Maria G Tektonidou

National Technical University of Athens, Athínai, Attica, Greece

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Publications (63)319.16 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To report the 10-year follow-up of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial comparing azathioprine (AZA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as maintenance therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis, and to test different definitions of early response as predictors of long-term renal outcome. In 2014, data on survival, kidney function, 24 h proteinuria, renal flares and other outcomes were collected for the 105 patients randomised between 2002 and 2006, except in 13 lost to follow-up. Death (2 and 3 in the AZA and MMF groups, respectively) and end-stage renal disease (1 and 3, respectively) were rare events. Time to renal flare (22 and 19 flares in AZA and MMF groups, respectively) did not differ between AZA and MMF patients. Patients with good long-term renal outcome had a much more stringent early decrease of 24 h proteinuria compared with patients with poor outcome. The positive predictive value of a 24 h proteinuria <0.5 g/day at 3 months, 6 months and 12 months for a good long-term renal outcome was excellent (between 89% and 92%). Inclusion of renal function and urinalysis in the early response criteria did not impact the value of early proteinuria decrease as long-term prognostic marker. The long-term follow-up data of the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial do not indicate that MMF is superior to AZA as maintenance therapy in a Caucasian population suffering from proliferative lupus nephritis. Moreover, we confirm the excellent positive predictive value of an early proteinuria decrease for long-term renal outcome. NCT00204022. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. To compare rates of hospitalizations for serious infections, trends in rates from 1996 to 2011, and in-hospital mortality between patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and those without SLE in a national sample. Methods. We analyzed hospitalizations for pneumonia, bacteremia/sepsis, urinary tract infections, skin infections, and opportunistic infections among adults in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. We compared rates of hospitalizations yearly among patients with SLE and the general population. We also computed odds ratios for in-hospital mortality. Results. In 1996, the estimated number of hospitalizations for pneumonia in patients with SLE was 4382, followed by sepsis (2305), skin infections (1422), urinary tract infections (643), and opportunistic infections (370). Rates were much higher in SLE than those without SLE, with age-adjusted relative risks ranging from 5.7 (95% confidence interval (CI) 5.5, 6.0) for pneumonia to 9.8 (95% CI 9.1, 10.7) for urinary tract infection in 1996. Risks increased over time, so that by 2011, all relative risks exceeded 12.0. Overall risk of in-hospital mortality was higher in SLE only for opportunistic infections (adjusted odds ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.12, 2.07). However, in pneumonia and sepsis, mortality risks were higher in SLE among those that required mechanical ventilation. Conclusion. Hospitalization rates for serious infections in SLE increased substantially between 1996 and 2011, reaching over 12 times higher than in patients without SLE in 2011. Reasons for this acceleration are unclear. In-hospital mortality was higher among patients with SLE and opportunistic infections, and those with pneumonia or sepsis who required mechanical ventilation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2015 American College of Rheumatology.
    02/2015; DOI:10.1002/acr.22575
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this task force was to critically analyze nine non-criteria manifestations of APS to support their inclusion as APS classification criteria. The Task Force Members selected the non-criteria clinical manifestations according to their clinical relevance, that is, the patient-important outcome from clinician perspective. They included superficial vein thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, renal microangiopathy, heart valve disease, livedo reticularis, migraine, chorea, seizures and myelitis, which were reviewed by this International Task Force collaboration, in addition to the seronegative APS (SN-APS). GRADE system was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of medical literature of each selected item. This critical appraisal exercise aimed to support the debate regarding the clinical picture of APS. We found that the overall GRADE analysis was very low for migraine and seizures, low for superficial venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, chorea, longitudinal myelitis and the so-called seronegative APS and moderate for APS nephropathy, heart valve lesions and livedo reticularis. The next step can be a critical redefinition of an APS gold standard, for instance derived from the APS ACTION registry that will include not only current APS patients but also those with antiphospholipid antibodies not meeting current classification criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Autoimmunity Reviews 01/2015; 14(5). DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2015.01.002 · 7.10 Impact Factor
  • Clinical Infectious Diseases 11/2014; 60(6). DOI:10.1093/cid/ciu938 · 9.42 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With current advances in medical treatment, reproductive issues have become more important for women with chronic immune-mediated diseases. Most, if not all, patients report that their disease affects their personal relationships, their decision to have children, and the size of their family. These decisions are multi-factorial, influenced mainly by concerns over the effect of pregnancy on the rheumatic disease, the impact of disease activity during pregnancy on foetal health, the patient's ability to care for the child, and the possible harmful effects medication could have on the child, both pre- and post-natally during breastfeeding. Apart from that, women's health issues tend to be overlooked in favour of the management of the underlying rheumatic disease. To this end, we convened an expert panel to review the published literature on women's health and reproductive issues and provide evidence- and eminence-based points to consider for the treating physicians. We conclude that there is a need for a change in mind-set from one which 'cautions against pregnancy' to one which 'embraces pregnancy' through the practice of individualised, pre- and post-conceptual, multi-disciplinary care.
