Kent R Thielen

Mayo Clinic - Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota, United States

Are you Kent R Thielen?

Claim your profile

Publications (29)87.37 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of this study was to determine 1) if repeat lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) resulted in recovery of pain relief, which has waned since an index injection, and 2) if cumulative benefit could be achieved by repeat injections within 3 months of the index injection.DesignRetrospective observational study with statistical modeling of the response to repeat TFESI.SettingAcademic radiology practice.PatientsTwo thousand eighty-seven single-level TFESIs were performed for radicular pain on 933 subjects. Subjects received repeat TFESIs >2 weeks and <1 year from the index injection.Methods Hierarchical linear modeling was performed to evaluate changes in continuous and categorical pain relief outcomes after repeat TFESI. Subgroup analyses were performed on patients with <3 months duration of pain (acute pain), patients receiving repeat injections within 3 months (clustered injections), and in patients with both acute pain and clustered injections.ResultsRepeat TFESIs achieved pain relief in both continuous and categorical outcomes. Relative to the index injection, there was a minimal but statistically significant decrease in pain relief in modeled continuous outcome measures with subsequent injections. Acute pain patients recovered all prior benefit with a statistically significant cumulative benefit. Patients receiving clustered injections achieved statistically significant cumulative benefit, of greater magnitude in acute pain patients.Conclusion Repeat TFESI may be performed for recurrence of radicular pain with the expectation of recovery of most or all previously achieved benefit; acute pain patients will likely recover all prior benefit. Repeat TFESIs within 3 months of the index injection can provide cumulative benefit.
    Pain Medicine 08/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess whether the immediate anesthetic response of pain relief (sensory blockade) or weakness (motor blockade) after lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is associated with longer term effectiveness in pain relief and functional recovery. Retrospective observational study. Single academic radiology practice. Three thousand six hundred forty-five lumbar TFESIs performed on 2,634 subjects. Subjects completed a pain numerical rating scale (NRS, 0-10) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (R-M) prior to and immediately after TFESI (NRS) and at 2 weeks and 2 months follow-up. Successful pain relief was ≥50% NRS reduction; functional success was ≥40% R-M reduction. Post-procedure motor weakness was recorded. Logistic regression models assessed association of immediate post-procedure NRS response, and NRS or R-M response at 2 weeks, with successful outcomes at 2 months. C-index assessed model discrimination; values closer to 1.0 indicated better discrimination. Immediate NRS response was weakly associated with 2-month outcomes (C-index = 0.58). NRS and R-M responses at 2 weeks were more strongly associated with the 2-month response (C-indices 0.77, 0.80, respectively). Post-procedure motor blockade had little association with successful 2-month NRS or R-M outcomes (C-indices 0.51, 0.50, respectively). Patients that responded at 2 weeks were more likely to be responders at 2 months than those who were non-responders at 2 weeks (odds ratio = 6.49, confidence interval 5.38, 7.84). Immediate post-TFESI pain relief does not strongly predict longer term effectiveness in pain relief or functional recovery. Response in pain relief or functional recovery at 2 weeks is more strongly associated with 2-month outcomes.
