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Publications (3)20.76 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology. Recent studies have shown evidence demonstrating that mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant. Low CoQ10 levels have been detected in patients with FM, and a significant decrease of clinical symptoms has been reported after oral CoQ10 supplementation. In this report, we show the effect of CoQ10 treatment on clinical symptoms, blood mononuclear cells, and mitochondrial and oxidative stress markers from a woman with FM. After CoQ10 treatment, the patient reported a significant improvement of clinical symptoms. At the cellular level, CoQ10 treatment restored mitochondrial dysfunction and the mtDNA copy number, decreased oxidative stress, and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Our results suggest that CoQ10 could be an alternative therapeutic approach for FM.
    Nutrition 08/2012; 28(11-12):1200-3. · 2.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Memory formation requires changes in gene expression, which are regulated by the activation of transcription factors and by changes in epigenetic factors. Poly[ADP]-ribosylation of nuclear proteins has been postulated as a chromatin modification involved in memory consolidation, although the mechanisms involved are not well characterized. Here we demonstrate that poly[ADP]-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity and the poly[ADP]-ribosylation of proteins over a specific time course is required for the changes in synaptic plasticity related to memory stabilization in mice. At the molecular level, histone H1 poly[ADP]-ribosylation was evident in the hippocampus after the acquisition period, and it was selectively released in a PARP-1-dependent manner at the promoters of cAMP response element-binding protein and nuclear factor-κB dependent genes associated with learning and memory. These findings suggest that histone H1 poly[ADP]-ribosylation, and its loss at specific loci, is an epigenetic mechanism involved in the reprogramming of neuronal gene expression required for memory consolidation.
    Journal of Neuroscience 10/2010; 30(40):13305-13. · 6.91 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Memory deficits in aging affect millions of people and are often disturbing to those concerned. Dissection of the molecular control of learning and memory is paramount to understand and possibly enhance cognitive functions. Old-age memory loss also has been recently linked to altered Ca(2+) homeostasis. We have previously identified DREAM (downstream regulatory element antagonistic modulator), a member of the neuronal Ca(2+) sensor superfamily of EF-hand proteins, with specific roles in different cell compartments. In the nucleus, DREAM is a Ca(2+)-dependent transcriptional repressor, binding to specific DNA signatures, or interacting with nucleoproteins regulating their transcriptional properties. Also, we and others have shown that dream mutant (dream(-/-)) mice exhibit marked analgesia. Here we report that dream(-/-) mice exhibit markedly enhanced learning and synaptic plasticity related to improved cognition. Mechanistically, DREAM functions as a negative regulator of the key memory factor CREB in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and loss of DREAM facilitates CREB-dependent transcription during learning. Intriguingly, 18-month-old dream(-/-) mice display learning and memory capacities similar to young mice. Moreover, loss of DREAM protects from brain degeneration in aging. These data identify the Ca(2+)-regulated "pain gene" DREAM as a novel key regulator of memory and brain aging.
    Current biology: CB 08/2009; 19(1):54-60. · 10.99 Impact Factor