $2.86\pm0.35~{\rm M_{Jup}}$ and a radius of $1.13^{+0.26}_{-0.18}~{\rm R_{Jup}}$, and it orbits a G0, metallic ([Fe/H]=$0.35\pm0.15$) dwarf in 12.9 days. Its mass and radius are familiar and compatible with standard planetary evolution models, so it is one of the few known transiting planets in this mass range to have an orbital period over ten days. With an equilibrium temperature of $T_{eq}=1000 \pm 45$ K, this places KOI-614b at the transition between what is usually referred to as "hot" and "warm" Jupiters. KOI-206b has a mass of $2.82\pm 0.52~{\rm M_{Jup}}$ and a radius of $1.45\pm0.16~{\rm R_{Jup}}$, and it orbits a slightly evolved F7-type star in a 5.3-day orbit. It is a massive inflated hot Jupiter that is particularly challenging for planetary models because it requires unusually large amounts of additional dissipated energy in the planet. On the other hand, KOI-680b has a much lower mass of $0.84\pm0.15~{\rm M_{Jup}}$ and requires less extra-dissipation to explain its uncommonly large radius of $1.99\pm0.18~{\rm R_{Jup}}$. It is one of the biggest transiting planets characterized so far, and it orbits a subgiant F9-star well on its way to the red giant stage, with an orbital period of 8.6 days. With host stars of masses of $1.46\pm0.17~M_{\odot}$ and $1.54 \pm 0.09~M_{\odot}$, respectively, KOI-206b, and KOI-680b are interesting objects for theories of formation and survival of short-period planets around stars more massive than the Sun. For those two targets, we also find signs of a possible distant additional companion in the system.
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of the transiting hot Jupiter exoplanet WASP-85Ab. Using a combined analysis of spectroscopic and photometric data, we determine that the planet orbits its host star every 2.66 days, and has a mass of 1.09+/-0.03 M_Jup and a radius of 1.44+/-0.02 R_Jup. The host star is of G5 spectral type, with magnitude V=11.2, and lies 125+/-80 pc distant. We find stellar parameters of T_eff=5685+/-65 K, super-solar metallicity ([Fe/H]=0.08+/-0.10), M_star=1.04+/-0.07 M_sun and R_star=0.96+/-0.13 R_sun. The system has a K-dwarf binary companion, WASP-85B, at a separation of approximately 1.5". The close proximity of this companion leads to contamination of our photometry, decreasing the apparent transit depth that we account for during our analysis. Without this correction, we find the depth to be 50 percent smaller, the stellar density to be 32 percent smaller, and the planet radius to be 18 percent smaller than the true value. Many of our radial velocity observations are also contaminated; these are disregarded when analysing the system in favour of the uncontaminated HARPS observations, as they have reduced semi-amplitudes that lead to underestimated planetary masses. We find a long-term trend in the binary position angle, indicating a misalignment between the binary and orbital planes. WASP observations of the system show variability with a period of 14.64 days, indicative of rotational modulation caused by stellar activity. Analysis of the Ca ii H+K lines shows strong emission that implies that both binary components are strongly active. We find that the system is likely to be less than a few Gyr old. WASP-85 lies in the field of view of K2 Campaign 1. Long cadence observations of the planet clearly show the planetary transits, along with the signature of stellar variability. Analysis of the K2 data, both long and short cadence, is ongoing.