    Pain Medicine 01/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess whether computed tomography(CT)-guided injections of local anesthetic and corticosteroid into chronic lumbar pars interarticularis defects may identify and provide benefit to a cohort of patients where the pars defects act as a primary axial pain generator. Retrospective practice audit. Single academic radiology pain management practice. 59 consecutive patients undergoing CT-guided injections of lumbar pars defects. Patients were assessed with a pain numerical rating scale (NRS, 0-10) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (R-M) prior to injection and at 2 weeks and 2 months follow-up. For categorical outcomes, successful pain relief response was defined as either ≥50% reduction in NRS or pain 0/10; functional response was defined as ≥40% reduction in R-M score. Continuous outcomes (mean NRS, R-M scores) were assessed for significant change following injection. For categorical outcomes, 37.9% of patients were responders at 2 months' follow-up; 20.7 % had complete relief of index pain. For functional recovery, 34.5% were responders at 2 months. Using continuous outcomes, mean NRS was 5.4 ± 2.1 prior to injection and 3.6 ± 2.6 at 2 months (P < 0.0001). Mean R-M score was 11.7 ± 6.0 prior to injection and 9.0 ± 5.4 at 2 months (P = 0.001). There were no complications. This practice audit suggests that in patients with axial low back pain and chronic pars defects, the pars defects may be implicated as the primary axial pain generator in a small subgroup of patients. Local deposition of corticosteroids into the pars defect may provide significant pain relief in one out of three patients, and complete relief in one out of five patients. This data suggest there may be benefit to pursuing randomized controlled trials of pars injections comparing steroid injection with placebo.
    Pain Medicine 01/2014; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have described the safety and efficacy of computed tomography (CT)-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections with both the anterolateral and posterior approach. Although fluoroscopy is the most common form of image guidance for these procedures, CT guidance offers many advantages. However, some key features of CT guidance in these procedures need to be considered to ensure safe and technically successful outcomes.
    Journal of Neuroradiology 09/2013; · 1.24 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:The clinical impact of facet joint bone scan activity is not fully understood. The hypothesis of this study is that facet joints targeted for percutaneous treatment in clinical practice differ from those with reported activity on technetium Tc99m methylene diphosphonate SPECT/CT.MATERIALS AND METHODS:All patients with a technetium Tc99m methylene diphosphonate SPECT/CT scan of the lumbar or cervical spine who underwent subsequent percutaneous facet joint steroid injection or comparative medial branch blocks at our institution between January 1, 2008, and February 19, 2013, were identified. Facet joints with increased activity were compared with those treated. A chart review characterized the clinical reasons for treatment discrepancies.RESULTS:Of 74 patients meeting inclusion criteria, 52 (70%) had discrepant imaging findings and treatment selection of at least 1 facet joint, whereas 34 patients (46%) had a side (right vs left) discrepancy. Only 92 (70%) of 132 facet joints with increased activity were treated, whereas 103 (53%) of 195 of treated facet joints did not have increased activity. The most commonly documented clinical rationale for discrepancy was facet joint activity that was not thought to correlate with clinical findings, cited in 18 (35%) of 52 patients.CONCLUSIONS:Facet joints undergoing targeted percutaneous treatment were frequently discordant with those demonstrating increased technetium Tc99m methylene diphosphonate activity identified by SPECT/CT at our institution, in many cases because the active facet joint(s) did not correlate with clinical findings. Further prospective double-blinded investigations of the clinical significance of facet joint activity by use of technetium Tc99m methylene diphosphonate SPECT/CT and comparative medial branch blocks are needed.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 09/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess whether a nonparticulate steroid (dexamethasone, 10 mg) is less clinically effective than the particulate steroids (triamcinolone, 80 mg; betamethasone, 12 mg) in lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) in subjects with radicular pain with or without radiculopathy. Retrospective observational study with noninferiority analysis of dexamethasone relative to particulate steroids. Single academic radiology pain management practice. Three thousand six hundred forty-five lumbar TFESIs at the L4-5, L5-S1, or S1 neural foramina, performed on 2,634 subjects. Subjects were assessed with a pain numerical rating scale (NRS, 0-10) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (R-M) prior to TFESI, and at 2 weeks and 2 months follow-up. For categorical outcomes, successful pain relief was defined as either ≥50% reduction in NRS or pain 0/10; functional success was defined as ≥40% reduction in R-M score. Noninferiority analysis was performed with δ = -10% as the limit of noninferiority. Continuous outcomes (mean NRS, R-M scores) were analyzed for noninferiority with difference bounds of 0.3 for NRS scores and 1.0 for R-M scores. With categorical outcomes, dexamethasone was demonstrated to be noninferior to the particulate steroids in pain relief and functional improvement at 2 months. Using continuous outcomes, dexamethasone was demonstrated to be superior to the particulate steroids in both pain relief and functional improvement at 2 months. This retrospective observational study reveals no evidence that dexamethasone is less effective than particulate steroids in lumbar TFESIs performed for radicular pain with or without radiculopathy.