    Clinical and experimental rheumatology 11/2014; 32(6). · 2.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed an individual patient meta-analysis to determine whether aspirin has a significant protective effect on the risk of first thrombosis among patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). Five international cohort studies with available individual patient-level data, reporting on primary prophylaxis with continuous treatment with low-dose aspirin in patients with aPL were included. The main outcome was the occurrence of a first thrombotic in patients with aPL treated with low-dose aspirin compared to those not treated with low-dose aspirin. Pooled Hazard Ratios (HRs) and 95%CIs were calculated using frailty models. We pooled data from 497 subjects and 79 first thrombotic events (3469 patient-years of follow-up). After adjustment on cardiovascular risk factors, aPL profiles, and treatment with hydroxychloroquine, the HR for the risk of a first thrombosis of any type in aPL carriers treated with low-dose aspirin versus those not treated with aspirin was 0.43 (95%CI 0.25–0.75). Subgroup analysis showed a protective effect of aspirin against arterial (HR: 0.43 [95%CI: 0.20–0.93]) but not venous (HR: 0.49 [95%CI: 0.22–1.11]) thrombosis. Subgroup analysis according to underlying disease revealed a protective effect of aspirin against arterial thrombosis for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (HR: 0.43 [95%CI: 0.20–0.94]) and asymptomatic aPL carriers (HR: 0.43 [95%CI 0.20–0.93]). We found no independent protective effect of hydroxychloroquine. This individual patient data meta-analysis shows that the risk of first thrombotic event as well of first arterial thrombotic event is significantly decreased among SLE patients and asymptomatic aPL individuals treated by low-dose aspirin.
    Autoimmunity Reviews 10/2014; 14(3). DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2014.10.019 · 7.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) is characterized by vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy morbidity occurring in patients with persistent antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL). The primary objective of the APS Treatment Trends Task Force, created as part of the 14th International Congress on aPL, was to systematically review the potential future treatment strategies for aPL-positive patients. The task force chose as future clinical research directions: a) determining the necessity for venous thrombosis controlled clinical trials with the new oral direct thrombin or anti-Factor Xa inhibitors pending the results of ongoing rivaroxaban in APS (RAPS) trial, and designing controlled clinical trials in other forms of thrombotic APS; b) systematically analyzing the literature as well as aPL/APS registries, and creating specific registries for non warfarin/heparin anticoagulants; c) increasing recruitment for an ongoing primary thrombosis prevention trial, and designing secondary thrombosis and pregnancy morbidity prevention trials with hydroxychloroquine; d) determining surrogate markers to select patients for statin trials; e) designing controlled studies with rituximab and other anti B-cell agents; f) designing mechanistic and clinical studies with eculizumab and other complement inhibitors; and g) chemically modifying peptide therapy to improve the half-life and minimize immunogenicity. The report also includes recommendations for clinicians who consider using these agents in difficult-to-manage aPL-positive patients.
    Autoimmunity reviews 01/2014; DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2014.01.053 · 7.10 Impact Factor
  • Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 01/2014; 71(Suppl 3):242-242. DOI:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-eular.2225 · 9.27 Impact Factor
  • La Revue de Médecine Interne 12/2013; 34:A48-A49. DOI:10.1016/j.revmed.2013.10.067 · 1.32 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether aspirin has a significant protective effect on risk of first thrombosis among patients with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL+). Observational and interventional studies identified from the Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were selected if they assessed the incidence of first thrombosis in aPL+patients treated with aspirin versus those without. Pooled effect estimates were obtained using a random-effects model. Of 1211 citation retrieved, 11 primary studies (10 observational and 1 interventional) met inclusion criteria, including a total of 1208 patients and 139 thrombotic events. The pooled odds ratio (OR) for the risk of first thrombosis in patients treated with aspirin (n=601) was 0.50 (95%CI: 0.27 to 0.93) compared to those without aspirin (n=607), with significant heterogeneity across studies (I(2)=46%, p=0.05). Subgroup analysis showed a protective effect of aspirin against arterial (OR: 0.48 [95%CI: 0.28-0.82]) but not venous (OR: 0.58 [95% CI: 0.32-1.06]) thrombosis, as well as in retrospective (OR: 0.23 [0.13-0.42]) but not prospective studies (OR: 0.91 [0.52-1.59]). Subgroup analysis according to underlying disease revealed a significant protective effect of aspirin for asymptomatic aPL+individuals (OR: 0.50 [0.25-0.99]), for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) (OR: 0.55 [0.31-0.98]) and obstetrical antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) (OR: 0.25 [0.10-0.62]). This meta-analysis shows that the risk of first thrombotic event is significantly decreased by low dose aspirin among asymptomatic aPL individuals, patients with SLE or obstetrical APS. Importantly, no significant risk reduction was observed when considering only prospective studies or those with the best methodological quality.