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    ABSTRACT: We describe radial-velocity time series obtained by HARPS on the 3.60 m telescope in La Silla (ESO, Chile) over ten years and report the discovery of five new giant exoplanets in distant orbits; these new planets orbit the stars HD 564, HD 30669, HD 108341, and BD-114672. Their periods range from 492 to 1684 days, semi-major axes range from 1.2 to 2.69 AU, and eccentricities range from 0 to 0.85. Their minimum mass ranges from 0.33 to 3.5 Mjup. We also refine the parameters of two planets announced previously around HD 113538, based on a longer series of measurements. The planets have a period of 663+-8 and 1818+-25 days, orbital eccentricities of 0.14+-0.08 and 0.20+-0.04, and minimum masses of 0.36+-0.04 and 0.93+-0.06 Mjup. Finally, we report the discovery of a new hot-Jupiter planet around an active star, HD 103720; the planet has a period of 4.5557+-0.0001 days and a minimum mass of 0.62+-0.025 Mjup. We discuss the fundamental parameters of these systems and limitations due to stellar activity in quiet stars with typical 2m/s radial velocity precision.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 12/2014; DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424965 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Exoplanet science is booming. In 20 years our knowledge has expanded considerably, from the first discovery of a Hot Jupiter, to the detection of a large population of Neptunes and super-Earths, to the first steps toward the characterization of exoplanet atmospheres. Between today and 2025, the field will evolve at an even faster pace with the advent of several space-based transit search missions, ground-based spectrographs, high-contrast imaging facilities, and the James Webb Space Telescope. Especially the ESA M-class PLATO mission will be a game changer in the field. From 2024 onwards, PLATO will find transiting terrestrial planets orbiting within the habitable zones of nearby, bright stars. These objects will require the power of Extremely Large Telescopes (ELTs) to be characterized further. The technique of ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy is establishing itself as a crucial pathway to measure chemical composition, atmospheric structure and atmospheric circulation in transiting exoplanets. A high-resolution spectrograph covering the visible and near-IR domains, mounted on the European ELT, will be able to detect molecules such as water vapour, carbon dioxide and oxygen in the atmospheres of habitable planets under favourable circumstances. E-ELT HiRES is the perfect ground-based match to the PLATO space mission and represents a unique opportunity for Europe to lead the world into the era of exploration of exoplanets with habitable conditions. HiRES will also be extremely complementary to other E-ELT planned instruments specialising in different kinds of planets, such as METIS and EPICS.
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    ABSTRACT: Context. Planetary companions of a fixed mass induce larger amplitude reflex motions around lower-mass stars, which helps make M dwarfs excellent targets for extra-solar planet searches. State of the art velocimeters with $\sim$1m/s stability can detect very low-mass planets out to the habitable zone of these stars. Low-mass, small, planets are abundant around M dwarfs, and most known potentially habitable planets orbit one of these cool stars. Aims. Our M-dwarf radial velocity monitoring with HARPS on the ESO 3.6m telescope at La Silla observatory makes a major contribution to this sample. Methods. We present here dense radial velocity (RV) time series for three M dwarfs observed over $\sim5$ years: GJ 3293 (0.42M$_\odot$), GJ 3341 (0.47M$_\odot$), and GJ 3543 (0.45M$_\odot$). We extract those RVs through minimum $\chi^2$ matching of each spectrum against a high S/N ratio stack of all observed spectra for the same star. We then vet potential orbital signals against several stellar activity indicators, to disentangle the Keplerian variations induced by planets from the spurious signals which result from rotational modulation of stellar surface inhomogeneities and from activity cycles. Results. Two Neptune-mass planets - $msin(i)=1.4\pm0.1$ and $1.3\pm0.1M_{nept}$ - orbit GJ 3293 with periods $P=30.60\pm0.02$ d and $P=123.98\pm0.38$ d, possibly together with a super-Earth - $msin(i)\sim7.9\pm1.4M_\oplus$ - with period $P=48.14\pm0.12\;d$. A super-Earth - $msin(i)\sim6.1M_\oplus$ - orbits GJ 3341 with $P=14.207\pm0.007\;d$. The RV variations of GJ 3543, on the other hand, reflect its stellar activity rather than planetary signals.