    Pain Medicine 07/2013; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the clinical effectiveness of single lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) in subjects with radicular pain with or without radiculopathy. Retrospective observational series. Single academic radiology pain management practice. Two thousand twenty-four subjects undergoing single lumbar TFESIs at the L4-5, L5-S1, or S1 neural foramina. Subjects were assessed with a pain numerical rating scale (NRS, 0-10) and Roland-Morris disability questionnaire (R-M, 23-point Deyo modification) prior to TFESI and at 2 weeks and 2 months follow-up. Successful pain relief (responders) was defined as either ≥50% reduction in NRS or pain 0/10; functional success was defined as ≥40% reduction in R-M score. There were statistically significant (P < 0.0001) reductions in mean NRS and R-M scores at 2 weeks and 2 months postinjection. For NRS, 40.9% were responders at 2 weeks and 45.6% at 2 months. For R-M, 31.9% were responders at 2 weeks and 41.3% at 2 months. The proportion of responders for NRS and R-M was higher when there was <3 months of pain (odds ratio 2-month NRS = 2.42 [95% confidence interval: 1.82, 3.24], odds ratio 2-month R-M = 2.61 [1.96, 3.48]). For subjects with <3 months of pain, the proportion of responders was 62.4% (56.5, 68.3%) for NRS and 59.3% (53.3, 65.3%) for R-M scores. This retrospective observational study suggests TFESIs are clinically effective in the treatment of lumbar radicular pain. Subjects with a shorter duration of pain are more likely to achieve a successful outcome.
    Pain Medicine 04/2013; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess frequency of sedation in transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESI) and to analyze patient dissatisfaction and vasovagal rates. DESIGN: Retrospective audit over a 6-year period, January 1, 2006-December 31, 2011. SETTING: Single academic center radiology pain management practice. SUBJECTS: Four thousand four hundred thirty-two patients undergoing 6,878 consecutive TFESI. OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency of sedation for TFESI was assessed. Vasovagal and patient dissatisfaction rates were assessed, the latter by patients' responses to two follow-up survey questions at 2 weeks postprocedure. RESULTS: Six thousand eight hundred seventy-eight TFESI were performed, of which only 0.1% (N = 7) were performed with sedation. Only 0.4% (N = 28) of TFESI were complicated by vasovagal reaction. Seventy-two percent (N = 4,980) of nonsedated patients responded to the survey. Overall medical care in the nonsedated was rated as: excellent 51%, very good 30%, good 15%, fair 3%, and poor 1%. Ninety-five percent confidence interval (CI) for the 3.9% of the nonsedated patients who rated their care at best "fair" was (3.3, 4.4%). Likelihood of referring friends/family members in nonsedated patients was: definitely 53%, probably 28%, uncertain 16%, probably not 3%, definitely not 0.2%. Ninety-five percent CI for the 3.2% of the nonsedated patients who would at best "probably not refer" their friends/family was (2.7, 3.7%). CONCLUSIONS: In our radiology pain management practice, sedation was rarely utilized for TFESI. A small minority of nonsedated patients rated their care at best fair and would at best probably not refer friends/family members. TFESI can be performed without sedation with low patient dissatisfaction and low vasovagal rates.