    Autoimmunity reviews 11/2013; DOI:10.1016/j.autrev.2013.10.014 · 7.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. The objectives of this study are to examine the efficacy and safety of low-dose aspirin (LDA) vs LDA plus low-intensity warfarin (LDA + W) in the primary thrombosis prevention of aPL-positive patients with SLE and/or obstetric morbidity and the role of clinical and serological markers in the development of thrombosis.Methods. In this 5-year prospective, randomized, open, controlled trial, 166 patients with aPL were randomly assigned using a minimization protocol to receive treatment with LDA (n = 82) or LDA + W [international normalized ratio (INR) = 1.5] (n = 84). Sixty-six patients who declined randomization were followed up in an observational arm. Clinical and laboratory characteristics and medication side effects were recorded.Results. There were no differences in the number of thromboses between patients treated with LDA (4/82) or LDA + W (4/84) [hazard ratio (HR) 1.07, 95% CI 0.27, 4.3]. The incidence of thrombosis in the randomized patients was 8/166 (1.8 events/100 person-years) (HR 1.07, 95% CI 0.27, 4.3) and in the observational arm was 7/66 (4.9 events/100 person-years) (HR 2.43, 95% CI 0.87, 6.79). Sixty-five of 66 patients included in the observational arm received LDA. None of the examined clinical or serological factors appeared to predict thrombosis. Medication side effects included mild gastrointestinal symptoms in the LDA group (n = 2) and bleeding in the LDA + W group (n = 11; 1 nasal and 10 menorrhagia). The risk difference for bleeding was 13% (CI 6, 20).Conclusion. No differences in the number of thromboses were observed between patients treated with LDA vs those treated with LDA + W. More episodes of bleeding were detected in the LDA + W group. The LDA + W regime was significantly less safe and not as acceptable as LDA alone.Trial registration. ISRCTN81818945; http://isrctn.org/.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 10/2013; 53(2). DOI:10.1093/rheumatology/ket313 · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the evolution of valve involvement and myocardial dysfunction over time in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with or without antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) and/or antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). From an initial cohort of 150 patients assessed by transthoracic echocardiography 10 years ago, 17 patients with primary APS (PAPS), 23 with SLE-associated APS (SLE/APS), 19 with SLE positive for aPL without APS, and 23 with SLE negative for aPL were re-evaluated in the present echocardiography study. Valvulopathy was detected in 65% of PAPS and 62% of SLE patients with or without aPL. Disease duration [odds ratio (OR), 1.63; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.13-2.36; p = 0.009 for every 5 years of increase] and presence of SLE/APS (OR, 3.51; 95% CI, 1.27-9.67; p = 0.015) were the only factors associated with the progression of valvular disease in univariate and multivariate analyses. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction similarly progressed over time, with deceleration time (DT) and isovolumic relaxation time (IVRT) being equally prolonged in each of the four groups (p < 0.05). Right ventricular DT was significantly prolonged in each of the three SLE patient groups (p < 0.001), whereas IVRT increased only in SLE/APS patients (p = 0.040). Among patients with APS and SLE (with or without aPL), SLE/APS and disease duration were independent factors for valvular disease progression in the present 10-year follow-up echocardiography study. Anticoagulation did not arrest valvular disease progression. Ventricular diastolic dysfunction, primarily of the left ventricle, also progressed over the 10-year period.
