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Publications (16)35.3 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objective To describe the use, utility, safety, and effectiveness of the Proseal laryngeal mask for airway management in patients undergoing ventriculoperitoneal shunting.Patients and methodsWe retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients in whom the Proseal laryngeal mask was used during ventriculoperitoneal shunting between January 2006 and October 2009. Patient demographic characteristics, airway assessments, type of anesthesia, quality of ventilation, and perioperative complications were recorded.ResultsOf the 43 patients included, 8 (18.6%) had at least 1 difficult airway criterion. We were able to insert the Proseal laryngeal mask in all patients. Ventilation was optimal in 39 (91%) patients, with maintenance of end-expiratory carbon dioxide pressures between 35 and 40 mm Hg and airway pressures above 25 cm H2O throughout the procedures. Air leaks developed in 3 cases (7%) when the patient was placed in a lateral-cervical position for surgery; these patients required orotracheal intubation before surgery could begin. Mean duration of surgery was 53 minutes. Awakening occurred without incident in all cases.Conclusions The Proseal laryngeal mask is useful for airway management in patients undergoing ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Due to the forced position of the neck, however, it may be necessary to reposition the mask or even proceed to orotracheal intubation in some cases. As is the case for other advanced uses, experience with the device is necessary. Material for managing a difficult airway should be on hand.ResumenObjetivoTransmitir la experiencia con el uso de la mascarilla laríngea Proseal (MLP) en el manejo de la vía aérea de los pacientes sometidos a cirugía de derivación ventrículo peritoneal, en cuanto a su utilidad, eficacia y seguridad.Pacientes y métodosRevisamos retrospectivamente las historias de todos los pacientes sometidos a derivación ventrículo peritoneal y ventilados con MLP entre enero del 2006 y octubre del 2009. Registramos las características demográficas de los pacientes, valoración de la vía aérea, tipo de anestesia, calidad de ventilación y complicaciones perioperatorias.ResultadosSe incluyeron 43 pacientes, 8 (18,6%) cumplían algún criterio de vía aérea difícil (VAD). La inserción de la MLP fue posible en todos los pacientes. La ventilación fue óptima en 39 pacientes (91%), manteniendo valores entre 35–40 mmHg de CO2 telespiratorio y presiones de vía aérea por debajo de 25 cmH2O durante todo el procedimiento. Tres pacientes (7%) presentaron fugas en la vía aérea al ser colocados en la posición quirúrgica cervical lateral forzada y precisaron intubación orotraqueal para iniciar la cirugía. El tiempo quirúrgico promedio fue de 53 minutos. La educción ocurrió sin incidentes en todos los casos.ConclusionesLa MLP es útil en el manejo de la vía aérea de los pacientes intervenidos de derivación ventriculoperitoneal, aunque debido a la posición forzada del cuello, puede ser necesario ajustar la colocación de la mascarilla, y en algunos casos la intubación orotraqueal. Como en otros usos avanzados se requiere experiencia en su uso y tener disponible el material de VAD.
    Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion 01/2011; 58(6):362–364.
  • Resuscitation 12/2010; 81(2). · 3.96 Impact Factor
  • Resuscitation 12/2010; 81(2). · 3.96 Impact Factor
  • Resuscitation 12/2010; 81(2). · 3.96 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2010; 27. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2010; 27. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2010; 27:236-237. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe monitoring, anesthetic management, and risk factors for complications in neuroendoscopic surgery. Patients who underwent neuroendoscopy between 1994 and 2003 under general anesthesia, with monitoring of intracranial pressure from inside the neuroendoscope, were studied retrospectively. In some patients, the blood flow rate in the middle cerebral artery was monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Information was collected related to surgical procedure and the development of complications. Of 101 patients included in the study, transcranial Doppler ultrasound images were available for 20. In 75 patients neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure exceeded 20 mm Hg. Forty-five percent of the patients with available transcranial Doppler ultrasound images showed episodes of reduced diastolic flow rate in the middle cerebral artery during ventricular irrigation. Hemodynamic instability was associated with higher neuroendoscopic intracranial pressures (P < .05). An increase of more than 30 mm Hg in neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure was associated with more postoperative complications, the most common of which was delayed awakening. Procedures that were more complicated than a simple ventriculostomy were performed in 58% of the cases. Mean (SD) neuroendoscopic intracranial pressures in such cases were higher (50.5 [30.9] mm Hg vs 31.8 [25.1 mm Hg] in the simpler procedures) and the postoperative complication rate was higher (P = .003). Neuroendoscopic surgery can causes increases in neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure that are associated with disturbances in cerebral blood flow and complications. This situation demonstrates the importance of monitoring intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow.
    Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion 03/2009; 56(2):75-82.