    Pain Medicine 04/2013; · 2.46 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:The prevalence of facet joint signal change in acute/subacute lumbar vertebral body compression fractures is unknown. We hypothesized that facet joint signal change on MR imaging is more common in facet joints associated with an acute/subacute lumbar compression fracture than those associated with normal vertebral bodies or ones that have a chronic compression fracture.MATERIALS AND METHODS:Three neuroradiologists and a neuroradiology fellow retrospectively graded facet joint inflammatory change on MR imaging in 900 facet joints in 75 patients with at least 1 painful osteoporotic lumbar compression fracture. Facet joint signal change was assessed on T2-weighted images with chemical fat-saturation, STIR images, and/or gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images with chemical fat-saturation. Each facet joint from the T12/L1 to L5/S1 level was assessed individually. An overall facet joint signal-change score, which is a composite measure of the grade of signal change for all 4 facet joints associated with a given lumbar vertebral level, was devised, and statistical significance was assessed via Wilcoxon rank sum tests.RESULTS:The overall facet joint signal-change scores were significantly higher at vertebral body levels affected by an acute/subacute compression fracture compared with control levels, which were associated with either normal bodies or chronic compression fractures.CONCLUSIONS:Our findings suggest an association between facet joint signal change on MR imaging and acute/subacute lumbar vertebral body compression fractures.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 02/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:Imaging-guided cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections have been shown to decrease verbal numerical pain scores and improve functionality (Roland Morris Disability Index). These injections are often administered in combination with local anesthetic. The purpose of this study was to determine if the immediate postprocedure VNPS predicts the long-term effectiveness of the injection.MATERIALS AND METHODS:A quality assurance data base review of 247 patient records was used to document the VNPS and RMDI of patients undergoing a single CT-guided CTESI. Pain scores were recorded before the procedure, immediately after the procedure, at 2 weeks, and at 2 months. The RMDI was recorded before the procedure, at 2 weeks, and at 2 months. Spearman rank correlation analysis and logistic regression models were used to determine if the immediate postprocedure or 2-week VNPS correlated with or predicted the longer-term VNPS and RMDI as measured at 2 weeks and 2 months.RESULTS:There was not a strong correlation between the pain score obtained immediately after the procedure and the 2-month outcome of the VNPS or RMDI. The pain scores at 2 weeks did correlate with the 2-month outcomes. The 2-week VNPS also was a significant predictor of patients who would achieve a >50% improvement in VNPS or RMDI at 2 months.CONCLUSIONS:Pain scores obtained immediately after completion of a single CT-guided CTESI do not predict the long-term effectiveness of this procedure. However, patient response at 2 weeks does correlate with the long-term effectiveness of these injections as measured by the VNPS and the RMDI.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 02/2013; · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Sacroplasty has emerged as a treatment option for patients with painful osteoporotic sacral insufficiency fractures. We report short-term outcomes in a consecutive cohort of patients treated with sacroplasty. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 57 patients treated with sacroplasty for painful osteoporotic sacral fractures at our institution between 2004 and 2011. An 11-point numerical rating scale pain score was recorded at rest and at activity pre- and post-procedure. Opioids prescribed to the patient both pre- and post-procedure were recorded. RESULTS: Mean duration of pain prior to sacroplasty was 3 weeks (IQR 2-5). Procedural complications were minimal. Median post-procedure follow-up time was 2.5 weeks (IQR 1-5) among 45 patients with available data. Thirty-seven (82%) of the 45 patients experienced a numerical or descriptive decrease from initial pain at follow-up. Median activity pain scores collected from 13 patients decreased from 10 (IQR 8.5-10) pre-procedure to 6 (IQR 4-6.8) post-procedure (p<0.0001), and median rest pain scores collected from 29 patients decreased from 7 (IQR 4-8.5) to 2 (IQR 1-3.5)(p<0.0001). Twenty-two (76%) of 29 patients had at least a 30% decrease in rest pain scores. The median number of opioids prescribed per patient decreased from 1 (IQR 1-2) pre-procedure to 0 (IQR 0-1) post-procedure (p<0.0001). Thirty-four of 57 patients (60%) had decreased opioid usage, 15 (26%) patients had unchanged usage and 8 (14%) had increased usage. CONCLUSIONS: Our series demonstrates that sacroplasty is a safe and effective treatment in patients with painful osteoporotic insufficiency fractures.
