B.E. Bishop

United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, United States

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Publications (50)18.04 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Over the past four years, undergraduate students in the Systems Engineering degree program at the United States Naval Academy (USNA) have pursued autonomous sailboat systems development as part of their required capstone project in conjunction with students from the Naval Architecture program that design and fabricate the vessels. In this paper, we discuss the pedagogy of robotic sailing as a capstone for Systems Engineering students and discuss our approach to interdisciplinary tasks such as this. We also outline the design philosophy associated with the systems side of the equation, focusing on the on-board instrumentation and control hardware.
    12/2010: pages 87-99;
  • R.S. Wolcott, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the development of a methodology by which multiple sentry guns can effectively engage and destroy multiple targets in a coordinated attack. The centralized coordination controller developed in this work utilizes the capability function concept to provide a framework for cooperative weapons engagement on multiple targets with specified priorities while allowing for additional objectives.
    System Theory, 2009. SSST 2009. 41st Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2009
  • Patrick D. Healy, Bradley E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the design of an amphibious robot for operations support in the littoral zone (close to shore). The mission of the robot is to escort assaulting marines to and from the beachhead. This robot will also offer reconnaissance and escort alongside convoys. The robot will possess positive buoyancy and demonstrate dual locomotion for both land and sea, modeled after the Marines' AAV. It will carry a teleoperated weapon and will be controlled by the remote operator using standard R/C gear and camera feedback.
    Southeastern Symposium on System Theory. 01/2009;
  • B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a method utilizing manipulability concepts and redundant manipulator analogs for swarm manipulation of a rigid object in the plane using autonomous surface vessels. The key concepts involve maximizing some metric defined in relation to a manipulability ellipsoid, which represents the mapping between applied thrust and configuration space accelerations for the object. By casting this problem in the framework of redundant manipulation, the proposed method can be carried out in real time, in a possibly changing environment, and can accommodate nonholonomic vehicles and thrust limits on the swarm. The controller includes attachment pose optimization, engagement control as the ASVs approach and attach to the object, and the manipulation control. Simulation studies demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methods.
    Robotics and Automation, 2008. ICRA 2008. IEEE International Conference on; 06/2008
  • J. Blank, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the development of a test bed and methodology by which moderate-fidelity dynamics can be determined for a high-speed autonomous surface vessel (ASV). The dynamics of planing craft are understood, but closed-form models are not available for controller design, and existing high- fidelity simulators require a great deal of computation, making them impractical for reactive control systems. In this work, we demonstrate a navigation system, its calibration and subsequent use for in-situ testing of the displacement mode dynamics of a small ASV intended for planing operation. Initial results are given for roll, pitch and thrust models.
    System Theory, 2008. SSST 2008. 40th Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2008
  • M.D. Byington, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the design of a decentralized controller for cooperative locomotion in a swarm of robotic agents. Each agent is assumed to be able to locomote over even terrain, grasp other robots, and climb onto a stack of robots. Genetic algorithms and genetic programming methods are applied to develop locomotion controllers for single units as well as decentralized controllers intended to allow the swarm of units to pass over uneven terrain that no single unit can surmount. The goal is to develop a system that provides a high probability of large numbers of units passing through sets of test obstacles. The results are shown through simulation exercises.
    System Theory, 2008. SSST 2008. 40th Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2008
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    E.A. Barnes, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the development of a methodology by which multiple, heterogeneous units can deliver discontinuous capability (such as that from a computer vision system) to a specified set of targets. The centralized coordination controller commands the units such that a specified level of capability is delivered to a set of target locations while accommodating obstacle avoidance and a spectrum of additional secondary objectives. The efficacy of the controller is demonstrated through simulation.
    System Theory, 2008. SSST 2008. 40th Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2008
  • C.M. Keegan, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This video presents results from an undergraduate research project involving the design and analysis of a lightweight multimode vehicle capable of driving on solid ground, swimming on the surface of the water, climbing up magnetic surfaces and easily transitioning between the three. Locomotion in and out of the water is provided by buoyant paddlewheels on each side of the vehicle. The climbing capability is achieved by the use of strip magnets mounted to each wheel. The physical design of the robot provides efficiency in and out of the water while considering a necessity for stealth, compactness, and minimal weight. This project has been designed with the expectation of adding autonomy to the vehicle.
    Intelligent Robots and Systems, 2007. IROS 2007. IEEE/RSJ International Conference on; 12/2007
  • B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a new abstraction method by which functional capabilities of a swarm of robots can be automatically distributed across a number of objectives. To demonstrate the framework, we provide a simulation study for a swarm of autonomous aerial vehicles performing a reconnaissance mission. The framework developed provides a novel methodology for real-time resource allocation for a wide variety of missions.
    Robotics and Automation, 2007 IEEE International Conference on; 05/2007
  • C.M. Keegan, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present preliminary results from an undergraduate research project involving the analysis and design of a lightweight multimode vehicle capable of driving on solid ground, swimming on the surface of the water, and easily transitioning between the two. Locomotion in and out of the water is provided by paddlewheels on each side of the vehicle. The physical design of the robot optimizes efficiency in and out of the water while accommodating the necessity for stealth, compactness, and minimal weight. This project has been designed with the expectation of possibly expanding to an autonomous version of the vehicle and also the potential addition of a mechanism for climbing up ferrous surfaces, such as the hull of a ship.
    System Theory, 2007. SSST '07. Thirty-Ninth Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2007