    Seminars in arthritis and rheumatism 09/2013; 43(4). DOI:10.1016/j.semarthrit.2013.07.016 · 3.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Relapsing catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome potential role of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia in disease relapses. Espinosa G, Rodríguez-Pintó I, Gomez-Puerta JA, Pons-Estel G, Cervera R; Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome (CAPS) Registry Project Group (European Forum on Antiphospholipid Antibodies). Collaborators (69)Cervera R, Espinosa G, Rodríguez I, Piette JC, Shoenfeld Y, Abu- Shakra M, Allievi A, Amigo MC, Barile-Fabris L, Boffa JJ, Boffa MC, Chávez I, Chapman J, Davidson C, Denes AE, Derenne S, Derksen RH, Coto JF, Disdier P, Egan RM, Ehrenfeld M, Sheba C, Enriquez R, Erkan D, Falcini F, Fang LS, García-Carrasco M, Gomez-Puerta JA, Grandone JT, Gurjal A, Hayem G, Hughes GR, Inam S, Kant KS, Khamashta MA, Thomas S, Kupferminc MJ, de Larrañaga G, Levy RA, Lockshin MD, Lui SF, Maddison PJ, Mekori YA, Menahem S, Miyamae T, Moore J, Moutsopoulos HM, Muñoz-Rodríguez FJ, Musial J, Nakajima A, Neuwelt MC, Parke A, Praprotnik S, Roca B, Rojas-Rodriguez J, Roldan R, Sawitzke AD, Schaar CG, Sipek-Dolnicar A, Spyropoulos AC, Sinico R, Stojanovich L, Tan D, Tektonidou M, Vasconcelos C, Veloso MP, Wislowska M, Yinh J, You W. SourceDepartment of Autoimmune Diseases, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. gespino@clinic.ub.es Abstract OBJECTIVE: To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients with catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) who suffer relapses. METHODS: We analyzed the Web site--based international registry of patients with catastrophic APS ("CAPS Registry") http://infmed.fcrb.es/es/web/caps and selected those cases that relapsed. RESULTS: Relapses were reported in 9 of 282 (3.2%) patients with catastrophic APS. A total of 35 episodes of catastrophic APS were found: 6 patients presented 2 relapses, 2 patients suffered 3 relapses, and 1 patient developed 17 relapses. However, the last patient was not included in the statistical analysis because his clinical and immunologic characteristics were not fully described. Therefore, a total of 18 episodes were analyzed. In 9 (50%) episodes, a precipitating factor was identified. The most frequent precipitating factor, found in 5 (28%) episodes, was infection. Brain, kidney, heart, and lung were the most common organs involved. Laboratory features of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MHA) were present in 13 of 18 (72%) episodes (definitive in 9, corresponding to 4 patients, and probable in 4, corresponding to 2 patients). Three relapses did not present with features of MHA and in the remaining 2 these data were not reported. The mortality rate was 38%. CONCLUSIONS: Although relapses are rare in patients with catastrophic APS, these results support the hypothesis that an association between MHA and relapsing of catastrophic APS could be present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism 07/2013; · 3.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Objective. To determine the expression of soluble TNF-like cytokine 1A (sTL1A), a new member of the TNF superfamily, in patients with AS.Methods. Seventy-five consecutive patients with AS [61 males, mean (s.d.) age: 47.2 (15.5) years, disease duration: 20.3 (13.9) years] were included in this study. Forty-four patients were anti-TNF treatment naïve, whereas the remaining patients were on infliximab (n = 21), adalimumab (n = 3) or etanercept (n = 7). The patients' perceived disease activity was recorded by BASDAI and AS DAS using serum CRP levels (ASDAS-CRP), whereas functional status was assessed by BASFI and measurements of spinal mobility (AS Metrology). Serum concentrations of TL1A were measured by ELISA. Twenty-five age- and sex-matched healthy individuals served as controls.Results. Anti-TNF treatment-naïve patients demonstrated a 2.6-fold higher sTL1A average value [mean (s.e.m.) 581 (157.5) pg/ml] compared with healthy controls [226.7 (48.24) pg/ml, P = 0.042]. The sTL1A levels of anti-TNF-treated patients [178 (42)] were significantly lower than anti-TNF treatment-naïve patients (3.3-fold decrease, P = 0.0038) and comparable to those of healthy controls. No significant association was found between sTL1A level and functional status (BASFI score, AS Metrology parameters) or CRP measured in the same sera; however, a positive correlation was observed between individual levels of sTL1A and both BASDAI (P = 0.008) and ASDAS-CRP (P = 0.058) scores suggesting that sTL1A levels may reflect disease activity in patients with AS.Conclusion. TL1A is up-regulated in AS, associates with disease activity and is influenced by anti-TNF treatment, suggesting that TL1A may be of pathogenic and potentially of therapeutic importance in AS patients.