    Journal of neurointerventional surgery 01/2013; · 1.38 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of our study was to review the clinical utility of digital subtraction myelography for the diagnosis of spinal CSF leaks in patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) and those with superficial siderosis. Procedure logs from 2007 to 2011 were reviewed to identify cases in which digital subtraction myelography was performed to diagnose spinal CSF leaks. Electronic medical records were reviewed to obtain information regarding diagnosis and outcome. For patients to be included in the study, preprocedural spinal MRI had to show an extradural fluid collection spanning more than one vertebral level and postmyelographic CT had to confirm the presence of an active CSF leak. If digital subtraction myelography successfully showed the site of the CSF leak, the location was documented. Eleven patients (seven men and four women; mean age, 49.0 years) underwent digital subtraction myelography during the study period. Six patients had SIH and five patients had superficial siderosis. The extradural fluid collection on spinal MRI averaged a length of 15.5 vertebral levels. Digital subtraction myelography successfully showed the site of the CSF leak in nine of the 11 patients, and all of the dural tears were located in the thoracic spine between T3 and T11. Digital subtraction myelography is a valuable diagnostic tool for the localization of rapid spinal CSF leaks and should be considered in patients who are clinically suspected to have a dural tear that is accompanied by a longitudinally extensive extradural fluid collection on spinal MRI.
    American Journal of Roentgenology 09/2012; 199(3):649-53. · 2.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Image-guided cervical transforaminal epidural injections play an important role in the management of cervical radicular pain syndromes. The safety and efficacy of these injections via an anterolateral approach has been well-studied. The goal of this retrospective review was to determine the safety and efficacy of CT-guided transforaminal epidural injections by using a posterior approach. Retrospective review of patient records was used to define VNPS and RMDI of patients undergoing CT-guided transforaminal cervical epidural injections between 2006 and 2010. Pain scores were recorded preprocedure, immediately postprocedure, at 2 weeks, and at 2 months. The RMDI was recorded preprocedure, at 2 weeks, and at 2 months. Data analysis of 247 patients was completed. Differences in VNPS scores and the RMDI were then compared on the basis of a CT-guided approach (anterolateral versus posterior). There was no statistical difference in the degree of pain relief and improvement in the RMDI between the CT-guided transforaminal anterolateral approach and the posterior approach at 2 weeks and at 2 months. Both groups demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in pain scores and the RMDI. Approximately 35% of patients in both groups demonstrated >50% pain relief at 2 months. There were no serious complications in either group. CT-guided transforaminal cervical epidural injections by using a posterior approach are safe and effective.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 12/2011; 33(3):415-9. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Precise anatomic understanding of the vascular anatomy of SDAVFs is required before treatment. This study demonstrates the utility of C-arm conebeam CT to locate precisely the fistulous point in SDAVFs and the courses of their feeding arteries and draining veins. This retrospective study reports 14 consecutive patients with SDAVFs who underwent DSA and C-arm conebeam CT angiography. SDAVF sites included 5 thoracic, 7 lumbar, and 2 sacral fistulas. Selective DSA initially identified the location and arterial supply of the SDAVF. C-arm conebeam CT angiography was then performed with selective injection into the feeding artery. Reconstructed images were reviewed at a workstation with the referring surgeon, in conjunction with the standard 2D DSA images. The value of C-arm conebeam CT in depicting the fistula and the relationship to adjacent structures was qualitatively assessed. In all 14 patients, C-arm conebeam CT angiography was technically successful and precisely demonstrated the site of the fistula, feeding arteries, draining veins, and the relationship of the fistula to adjacent osseous structures. Information obtained from the C-arm conebeam CT angiogram was considered useful in all surgically (12 patients) and endovascularly (2 patients) treated SDAVFs. 