W. Todd Rogers

University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

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Publications (25)11.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The Bookmark method for setting cut-scores was used to re-set the cut-score for the Canadian Forces Firefighter Physical Fitness Maintenance Evaluation (FF PFME). The time required to complete 10 tasks that together simulate a first-response firefighting emergency was accepted as a measure of work capacity. A panel of 25 Canadian Forces firefighter supervisors set cut-scores in three rounds. Each round involved independent evaluation of nine video work samples, where the times systematically increased from 400 seconds to 560 seconds. Results for Round 1 were discussed before moving to Round 2 and results for Round 2 were discussed before moving to Round 3. Accounting for the variability among panel members at the end of Round 3, a cut-score of 481 seconds (mean Round 3 plus 2 SEM) was recommended. Firefighters who complete the FF PFME in 481 seconds or less have the physical capacity to complete first-response firefighting work.
    Ergonomics 08/2014; · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that low back pain (LBP) is a condition with an unpredictable pattern of exacerbation, remission and recurrence. However, there is an incomplete understanding of the course of LBP and the determinants of the course. To identify clusters of LBP patients with similar fluctuating pain patterns over time and investigate whether demographic and clinical characteristics can distinguish these clusters. This study was a secondary analysis of data extracted from a randomized controlled trial. Pain scores were collected from 155 participants with chronic nonspecific LBP. Pain intensity was measured once a month over one year by mobile phone. Cluster analysis was used to identify participants with similar fluctuating patterns of pain based on the pain measures collected over a year. We used t-tests to evaluate if the clusters differed in terms of baseline characteristics. The clusters analysis revealed the presence of 3 main clusters, two of which were considered to be of fluctuating nature. Overall, 21 (13.5%) of individuals had fluctuating pain. Baseline disability (Roland Morris,-24) and treatment groups (from the initial randomized controlled trial) were significantly different between clusters of patients with fluctuating pain or not. Limitations of this study include the fact that participants were undergoing treatment, which could ultimately be responsible for the rather positive prognosis observed. We have identified a small number of patients with fluctuating patterns of pain over time. This number may increase if individuals with episodic pain are included within this fluctuating group.
    Physical Therapy 09/2013; · 2.78 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The development of competency frameworks, such as CanMEDS, has helped define professional behavior, but programs that translate their theoretical aspects into practical learning are lacking. Aim: To improve instruction of the CanMEDS framework, the University of Alberta implemented a program in which 83 first-year medical students shadowed a first-year resident for eight months. Methods: A randomized trial compared participants' attitudes and knowledge regarding CanMEDS to controls. A concurrent-triangulation mixed methods design with questionnaires and interviews provided a comprehensive understanding of program experiences. Results: Students reported increasing their understanding of CanMEDS and increased their acceptance of the framework's importance and knowledge of its contents when compared to controls. Residents also reported that their knowledge of CanMEDS had increased. Participants considered the program to be effective for learning CanMEDS and developing professionalism, especially when paired with clinical encounters relevant to given professional roles. Conclusion: This simple, low cost, near-peer shadowing program can be useful for teaching professional behavior.
    Medical Teacher 08/2012; · 1.82 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The preparation of medical students for clerkship has been criticized, in terms of both students understanding of their new role as clinical trainees and their ability to carry out that role. To begin to address this gap, the authors report the development, implementation, and assessment of a novel program in which first-year medical students shadow first-year residents during their clinical duties. The program matches each student to a single resident, whom they shadow for several hours, once per month, for eight months. In the programs inaugural year (2009-10), 83 student-resident pairs participated; over 70% responded to pre- and post-intervention questionnaires, which included an 18-item preparedness scale. The authors used those responses to evaluate the program. Compared to students in a control group, the students in the program assessed themselves as better prepared to learn in a clinical setting. The low-cost student-resident shadowing program described in this article provided an early and structured introduction to the clinical environment, which may help prepare students for the transition into clerkship.
    Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 07/2012; 87(9):1288-91. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • W. Todd Rogers, Jie Lin, Christia M. Rinaldi
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    ABSTRACT: The evidence gathered in the present study supports the use of the simultaneous development of test items for different languages. The simultaneous approach used in the present study involved writing an item in one language (e.g., French) and, before moving to the development of a second item, translating the item into the second language (e.g., English) and checking to see that both language versions of the item mean the same. The evidence collected through the item development stage suggested that the simultaneous test development method allowed the influence and integration of information from item writers representing different language and cultural groups to affect test development directly. Certified English/French translators and interpreters and the French Immersion students confirmed that the test items in French and English had comparable meanings. The pairs of test forms had equal standard errors of measurement. The source of differential item functioning was not attributable to the adaptation process used to produce the two language forms, but to the lack of French language proficiency as well as other unknown sources. Lastly, the simultaneous approach used in the present study was somewhat more efficient than the forward translation procedure currently in use.
    Applied Measurement in Education 01/2011; 24(1):39-70. · 0.37 Impact Factor
  • Don A. Klinger, W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: The intent of this study was to examine the views of teachers regarding the appropriateness of the purposes and uses of the provincial assessments in Alberta and Ontario and the seriousness of the concerns raised about these assessments. These provinces represent educational jurisdictions that use large-scale assessments within a low-stakes accountability framework in which the results are intended to be used to support school-based improvement efforts. Despite being implemented at different times (1982–Alberta; 1996–Ontario), teachers in both provinces appear to hold relatively similar views about the testing programs in their own provinces and the issues associated with these programs. Teachers’ concerns regarding the use of these assessments for accountability purposes and the potential misuses of the results appear to be a dominant influence on teachers’ generally low ratings of other purposes and uses of the assessments in both provinces, including those related to improving instruction and learning.
    International Journal of Testing. 01/2011; 11(2):122-143.
  • Laurie-ann M. Hellsten, W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to collect preliminary validity evidence for a time management scale for exercise. An initial pool of 91 items was developed from existing literature. Ten exercise/health psychologists evaluated each of the items in terms of relevance and representativeness. Forty-nine items met all criteria. Exploratory factor analysis of the initial pool of items with a sample of 501 undergraduate students revealed an interpretable 32-item, 4-factor solution: exercise importance, exercise documentation, perceived ability to manage time for exercise, and setting exercise goals. Internal consistency values ranged from 0.73 to 0.91. Time management for exercise appears to be related to exercise behavior as indicated by moderate correlations between each of the subscales and exercise behavior.
    Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science 01/2009; 13(1):13-33.
  • Philip M. Wilson, W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to examine the proposition that psychological need satisfaction plays a role in the motives regulating exercise behavior. Participants completed self-report instruments assessing perceived psychological need satisfaction and exercise regulation at the outset and end of a 12-week structured exercise class. Greater perceived psychological need satisfaction predicted endorsement of more self-determined exercise regulations in the structural equation modeling analysis. Change score analyses revealed that increased perceived need fulfillment was positively correlated with more self-determined exercise regulations, although this pattern was most prominent for competence and autonomy. Collectively, these findings indicate perceptions of competence and autonomy—and to a lesser extent relatedness—and represent important factors shaping exercise motivation. Continued investigation of basic psychological need fulfillment via exercise appears justified.
    Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research 12/2008; 13(3):119 - 142.
  • Don A. Klinger, W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Driven largely by calls for accountability, the use of large‐scale testing is expanding in terms of the number and purposes of testing programmes. At the same time, financial constraints have resulted in attempts to reduce the lengths of such examinations. An examination of the 1994/1995 and 1995/1996 British Columbia Scholarship programme illustrates that differential and unanticipated differences can occur when such changes to the testing programme are made. The removal of a portion of the constructed‐response (CR) and written tasks (WT) items used to identify scholarship recipients resulted in differences in scholarship scores and the identification of scholarship recipients. Further, the differences were found to affect subgroups of students differentially. While there were no differences attributed to gender, higher difference rates were associated with course area (humanities vs. science) or examination session (January vs. June). The results illustrate the complex and contextual impact of changes to examination programmes and the potential consequences of such changes. Test developers and users must make more of an effort to examine the consequences of examination programmes and planned changes upon the students and others who may be affected by the results.
    Assessment in Education Principles Policy and Practice 03/2006; 13(1):29-43.