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2008; 25:22-23. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is little available information regarding contamination of perineural catheters. Incidence ranges from 5% to 57%, depending on the location of the catheter. The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the incidence and predisposing factors of bacterial contamination of these catheters. The study included 47 patients who had an epidural (24 patients) or perineural (23 patients) catheter inserted for a minimum of 48 hours. We recorded details of the patients' characteristics, difficulty of insertion and duration of placement of the catheter, antibiotic treatment received, and signs of local or systemic infection immediately after surgery. When the catheters were removed, cultures were prepared using the Maki method. A descriptive analysis was performed and the frequency of contamination was determined using various parameters. The incidence of contamination was 28% (13 patients): 5/24 (21%) in epidural catheters, 6/17 (35%) in femoral catheters, and 2/6 (33%) in brachial and sciatic plexus catheters. Colonization was not influenced by the patients' characteristics, technical difficulties in placing the catheter, prophylactic antibiotic treatment, or the characteristics of the infusion administered. None of the patients presented clinical signs of infection. The most commonly isolated microorganism was Staphylococcus epidermidis, found in 10 patients (69% of the colonized catheters). Although infection of perineural catheters is exceptional when they are placed for 2 or more days, contamination is very common. Epidemiological studies are required to evaluate the variables involved.
    Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion 12/2007; 54(9):537-42.
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2007; 24. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2006; 23. · 3.01 Impact Factor
  • European Journal of Anaesthesiology 01/2006; 23. · 3.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Intermittent high peak pressure values inside the endoscope during neuroendoscopic surgical procedures are associated with postoperative morbidity. Unexpected delay in awakening is the complication most frequently observed by the anesthesiologist as a result of high peak pressure values inside the endoscope. During eight neuroendoscopic procedures the authors continuously monitored cerebral hemodynamic function, using a transcranial doppler (TCD) probe fixed on patients' temporal window. We observed that episodes of high peak pressure values inside the endoscope during neuroendoscopic navigation rinsing periods resulted in changes in the TCD wave profile consistent with "near intracranial circulatory arrestlike" wave. No systemic hemodynamic warning signs accompanied these intermittent episodes of severe decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure. When the rinsing liquid was allowed to escape, the pressure inside the endoscope decreased and the TCD wave immediately returned to its previous value. Neuroendoscopic procedures, although classified as minimally invasive surgery, warrant special monitoring that could alert us to a decrease in cerebral perfusion pressure. Middle cerebral artery TCD recording is a reliable and accurate tool for this purpose.
    Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology 05/2001; 13(2):152-7. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of this study was to describe monitoring, anesthetic management, and risk factors for complications in neuroendoscopic surgery. Patients and Methods Patients who underwent neuroendoscopy between 1994 and 2003 under general anesthesia, with monitoring of intracranial pressure from inside the neuroendoscope, were studied retrospectively. In some patients, the blood flow rate in the middle cerebral artery was monitored using transcranial Doppler ultrasound. Information was collected related to surgical procedure and the development of complications. Results Of 101 patients included in the study, transcranial Doppler ultrasound images were available for 20. In 75 patients neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure exceeded 20 mm Hg. Forty-five percent of the patients with available transcranial Doppler ultrasound images showed episodes of reduced diastolic flow rate in the middle cerebral artery during ventricular irrigation. Hemodynamic instability was associated with higher neuroendoscopic intracranial pressures (P < .05). An increase of more than 30 mm Hg in neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure was associated with more postoperative complications, the most common of which was delayed awakening. Procedures that were more complicated than a simple ventriculostomy were performed in 58% of the cases. Mean (SD) neuroendoscopic intracranial pressures in such cases were higher (50.5 [30.9] mm Hg vs 31.8 [25.1 mm Hg] in the simpler procedures) and the postoperative complication rate was higher (P=.003). Conclusions Neuroendoscopic surgery can causes increases in neuroendoscopic intracranial pressure that are associated with disturbances in cerebral blood flow and complications. This situation demonstrates the importance of monitoring intracranial pressure and cerebral blood flow.
    Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion 56(2):75–82.
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the use, utility, safety, and effectiveness of the Proseal laryngeal mask for airway management in patients undergoing ventriculoperitonea shunting. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients in whom the Proseal laryngeal mask was used during ventriculoperitoneal shunting between January 2006 and October 2009. Patient demographic characteristics, airway assessments, type of anesthesia, quality of ventilation, and perioperative complications were recorded. Of the 43 patients included, 8 (18.6%) had at least 1 difficult airway criterion. We were able to insert the Proseal laryngeal mask in all patients. Ventilation was optimal in 39 (91%) patients, with maintenance of end-expiratory carbon dioxide pressures between 35 and 40 mm Hg and airway pressures above 25 cm H2O throughout the procedures. Air leaks developed in 3 cases (7%) when the patient was placed in a lateral-cervical position for surgery; these patients required orotracheal intubation before surgery could begin. Mean duration of surgery was 53 minutes. Awakening occurred without incident in all cases. The Proseal laryngeal mask is useful for airway management in patients undergoing ventriculoperitoneal shunting. Due to the forced position of the neck, however, it may be necessary to reposition the mask or even proceed to orotracheal intubation in some cases. As is the case for other advanced uses, experience with the device is necessary. Material for managing a difficult airway should be on hand.
    Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion 58(6):362-4.