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Publications (3)6.69 Total impact

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    Steven R Lamb, Marius Rademaker
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    ABSTRACT: Atopic dermatitis is an increasingly prevalent common childhood disease. While the majority of patients have mild disease, atopic dermatitis can cause considerable distress to patients and their caregivers, with significant social and financial cost to families. With a prevalence of 15 - 20% in Western countries, atopic dermatitis also has a considerable health and societal cost to the community. Many new treatments have been shown to be therapeutically effective, particularly in severe disease, including cyclosporin A (Neoral, Novartis AG), interferon, tacrolimus (Fujisawa Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd.) and iv. immunoglobulin. These are expensive when compared to standard treatments like emollients and topical corticosteroids and have significant adverse effects that limit their use. Additional costs related to monitoring are incurred and the long-term safety of these treatments is yet to be determined. However, an advantage over more traditional therapies is their ability to produce benefits even after treatment ceases. Treatments that produce long-term remissions have a greater likelihood of being cost-effective. With monetary constraints on healthcare and the importance governments place on reducing drug costs, economic evaluations are becoming an increasingly important factor for drug acceptance. Those evaluating cost-effectiveness should pay particular attention to the potential reduction in indirect and intangible costs. Unfortunately, there is a dearth of cost-effectiveness studies in atopic eczema and this needs to be addressed with some urgency.
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 04/2002; 3(3):249-55. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    S R Lamb, M Rademaker
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    ABSTRACT: Between 1994 and 2000, 63 isolates of Trichophyton violaceum and five isolates of Trichophyton soudanense were recorded in both private and public laboratories in Hamilton, New Zealand. A retrospective analysis of medical records of these patients was performed. From these 68 isolates, 58 were recovered from scalp specimens and 10 were recovered from other body sites. There were 51 patients with tinea capitis and nine patients in the tinea corporis group. Six patients had more than one isolate reported at different laboratories. As expected, the vast majority of scalp infections (46/51 patients) were children, with an overall median age of 6 years (range 8 months to 66 years). All patients in the tinea capitis group, except one, were refugee immigrants from East Africa. Of nine patients in the tinea corporis group, six were refugees from the same area. For tinea capitis, 31 patients received systemic antifungal therapy for at least 4 weeks, with either terbinafine (21 patients), griseofulvin (four patients) or itraconazole (six patients). Five patients received topical antifungal creams or shampoo as monotherapy only. The remainder (15 patients) received either no therapy or no record was available. The emergence of these two pathogens as causes of tinea capitis in Hamilton closely correlates with the increasing number of refugees from endemic areas. There is a high rate of person-to-person transmission with these anthropophilic organisms in children as well as adults in the family. Transmission of infection to the local population has been observed, but there is no evidence to date to suggest that these organisms have become endemic in the local population.
    Australasian Journal of Dermatology 12/2001; 42(4):260-3. · 0.97 Impact Factor
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    S R Lamb, M Rademaker
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    ABSTRACT: Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is standard therapy for primary immunodeficiencies, Kawasaki Disease and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. More recently, the use of high dose IVIg (2 g/kg in divided doses) has widened to include a number of inflammatory diseases, including atopic eczema. The mechanism of IVIg's anti-inflammatory action has yet to be fully understood. Proposed mechanisms include modulation of IgE responses and a reduction in inflammatory cytokines with a reduction in T-cell proliferation. Antibacterial and antitoxin effects may also play a role.
    Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy 02/2001; 2(1):67-74. · 2.86 Impact Factor