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    ABSTRACT: Large-scale scale testing agencies, which are generally located within provincial ministries of education and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, have called for secondary data analysis of test and survey data that link contextual and educational factors to student performance. First, the potential of secondary analyses is outlined, followed by discussion of seven pitfalls that need to be addressed to realize this potential in Canada. Greater collaboration between testing agencies and teams of qualified secondary analysis researchers needs to take place to ensure that policy issues relevant to education are addressed in meaningful ways. /// Les organismes responsables des épreuves communes, qui relèvent généralement des ministères provinciaux de l'Éducation et du Conseil des ministres de l'Éducation (Canada), ont demandé une analyse de deuxième ordre des données d'épreuves et d'enquêtes reliant des facteurs contextuels et pédagogiques au rendement des élèves. Le potentiel des analyses de deuxième ordre est d'abord présenté; suit une discussion des sept écueils à éviter pour en tirer profit au Canada. Une meilleure collaboration entre les organismes responsables des tests et les équipes de chercheurs spécialisés dans les analyses de deuxième ordre doit être mise en place afin d'assurer que les questions de politiques en matière d'éducation sont abordées de manière pertinente.
    Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l éducation 01/2006; 29(3):757-770.
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    ABSTRACT: This study identified student and school-level factors associated with student achievement on the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT), an examination that includes a student questionnaire examining home literacy practices. Linked student and school contextual data enabled the use of hierarchical linear modeling to complete the analyses and examine both student and school level effects. Fourteen student and three school level variables were found to be associated with students' reading achievement and twelve student and two school level variables were associated with writing. Significant variations between schools were also found for students with individualized education plans, English as a second language, or previous eligibility on the OSSLT. /// Dans cette étude, les auteurs ont identifié les facteurs élèves et niveaux scolaires associés au rendement scolaire dans le Test de compétences linguistiques de l'Ontario, un examen qui comprend un questionnaire pour les élèves au sujet des habitudes en matière de littératie à la maison. Des données reliées aux élèves et au contexte scolaire ont permis l'utilisation d'une modélisation linéaire hiérarchique en vue de compléter les analyses et d'étudier les effets quant aux élèves et aux niveaux scolaires. Les auteurs ont établi que quatorze variables ayant trait aux élèves et trois ayant trait aux niveaux scolaires étaient associées au rendement des élèves en matière de lecture et que douze variables ayant trait aux élèves et deux ayant trait aux niveaux scolaires étaient associées à l'écriture. Des écarts importants entre les écoles ont également été notés chez les élèves ayant des programmes pédagogiques sur mesure, inscrits en anglais langue seconde ou déjà admissibles au Test de compétences linguistiques des écoles secondaires de l'Ontario.
    Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l éducation 01/2006; 29(3):771-797.
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    ABSTRACT: This study explored the relationships between student achievement and student, school and home variables from the pan-Canadian assessment program administered by the Council of Ministers of Education Canada (CMEC): the School Achievement Indicators Program (SAIP) Mathematics 2001. The study also evaluated the datasets used in relationship to their utility for statistical modeling of school performance. Student beliefs about mathematics are positively related to mathematics achievement for both age groups and for both domains of mathematics. As students' use of instructional supports (parental assistance with mathematics homework, computers in the mathematics classroom) increases, there is an associated decrease in mathematics scores. /// Dans cet article, les auteurs explorent les relations entre le rendement scolaire et certaines caractéristiques des élèves, des écoles et de l'environnement familial à partir des données du programme d'évaluation pancanadien du Conseil des ministres de l'Éducation (Canada) (CMEC), le Programme d'indicateurs du rendement scolaire (PIRS) 2001 en mathématiques. L'étude évalue également les bases de données au regard de leur pertinence pour la modélisation statistique de la performance scolaire. Les auteurs notent une corrélation directe entre les idées que se font les élèves au sujet des mathématiques et le rendement en mathématiques tant pour les groupes d'âge que pour les domaines des mathématiques. Plus les élèves font appel à du soutien pédagogique (aide des parents pour les devoirs de mathématiques, ordinateurs dans les classes de mathématiques), plus les notes en mathématiques diminuent.
    Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l éducation 01/2006; 29(3):706-730.