  • J. Bradshaw, C. Lollini, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the development of a sensing module, testing methodology and set of experiments for the use of an optical mouse chip as an odometer in mobile robotics, including in an educational setting at the undergraduate level. The test bed includes an integrated microprocessor, mounting board and lens system designed to overcome the basic height to surface and speed limitations on the optical mouse chip with the manufacturer-supplied lens. The finalized system can be used in a mobile robotics course segment on sensing and state estimation.
    System Theory, 2007. SSST '07. Thirty-Ninth Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2007
  • P.C. Butler, R.P. Kelley, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this undergraduate research paper, we discuss system modeling, mission design and software development for the control of a heterogeneous swarm of autonomous vehicles in combat. Primary focus was on swarm control, combat tactics, and swarm role-allocation.
    System Theory, 2007. SSST '07. Thirty-Ninth Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2007
  • B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this work we consider methods for dynamics-based control of swarms of cooperating differentially-driven mobile robots. The techniques developed enable the use of methods from redundant manipulator control and show a marked improvement over equivalent kinematics-based techniques for both homogeneous and heterogeneous swarms
    Robotics and Automation, 2006. ICRA 2006. Proceedings 2006 IEEE International Conference on; 06/2006
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    C.M. Reed, B.E. Bishop, J.K. Waters
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    ABSTRACT: This paper focuses on the process of selecting hardware for use in the design of a small autonomous surface vessel design. Hull form, powering and instrumentation are discussed, with hardware specifications and performance data. Existing mathematical models appropriate for the vessel are outlined and a discussion of model identification using traditional and in situ methods is presented
    System Theory, 2006. SSST '06. Proceeding of the Thirty-Eighth Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2006
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    ABSTRACT: In commonly used robotic texts, the introductory chapter defines robotics and explores the role of robotics in industry and society. This is followed by transformation matrices and forward and inverse kinematics. Homework, quizzes, and exams are used to reinforce lecture material. For some students, three-dimensional concepts and mathematical tools are obvious, but for others it is impossible to relate two-dimensional pictures (from a text or the board) to a three-dimensional reality. Furthermore, besides a poor grade, there is no immediate feedback on the consequences of incorrectly assigning coordinate frames or improperly deriving the inverse kinematics of a manipulator. This paper discusses laboratory assignments utilizing inexpensive hardware such as remote-controlled (RC) servomotors, ROBIX™ RCS-6 kits, and inexpensive vision systems such as CMU-cams and webcams. It is shown that low-cost systems are suitable for both reinforcing fundamental robotic concepts such as inverse kinematics and facilitating independent student research.
    International Journal of Engineering Education 01/2006; 22(4):723-731. · 0.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An approach to real-time trajectory generation for platoons of autonomous vehicles is developed from well-known control techniques for redundant robotic manipulators. The partially decentralized structure of this approach permits each vehicle to independently compute its trajectory in real-time using only locally generated information and low-bandwidth feedback generated by a system exogenous to the platoon. Our work is motivated by applications for which communications bandwidth is severely limited, such for platoons of autonomous underwater vehicles. The communication requirements for our trajectory generation approach are independent of the number of vehicles in the platoon, enabling platoons composed of a large number of vehicles to be coordinated despite limited communication bandwidth.
    IEEE Transactions on Systems Man and Cybernetics Part B (Cybernetics) 09/2005; · 3.24 Impact Factor
  • Yong Chye Tan, B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: This paper relates a hybridization of classical control and behavior-based methods for control of cooperating autonomous vehicles performing a search mission. The controller developed inherits the best characteristics of each of the approaches with few of the drawbacks. Simulation studies show the efficacy of the control for a simple mission.
    Robotics and Automation, 2005. ICRA 2005. Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on; 05/2005
  • B.E. Bishop
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    ABSTRACT: In this work we consider methods for control of platoons of cooperating nonholonomic vehicles using techniques based on redundant manipulator control. The class of tricycle-like robots is chosen, as it possesses significant limitations and represents a vast class of real vehicles with application beyond the basic differential drive. The method presented accounts for limitations on both steering and speed. The efficacy of the technique is shown through simulation studies.
    Robotics and Automation, 2005. ICRA 2005. Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Conference on; 05/2005
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present preliminary results from an undergraduate research project involving hardware and software development for a cooperative team of autonomous ground vehicles performing a search and rescue (SAR) operation. Key features of the proposed system are a novel localization method and cooperative target identification/situational evaluation using extremely low-cost hardware and simple user interfaces. The localization method relies on the use of technology from an optical computer mouse, which provides an innovative, low-computation solution for robot localization even on rough terrain. The proposed coordination scheme relies on low-bandwidth local communication, well suited to SAR environments, but also provides sufficient unit autonomy for the unstructured environment. Targets are located, identified and verified through cooperation and coordination of multiple viewpoints and data streams. The resulting system provides excellent flexibility, robustness and efficacy in a low-cost package.
    System Theory, 2005. SSST '05. Proceedings of the Thirty-Seventh Southeastern Symposium on; 04/2005
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    Bradley E. Bishop, Frederick L. Crabbe, Bryan M. Hudock
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we discuss the design of a novel robotic platform for Urban Search and Rescue (USAR). The system developed possesses unique mobility capabilities based on a new adjustable compliance mechanism and overall locomotive morphology. The main facets of this work involve the morphological concepts, initial design and construction of a prototype vehicle, and a physical simulation to be used for developing controllers for semi-autonomous (supervisory) operation.
    Advanced Robotics 01/2005; 19:879-899. · 0.51 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

469 Citations
18.04 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997–2010
    • United States Naval Academy
      • Department of Weapons & Systems Engineering
      Annapolis, Maryland, United States
  • 2003
    • Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Blacksburg, VA, United States
  • 1994–1996
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Coordinated Science Laboratory
      Urbana, Illinois, United States