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 11/2014; DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424253 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: As part of our follow-up campaign of Kepler planets, we observed Kepler-117 with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence. This F8-type star hosts two transiting planets in non-resonant orbits. The planets, Kepler-117 b and c, have orbital periods $\simeq 18.8$ and $\simeq 50.8$ days, and show transit-timing variations (TTVs) of several minutes. We performed a combined Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) fit on transits, radial velocities, and stellar parameters to constrain the characteristics of the system. We included the fit of the TTVs in the MCMC by modeling them with dynamical simulations. In this way, consistent posterior distributions were drawn for the system parameters. According to our analysis, planets b and c have notably different masses ($0.094 \pm 0.033$ and $1.84 \pm 0.18$ M$_{\rm J}$) and low orbital eccentricities ($0.0493 \pm 0.0062$ and $0.0323 \pm 0.0033$). The uncertainties on the derived parameters are strongly reduced if the fit of the TTVs is included in the combined MCMC. The TTVs allow measuring the mass of planet b, although its radial velocity amplitude is poorly constrained. Finally, we checked that the best solution is dynamically stable.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 11/2014; DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424591 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the radial-velocity follow-up of two Kepler planetary transiting candidates (KOI-189 and KOI-686) carried out with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute Provence. These data promptly discard these objects as viable planet candidates and show that the transiting objects are in the regime of very low-mass stars, where a strong discrepancy between observations and models persists for the mass and radius parameters. By combining the SOPHIE spectra with the Kepler light curve and photometric measurements found in the literature, we obtain a full characterization of the transiting companions, their orbits, and their host stars. The two companions are in significantly eccentric orbits with relatively long periods (30 days and 52.5 days), which makes them suitable objects for a comparison with theoretical models, since the effects invoked to understand the discrepancy with observations are weaker for these orbital distances. KOI-189 B has a mass M = 0.0745 +/- 0.0033 Msun and a radius R = 0.1025 +/- 0.0024 Rsun. The density of KOI-189 B is significantly lower than expected from theoretical models for a system of its age. We explore possible explanations for this difference. KOI-189 B is the smallest hydrogen-burning star with such a precise determination of its fundamental parameters. KOI-686 B is larger and more massive (M = 0.0915 +/- 0.0043 Msun; R = 0.1201 +/- 0.0033 Rsun), and its position in the mass-radius diagram agrees well with theoretical expectations.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 10/2014; 572. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424406 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The characterization of four new transiting extrasolar planets is presented here. KOI-188b and KOI-195b are bloated hot Saturns, with orbital periods of 3.8 and 3.2 days, and masses of 0.25 and 0.34 M_Jup, respectively. They are located in the low-mass range of known transiting, giant planets. KOI-192b has a similar mass (0.29 M_Jup) but a longer orbital period of 10.3 days. This places it in a domain where only few planets are known. KOI-830b, finally, with a mass of 1.27 M_Jup and a period of 3.5 days, is a typical hot Jupiter. The four planets have radii of 0.98, 1.09, 1.2, and 1.08 R_Jup, respectively. We detected no significant eccentricity in any of the systems, while the accuracy of our data does not rule out possible moderate eccentricities. The four objects were first identified by the Kepler Team as promising candidates from photometry of the Kepler satellite. We establish here their planetary nature thanks to the radial velocity follow-up we secured with the HARPS-N spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. The combined analyses of the whole datasets allow us to fully characterize the four planetary systems. These new objects increase the number of well-characterized exoplanets for statistics, and provide new targets for individual follow-up studies. The pre-screening we performed with the SOPHIE spectrograph at the Observatoire de Haute-Provence as part of that study also allowed us to conclude that a fifth candidate, KOI-219.01, is not a planet but is a false positive.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 09/2014; 572. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424268 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The CoRoT satellite has provided high-precision photometric light curves for more than 163 000 stars and found several hundreds of transiting systems compatible with a planetary scenario. If ground-based velocimetric observations are the best way to identify the actual planets among many possible configurations of eclipsing binary systems, recent transit surveys have shown that it is not always within reach of the radial-velocity detection limits. In this paper, we present a transiting exoplanet candidate discovered by CoRoT whose nature cannot be established from ground-based observations, and where extensive analyses are used to validate the planet scenario. They are based on observing constraints from radial-velocity spectroscopy, adaptive optics imaging and the CoRoT transit shape, as well as from priors on stellar populations, planet and multiple stellar systems frequency. We use the fully Bayesian approach developed in the pastis (Planet Analysis and Small Transit Investigation Software) analysis software, and conclude that the planet scenario is at least 1400 times more probable than any other false-positive scenario. The primary star is a metallic solar-like dwarf, with Ms = 1.099 ± 0.049 M⊙ and Rs = 1.136$^{+0.038}_{-0.090}$ R⊙. The validated planet has a radius of Rp = 4.88$^{+0.17}_{-0.39}$ R⊕ and mass less than 49 M⊕. Its mean density is smaller than 2.56 g cm−3 and orbital period is 9.7566 ± 0.0012 d. This object, called CoRoT-22 b, adds to a large number of validated Kepler planets. These planets do not have a proper measurement of the mass but allow statistical characterization of exoplanets population.