3D C-arm conebeam CT angiography is a useful adjunct to 2D DSA in the anatomic characterization of SDAVFs. The technique allowed improved visualization of the vascular anatomy of the SDAVFs and clearer definition of their spatial relationships to adjacent structures.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 10/2009; 31(3):476-80. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To determine if operator variability, prior vertebroplasty experience, or acquired vertebroplasty experience affects clinical outcomes. Informed consent was obtained from all patients and all data were handled in a manner consistent with institutional review board guidelines and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. Outcomes from 841 vertebroplasties, sorted by operator, were studied; two operators had previous vertebroplasty experience and five were neurointerventionalists who were initially new to the procedure. Objective (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RDQ] and analog pain scales) and subjective (mobility, narcotic use) scores were monitored before and after vertebroplasty at specified intervals following treatment. Perioperative cement volume utilization, complications, and number of treated levels were recorded. Random-effects and repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to assess operator differences and variability in clinical outcomes while generalized linear mixed-model regression analyses were used to track changes in clinical outcomes over time. All operators provided similar average durable clinical improvements in postoperative pain and disability with nonsignificant interoperator variability. However, generalized linear model regression suggests that four of five initially novice operators showed significant changes in several procedural measures and clinical outcomes over the study timeframe, including cement volume utilization (reduction of 3.64 to 4.63 cm(3)), 1 week RDQ score (reduction of 4.79 to 8.62 points) and postoperative rest pain (reduction of 1.18 to 2.03 points). Changes over time in measured outcomes suggest the presence of a training effect among novice operators. Cement volume utilization and immediate postprocedural pain decrease with experience but long-term clinical outcomes are insensitive to operator experience.
    Radiology 08/2009; 253(2):478-85. · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • J Bradley White, Kent R Thielen, David F Kallmes
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Technical report. To convey the mechanism of venous air embolism (VAE) during percutaneous spinal procedures and its proper identification and management. Percutaneous spinal procedures such as vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty are commonplace techniques employed to alleviate back pain for compression fractures. VAE is a real and likely underappreciated phenomenon that is important to recognize. A case report is used to illustrate the clinical scenario of VAE during vertebroplasty performed for a T9 compression fracture. The rapid sumping of fluid and air was identified during the procedure and believed to be due to a large air/venous interface within the trabecular bone. The needle was capped and no undue harm occurred to the patient. VAE is a complication with associated morbidity and mortality from percutaneous procedures for the treatment of compression fractures. An understanding of the causes, prevention, identification, and management when it occurs will serve to improve patient care and reduce morbidity.
    Spine 07/2009; 34(14):1526-8. · 2.16 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present report describes the use of a curved, coaxial infusion cannula that can be applied to facilitate targeted multifocal vertebral body cement injection during vertebroplasty from a single access site. Two representative cases are presented that illustrate the ability of targeted cement deposition and flexible site selection with this technique.