    Rheumatology (Oxford, England) 11/2012; 52(3). DOI:10.1093/rheumatology/kes316 · 4.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To develop recommendations for the management of adult and paediatric lupus nephritis (LN). The available evidence was systematically reviewed using the PubMed database. A modified Delphi method was used to compile questions, elicit expert opinions and reach consensus. Immunosuppressive treatment should be guided by renal biopsy, and aiming for complete renal response (proteinuria <0.5 g/24 h with normal or near-normal renal function). Hydroxychloroquine is recommended for all patients with LN. Because of a more favourable efficacy/toxicity ratio, as initial treatment for patients with class III-IV(A) or (A/C) (±V) LN according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathology Society 2003 classification, mycophenolic acid (MPA) or low-dose intravenous cyclophosphamide (CY) in combination with glucocorticoids is recommended. In patients with adverse clinical or histological features, CY can be prescribed at higher doses, while azathioprine is an alternative for milder cases. For pure class V LN with nephrotic-range proteinuria, MPA in combination with oral glucocorticoids is recommended as initial treatment. In patients improving after initial treatment, subsequent immunosuppression with MPA or azathioprine is recommended for at least 3 years; in such cases, initial treatment with MPA should be followed by MPA. For MPA or CY failures, switching to the other agent, or to rituximab, is the suggested course of action. In anticipation of pregnancy, patients should be switched to appropriate medications without reducing the intensity of treatment. There is no evidence to suggest that management of LN should differ in children versus adults. Recommendations for the management of LN were developed using an evidence-based approach followed by expert consensus.
    Annals of the rheumatic diseases 07/2012; 71(11):1771-82. DOI:10.1136/annrheumdis-2012-201940 · 9.27 Impact Factor
  • Maria G Tektonidou, Michael M Ward
    12/2011; DOI:10.1002/acr.21561
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    ABSTRACT: We present a case of an unusual clinical manifestation of Guillain-Barre syndrome following a pre-existing herpes virus infection. Although there have been several reports describing the co-existence of herpes virus infection and Guillain-Barre syndrome, we undertook a more in-depth study of the cross-reactivity between herpes viruses and recommend a follow-up study based on serology tests. A 39-year-old healthy Caucasian man with Guillain-Barre syndrome presented to our facility initially with sensory disturbance, followed by an atypical descending pattern of clinical progression. On physical examination, our patient showed hot and cold temperature sensory disturbance under the T4 vertebrae level, symmetrically diminished muscle power mainly to his lower limbs, blurred vision, a loss of taste and paresis and diminished reflexes of his lower limbs. Serology test results for common viruses on hospital admission were positive for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M, cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G, herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M, herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin G, Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin M, and varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin G, borderline for Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin G and negative for varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin M. At one month after hospital admission his test results were positive for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M, cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G, herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin G, Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin G, varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin G, borderline for herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M and negative for Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin M and varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin M. At his six month follow-up, tests were positive for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin G, herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin M, herpes simplex virus immunoglobulin G, Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin G and varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin G and negative for cytomegalovirus immunoglobulin M, Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin M and varicella zoster virus immunoglobulin M. The clinical manifestation of Guillain-Barre syndrome in our patient followed a combined herpes virus infection. The cross-reactivity between these human herpes viruses may have a pathogenic as well as evolutionary significance. Our patient showed seroconversion at an early stage of Epstein-Barr virus immunoglobulin M to immunoglobulin G antibodies, suggesting that Epstein-Barr virus might have been the cause of this syndrome. Even if this case is not the first of its kind to be reported, it may contribute to a better understanding of the disease and the cross-reaction mechanisms of herpes virus infections. This case report may have a broader clinical impact across more than one area of medicine, suggesting that cooperation between different specialties is always in the patient's best interest.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 12/2011; 5(1):563. DOI:10.1186/1752-1947-5-563
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin 6 (IL-6)-mediated interactions have been associated with sleep disturbances in healthy subjects. In this pilot study we examined whether administration of the IL-6 receptor antagonist tocilizumab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects sleep disturbances. Fifteen patients (13 women) with sleep disturbances at baseline received 6 monthly infusions of tocilizumab 8 mg/kg for moderately or severely active RA. Sleep quality was assessed by Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), daytime sleepiness by Epworth Sleepiness Scale, disease activity by the 28-joint Disease Activity Score-erythrocyte sedimentation rate, functional disability by Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Index (HAQ-DI), and fatigue by the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT-Fatigue Scale; FFS) at baseline and first, second, third, and sixth month of treatment. Medications used before enrollment remained unchanged during followup. Sleep quality improved and daytime sleepiness decreased significantly at first-month assessment (p < 0.00001 and p < 0.004, respectively, by repeated measurement analysis) compared to baseline, and these changes became more evident through 6 months. Disease activity decreased, fatigue decreased, and functional status improved significantly. Changes in PSQI score over time were not associated with the corresponding changes in DAS28-ESR (r = 0.37, p = 0.17), but correlated significantly with HAQ-DI changes (r = 0.60, p = 0.02) and marginally with changes in FFS scores (r = -0.46, p = 0.08). Improvement of sleep quality after tocilizumab treatment in patients with RA does not appear to directly result from decreased disease activity, further suggesting that aberrant IL-6 regulation is associated with sleep disturbances.