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 08/2014; 444(3). DOI:10.1093/mnras/stu1645 · 5.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery from the WASP survey of two exoplanetary systems, each consisting of a Jupiter-sized planet transiting an 11th magnitude (V) main-sequence star. WASP-104b orbits its star in 1.75 d, whereas WASP-106b has the fourth-longest orbital period of any planet discovered by means of transits observed from the ground, orbiting every 9.29 d. Each planet is more massive than Jupiter (WASP-104b has a mass of $1.27 \pm 0.05~\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$, while WASP-106b has a mass of $1.93 \pm 0.08~\mathrm{M_{Jup}}$). Both planets are just slightly larger than Jupiter, with radii of $1.14 \pm 0.04$ and $1.09 \pm 0.04~\mathrm{R_{Jup}}$ for WASP-104 and WASP-106 respectively. No significant orbital eccentricity is detected in either system, and while this is not surprising in the case of the short-period WASP-104b, it is interesting in the case of WASP-106b, because many otherwise similar planets are known to have eccentric orbits.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 08/2014; 570. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201424752 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: CoRoT-7b, the first super-Earth with measured radius discovered, has opened the new field of rocky exoplanets characterisation. To better understand this interesting system, new observations were taken with the CoRoT satellite. During this run 90 new transits were obtained in the imagette mode. These were analysed together with the previous 151 transits obtained in the discovery run and HARPS radial velocity observations to derive accurate system parameters. A difference is found in the posterior probability distribution of the transit parameters between the previous CoRoT run (LRa01) and the new run (LRa06). We propose this is due to an extra noise component in the previous CoRoT run suspected to be transit spot occultation events. These lead to the mean transit shape becoming V-shaped. We show that the extra noise component is dominant at low stellar flux levels and reject these transits in the final analysis. We obtained a planetary radius, $R_p= 1.585\pm0.064\,R_{\oplus}$, in agreement with previous estimates. Combining the planetary radius with the new mass estimates results in a planetary density of $ 1.19 \pm 0.27\, \rho_{\oplus}$ which is consistent with a rocky composition. The CoRoT-7 system remains an excellent test bed for the effects of activity in the derivation of planetary parameters in the shallow transit regime.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 07/2014; 569. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201423939 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: SPIRou is a near-IR \'echelle spectropolarimeter and high-precision velocimeter under construction as a next-generation instrument for the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope. It is designed to cover a very wide simultaneous near-IR spectral range (0.98-2.35 {\mu}m) at a resolving power of 73.5K, providing unpolarized and polarized spectra of low-mass stars at a radial velocity (RV) precision of 1m/s. The main science goals of SPIRou are the detection of habitable super-Earths around low-mass stars and the study of how critically magnetic fields impact star / planet formation. Following a successful final design review in Spring 2014, SPIRou is now under construction and is scheduled to see first light in late 2017. We present an overview of key aspects of SPIRou's optical and mechanical design.
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    ABSTRACT: Optical velocimetry has led to the detection of more than 500 planets to date and there is a strong effort to push m/s velocimetry to the near-infrared to access cooler and lighter stars. The presence of numerous telluric absorption lines in the nIR brings an important challenge. As the star's barycentric velocity varies through the year, the telluric absorption lines effectively varies in velocity relative to the star's spectrum by the same amount leading to important systematic RV offsets. We present a novel principal component analysis-based approach for telluric line subtraction and demonstrated its effectiveness with archival HARPS data for GJ436 and {\tau} Ceti, over parts of the R-band that contain strong telluric absorption lines. The main results are: 1) a better RV accuracy with excluding only a few percentage of the domain, 2) better use of the entire spectrum to measure RV and 3) a higher telescope time efficency by using A0V telluric standard from telescope archive.
    Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering 06/2014; DOI:10.1117/12.2056385 · 0.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we report a new transiting warm giant planet: KOI-1257 b. It was first detected in photometry as a planet-candidate by the $\textit{Kepler}$ space telescope and then validated thanks to a radial velocity follow-up with the SOPHIE spectrograph. It orbits its host star with a period of 86.647661 d $\pm$ 3 s and a high eccentricity of 0.772 $\pm$ 0.045. The planet transits the main star of a metal-rich, relatively old binary system with stars of mass of 0.99 $\pm$ 0.05 Msun and 0.70 $ \pm $ 0.07 Msun for the primary and secondary (respectively). This binary system is constrained thanks to a self-consistent modelling of the $\textit{Kepler}$ transit light curve, the SOPHIE radial velocities, line bisector and full-width half maximum (FWHM) variations as well as the spectral energy distribution. However, future observations are needed to confirm it. The PASTIS fully-Bayesian software was used to validate the nature of the planet and to determine which star of the binary system is the transit host. By accounting for the dilution from the binary both in photometry and in radial velocity, we find that the planet has a mass of 1.45 $ \pm $ 0.35 Mjup, and a radius of 0.94 $ \pm $ 0.12 Rjup, and thus a bulk density of 2.1 $ \pm $ 1.2 g.cm$^{-3}$. The planet has an equilibrium temperature of 511 $\pm$ 50 K, making it one of the few known membre of the warm-jupiter population. The HARPS-N spectrograph was also used to observe a transit of KOI-1257 b, simultaneously with a joint amateur and professional photometric follow-up, with the aims at constraining the orbital obliquity of the planet. However, the Rossiter-McLaughlin was not clearly detected, resulting in poor constraints on the orbital obliquity of the planet.
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    Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 06/2014
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery of a candidate multiply-transiting system, the first one found in the CoRoT mission. Two transit-like features with periods of 5.11 and 11.76d are detected in the CoRoT light curve, around a main sequence K1V star of r=15.1. If the features are due to transiting planets around the same star, these would correspond to objects of 3.7$\pm$0.4 and 5.0$\pm$0.5 R_earth respectively. Several radial velocities serve to provide an upper limit of 5.7 M_earth for the 5.11~d signal, and to tentatively measure a mass of 28$^{+11}_{-11}$ M_earth for the object transiting with a 11.76~d period. These measurements imply low density objects, with a significant gaseous envelope. The detailed analysis of the photometric and spectroscopic data serve to estimate the probability that the observations are caused by transiting Neptune-sized planets as $>$26$\times$ higher than a blend scenario involving only one transiting planet, and $>$900$\times$ higher than a scenario involving two blends and no planets. The radial velocities show a long term modulation that might be attributed to a 1.5 M_jup planet orbiting at 1.8~A.U. from the host, but more data are required to determine the precise orbital parameters of this companion.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 06/2014; 567. DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201118662 · 4.48 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,236.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012–2015
    • Aix-Marseille Université
      • Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille (UMR 7326 LAM)
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2006–2014
    • Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6
      • Institut d'astrophysique de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
    • University of Coimbra
      Coímbra, Coimbra, Portugal
    • Universität Bern
      • Physics Institute
      Berna, Bern, Switzerland
    • Institut de France
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2001–2014
    • Observatoire de Haute-Provence
      Manosque, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 1999–2014
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      • • Observatoire de Paris
      • • Institut d'astrophysique spatiale (IAS)
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2013
    • University of Geneva
      Genève, Geneva, Switzerland
  • 2006–2013
    • Institut d'astrophysique de Paris
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2011
    • Polytech Paris-UPMC
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2007–2010
    • University of Porto
      • Departamento de Física e Astronomia
      Oporto, Porto, Portugal
    • University of Aveiro
      • Department of Physics
      Aveiro, Aveiro, Portugal
    • Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics
      • Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2008
    • Thüringer Landessternwarte Tautenburg
      Tautenburg, Thuringia, Germany
  • 2005–2007
    • Laboratoire d’Informatique Fondamentale de Marseille
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France
  • 2004–2005
    • University of Santiago, Chile
      CiudadSantiago, Santiago Metropolitan, Chile
    • University of Lisbon
      Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
    • Observatoire Astrophysique de Marseille Provence
      • Laboratory of Astrophysics of Marseille
      Marsiglia, Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, France