    Journal of vascular and interventional radiology: JVIR 03/2009; 20(4):553-5. · 1.81 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vertebroplasty has been commonly used for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures. Practitioners usually attempt to maximize filling of the vertebral body with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), either by using a bipediculate approach with separate infusions in both hemivertebrae or by using a unipediculate approach with central needle placement that allows bilateral hemivertebral filling. This study serves to investigate the clinical efficacy of a unipediculate approach in which the cement injected does not cross the midline, with resultant "hemivertebroplasty." A retrospective review of 917 vertebroplasty procedures was performed. A radiologic review of each vertebroplasty in the data base was performed to extract the vertebroplasties in which there was filling of only 1 side of the hemivertebra, which we term "hemivertebroplasty." Pre- and postoperative evaluations (1-week to 2-year postprocedure) included a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) scores, and information regarding new fractures and retreatment of augmented fractures. No significant difference was found between the hemivertebroplasty cases and the bilaterally filled vertebroplasty group in reducing VAS or RDQ scores. Moreover, survival analysis showed no significant difference in the risk of incident fracture between groups (hazard ratio = 0.81; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-2.65). On the basis of our results, unilateral "hemivertebroplasty" is as effective in reducing pain with activity and at rest and decreasing the RDQ scores as bilateral vertebral filling. Additionally, vertebrae undergoing unilateral filling were at no greater risk of refracture or fracture of adjacent vertebrae than bilaterally filled vertebrae.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 02/2009; 30(3):496-9. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • Source
    E M Knavel, K R Thielen, D F Kallmes
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Vertebroplasty is commonly used for osteoporotic and neoplastic compression fractures, yet little evidence exists for its use in traumatic nonosteoporotic compression fractures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of percutaneous vertebroplasty for patients with traumatic nonosteoporotic compression fractures. We performed a retrospective review of 819 patients (982 procedures) who underwent percutaneous vertebroplasty, to identify patients who had normal bone mineral densitometry scores or had no previous diagnosis of osteoporosis, multiple myeloma, or history of long-term steroid use. Follow-up evaluations included pain at rest and with activity (assessed with the visual analog scale [VAS]), medication use, and mobility. Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) scores were also collected. Statistical analysis included a 2-tailed t test comparing postprocedure outcomes with baseline values. Fifteen patients (53% women) were included. Mean age and t-score were 60 years and -0.35, respectively. We found significant improvements in the VAS scores, both at rest and with activity, and in the RDQ scores, starting at the 2-hour follow-up. Additionally, we found marked decreases in medication use and improvements in mobility. The complication rate was low and characterized by asymptomatic extravasation of cement. From our study, we have shown that vertebroplasty can be successfully and safely used in patients with traumatic nonosteoporotic compression fractures. Vertebroplasty in these patients should be used after failure of conservative treatments and may be used in place of more invasive spinal reconstruction techniques.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 12/2008; 30(2):323-7. · 3.17 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Despite the literature supporting the efficacy of vertebroplasty for treatment of osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures, few reports exist documenting its use in the treatment of compression fractures in multiple myeloma patients. Accordingly, we sought to characterize the imaging characteristics, clinical course, and outcomes in myeloma patients treated with vertebroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of clinical outcome data from 67 multiple myeloma patients treated with vertebroplasty since October 2000. Quantitative outcome data including the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and Visual Analog Scales for pain and qualitative outcome data (self-reported pain, mobility, and narcotic use) were collected preoperatively, immediately after vertebroplasty, and at 1 week, 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year after treatment. Significant improvements in all of the outcome measures were observed postoperatively and throughout the duration of follow-up. Quantitative outcome measures (RDQ, analog pain scale 0-10, with rest and activity) improved by 11.0 (48%; P < .0001), 2.7 (25%; P < .001), and 5.3 (48%; P < .0001) points, respectively, with persistent improvement at 1 year (P < .01; P < .03; P < .001). Eighty-two percent and 89% of patients experienced a significant improvement in subjective rest pain and activity pain, respectively. Subjective scores achieved durable improvements, with 65% of patients requiring fewer narcotics after vertebroplasty and 70% having improved mobility. Vertebroplasty provides significant and durable pain relief for patients with intractable spinal pain secondary to compression fractures resulting from multiple myeloma.
    American Journal of Neuroradiology 04/2008; 29(4):642-8. · 3.17 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

411 Citations
87.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • Mayo Clinic - Rochester
      • Department of Radiology
      Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • 2013
    • American University of Beirut
      Beyrouth, Beyrouth, Lebanon
  • 2007–2013
    • Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research
      • Department of Radiology
      Rochester, MI, United States
  • 2009
    • Texas A&M University
      College Station, Texas, United States
    • University of Wisconsin–Madison
      Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • 2006
    • Baylor Health Care System
      Dallas, Texas, United States