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to provide initial construct validity evidence for scores derived from the Psychological Need Satisfaction in Exercise (PNSE) scale, a multidimensional instrument designed to measure perceived psychological need satisfaction in line with Deci and Ryanʼs (1985, 2002) self-determination theory (SDT). Participants in two studies (n1 = 426; n2 = 581) completed the PNSE along with proxy measures of need satisfaction. The results of an exploratory factor analysis in Study 1 supported the retention of a 3-factor measurement model underpinning PNSE responses. Confi rmatory factor analysis conducted in Study 2 corroborated the tenability of the 3-factor measurement model in males and females and indicated partial support for invariance of PNSE scores across gender. Additionally, the scores on both the PNSE-Competence and PNSE-Relatedness subscales displayed a pattern of convergence with proxy measures. High internal consistency estimates (Cronbach α > 0.90) were observed for all PNSE subscale scores, and participants in both studies reported high levels of need satisfaction in exercise contexts. Overall, the fi ndings suggest that the PNSE displays a number of psychometric characteristics that render the instrument useful for examining psychological need satisfaction in exercise contexts.
    Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology 01/2006; 28. · 2.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we identified factors that influence the academic performance of grade-6 students in a large city school system in language arts and mathematics. For language arts, five student variables, seven class variables, and two school level variables accounted for approximately 50 per cent, 75 per cent, and 90 per cent of the initial variability at the corresponding levels. For mathematics, seven student, five class, and three school level variables accounted for approximately 40 per cent, 60 per cent, and 90 per cent of the initial variability at the school level. Taken together, the results reveal that the majority of variability is at the student level, and additional variables need to be identified to better explain the variability at this level. /// Dans cette étude portant sur le système scolaire d'une grande ville, les auteurs identifient les facteurs ayant une incidence sur le rendement scolaire d'élèves de $6^{\text{e}}$ année en langue (anglais) et en mathématiques. Pour le domaine de la langue, cinq variables ayant trait aux élèves expliquent environ la moitié de la variabilité initiale quant aux élèves, sept variables ayant trait à la classe expliquent environ 75% de la variabilité initiale quant aux classes et deux variables ayant trait à l'école, environ 90% de la variabilité initiale quant aux écoles. En mathématiques, sept variables ayant trait aux élèves, cinq ayant trait aux classes et trois aux écoles expliquent respectivement environ 40%, 60% et 90% de la variabilité initiale. Pris en bloc, les résultats révèlent que la majeure partie de la variabilité se situe au niveau des élèves et que d'autres variables doivent être identifiées afin de mieux expliquer la variabilité à ce niveau.
    Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l éducation 01/2006; 29(3):731-756.
  • W. Todd Rogers, Don A. Klinger
    Canadian Journal of Education / Revue canadienne de l éducation 01/2005; 28(3):535-540.
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    01/2003;
  • W. Todd Rogers, Teresa Dawber
    International Journal of Testing 06/2002; 2(2):161-168.
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    W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Developed in response to examples of unacceptable assessment practices, the Principles for Fair Student Assessment Practices for Education in Canada contains a set of principles and guidelines generally accepted by professional organisations as indicative of fair assessment practice within the Canadian educational context. Assessments depend on professional judgment: the ’Principles’ identify the issues to consider in exercising this professional judgment and in striving for the fair and equitable assessment of all students.
    Canadian Journal of School Psychology 11/1996; 3(3):397-400.
  • W. Todd Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: A comparison of the current status of measurement with that in 1981 when the predecessor of the Program Evaluation Standards was published reveals a number of changes, the most fundamental of which is the way in which we look at validity. The evolution of the changes made to validity is briefly traced beginning with Guilford (1946) and ending with the writings of Cronbach (1989), Messick (1989a), Kane (1992), and Shepard (1993). Pragmatic and continuous in nature, the validity inquiry process outlined in the Standards calls for the types of data and information identified by Cronbach (1971, 1989) and Messick (1989a). But, like Shepard (1993) and, to some degree, Kane (1992), the process is clearly focused in terms of the evaluation questions to be addressed. This close fit between what is called for in the Standards and what appears in the current literature is not surprising given the influence of this literature. Further, that the validity inquiry is clearly focused in terms of the evaluation question(s) is explained by the service orientation that an evaluation ought to have.
    Journal of Experimental Education - J EXP EDUC. 01/1994; 63(1):13-28.
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    Mark J Gierl, W Todd Rogers, Don Klinger
    05/2002;