    The Journal of Rheumatology 12/2011; 39(1):60-2. DOI:10.3899/jrheum.110617 · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In the MAINTAIN Nephritis Trial, azathioprine (AZA) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) were compared as maintenance immunosuppressive treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) after a short-course of intravenous cyclophosphamide. Here, we compare the pathological findings on repeat kidney biopsies between the two groups. Per protocol, repeat renal biopsies were obtained in 30 patients (16 AZA and 14 MMF) at 2 years (±6 months). Baseline and follow-up biopsies were graded according to the International Society of Nephrology/Renal Pathological Society (ISN/RPS) classification. The activity and chronicity indices (AI, CI) were calculated using two different semiquantitative scoring systems (Morel-Maroger and National Institutes of Health). Statistics were performed by non-parametric tests. The clinical characteristics of the 30 re-biopsied patients only marginally differ from the entire MAINTAIN cohort (105 patients). Clinical baseline and follow-up characteristics of AZA- and MMF-treated re-biopsied patients did not differ. Time (SD) to repeat renal biopsy was 25.0 (2.0) and 26.5 (3.3) months in AZA and MMF patients, respectively. More patients had normal renal biopsies or Classes I/II/V LN at follow-up compared to baseline and conversely, less patients had Class IV LN at follow-up. In both groups, the AI statistically decreased at follow-up compared to baseline, while the CI slightly, but significantly, increased. No differences could be detected between the groups. Centralized pathological analyses, including ISN/RPS classification and comparisons of AI/CI, failed to find differences between MMF and AZA at 2 years, a result well in line with the absence of difference in long-term clinical outcome reported elsewhere.
    Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation 11/2011; 27(5):1924-30. DOI:10.1093/ndt/gfr553 · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    Maria G Tektonidou, Michael M Ward
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    ABSTRACT: Biomarkers have an important influence on the clinical decision-making processes involved in diagnosis, assessment of disease activity, allocation of treatment, and determining prognosis. The clinical usefulness of a biomarker is dependant on demonstration of its validity. Ideally, biomarkers should provide information not available from currently available tests and should be tested as they would be used in clinical practice; however, potential biomarkers could be affected by many different clinical or patient variables-such as disease activity, therapeutic intervention, or the presence of comorbidities--and validation studies might not include all the design features that are required to ensure that the biomarker is a true measure of the clinical process it is intended to reflect. In this Review, we appraise studies that have been conducted to validate six promising new biomarkers for diagnosis, disease activity assessment, or prognosis in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases. We discuss the validity of these six biomarkers with particular reference to the features of the studies that lend weight to or distract from their findings. The intent of this discussion is to draw attention to elements of validation study design that should be considered when evaluating the robustness of a biomarker, which differ according to the marker's intended use.
    Nature Reviews Rheumatology 11/2011; 7(12):708-17. DOI:10.1038/nrrheum.2011.157 · 10.25 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
319.16 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2015
    • National Technical University of Athens
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2014
    • National and Kapodistrian University of Athens
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2009–2013
    • Laiko Hospital
      • Department of Radiology
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2009–2012
    • Harokopion University of Athens
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2010
    • National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 2007–2010
    • Κωνσταντοπούλειο νοσοκομείο Νέας Ιωνίας (Η Αγία Όλγα)
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2003–2008
    • Ευρωκλινική
      Athínai, Attica, Greece
  • 2000–2003
    • University of Ioannina
      Yannina, Epirus, Greece