Yoshihisa Shigedo

Osaka City University, Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan

Are you Yoshihisa Shigedo?

Claim your profile

Publications (12)17.51 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Quality of sleep in later life is a major concern, and sleep hygiene advice is often the first form of intervention used to treat sleep problem. However, with regard to sleep education, the efficacy in gender-specific medicine is not well known.
    American journal of men's health 04/2011; 8. · 1.15 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Presenteeism is the impaired work performance due to health problems. We aimed to develop a Presenteeism Scale for Students (PSS), and to reveal the existence of presenteeism among students. Students (n = 5,701) in 4 national universities in Japan were recruited via the school-based health examination. Moreover, 122 students participated in a 2-week interval test-retest to examine the reliability and criterion-related validity of the PSS. Of the students, 59.2% indicated some health problems. Allergy was most prevalent health problems, affecting 35.7% of the whole students. Students with emotional problems had higher degree of presenteeism than those with the other problems. The Cronbach's α of the work impairment score of the PSS was 0.90. The Spearman's coefficient for the test-retest score was 0.80 (P < 0.001). Regarding criterion-related validity, Spearman's coefficient between the work impairment score of the PSS and summary score of the SF-36 was -0.60 (P < 0.001). These findings suggest that the PSS can be expected to be useful for assessment of students with presenteeism. Furthermore, we found that the majority of students have some health problems, and proposed that the issue of presenteeism on campus should be addressed.
    Quality of Life Research 10/2010; 20(3):439-46. · 2.86 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Oxidative stress has gained attention recently in psychiatric medicine and has been reported to be associated with various diseases. However, the psychosocial factors involved in oxidative stress are still not well understood. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine whether anxiety levels and neuroticism were associated with serum oxidative and anti-oxidative status in healthy college students. Participants in this cross-sectional study were 54 non-smoking college students. Their serum oxidative status was determined by reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) and the biological anti-oxidant potential. Anxiety levels and neuroticism were assessed using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the NEO Five-Factor Inventory, respectively. Correlation analysis showed an association of increased ROM concentration with elevated anxiety levels (State, rho = 0.39, P = 0.046; Trait, rho = 0.44, P = 0.024) and the personality trait of neuroticism (rho = 0.47, P = 0.016) in female students. However, the ROM concentration in male students was not associated with the anxiety level or any personality trait. Although these findings suggest that neurotic and anxious female students tend to be exposed to oxidative stress, these linkages should be confirmed by multivariate analysis in future research.
    Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 08/2010; 64(4):435-41. · 2.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background and Objectives: Major depression and sub-threshold depressive symptoms are associated with health crisis. Oxidative stress may be a mechanism for major depression. In the present study, we examined the relationship between the degree of depressive symptoms and oxidative status using a reliable and inexpensive method that evaluates endogenous hydroperoxides. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 54 non-smoking college students and measured serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs) and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP) as an index of oxidative status. Depressive symptoms were assessed by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: The concentrations of ROMs did not differ between the lower BDI group (BDI < 14) and the higher BDI group (BDI > 14) (282.7 - 59.84 U.CARR vs 307.7 - 67.51 U.CARR, z = -1.19, P = 0.239). We did find a significant relationship between ROM concentration values and higher BDI scores (rho = 0.30, P = 0.042). BAP levels in the hig-her BDI group were not significantly greater than those in the lower BDI group (z = -0.108, P = 0.287). There was no significant correlation between BAP and depressive symptoms (rho = 0.22, P = 0.140). Moreover, we conducted a multiple regression analysis to control for gender difference and difference in sleep perception of the previous night between the two BDI groups. However, depressive symptoms were not significantly predicted by ROM concentrations (b = 0.28, P = 0.076). Conclusions: While results of the present study demonstrated a slight correlation between depressive symptoms and oxidative stress, this linkage could not be confirmed after controlling for significant confounding factors. This result should be verified in a larger sample.
    European Journal of Psychiatry 01/2010; 24(2):63-69. · 0.46 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigated changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in the relaxed condition in subjects who felt sleepy, but were unable to sleep. A total of 1021 subjects underwent daytime polysomnography. The sleep latency (SL) and the visual analog scale (VAS) were used to assess “immediate” objective and subjective sleepiness, respectively. The subjects were assigned to an “Alert-Alert” group (VAS ≤ 25 mm, SL ≥ 8 min), a “Sleepy-Alert” group (VAS ≥ 75 mm, SL ≥ 8 min), or a “Sleepy-Sleepy” group (VAS ≥ 75 mm, SL ≤ 4 min). In order to assess the ANS, the spectral analysis and the geometric method were used. The ANS data collected during the relaxed condition (after lights off, post-LO) was compared to that obtained during the control condition (before lights off, pre-LO). From the spectral analysis, a significant decrease of sympathetic function and an increase of parasympathetic function at post-LO in the Sleepy-Sleepy group, a tendency for sympathetic function decrease at post-LO in the Alert-Alert group, and no significant changes to sympathetic and parasympathetic function in the Sleepy-Alert group were observed. The results from the geometric method supported the results of the spectral analysis in the Alert-Alert group and the Sleepy-Sleepy group. The results of this study suggest that the ANS plays a role in individuals who are unable to sleep even though they feel sleepy and are given the opportunity to sleep.
    Sleep and Biological Rhythms 01/2009; 7:23-30. · 0.76 Impact Factor
  • Sleep and Biological Rhythms 04/2004; 2(s1):S4 - S4. · 1.05 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To assess the clinical utility of the frequencies of transient increases of pulse rate, non-invasively measured with a pulseoximeter, as an indirect indication of the degree of cortical arousal, measured conventionally on an electroencephalogram (EEG), in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients. Thirty-three consecutive patients referred with suspected OSAHS were studied. Polysomnography (PSG) with determination of esophageal pressure (Pes) and pulseoximetry was monitored to identify breathing-related EEG arousal (B-Ar) associated with apnea, hypopnea or respiratory effort and the frequencies of pulse rate increases. We also assessed the association of B-ArI (defined as the number of B-Ar per hour) with the pulse rate rise index (PRRI)-X(X=4-10) (defined as the number of pulse rate increases per hour). In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of PRRI for the assessment of a B-ArI cutoff point of 30 were calculated. The sensitivity and specificity of pulseoximetry for different thresholds of PRRI-X(X=4-10) demonstrated that the greatest diagnostic accuracy for detecting frequent arousal (B-ArI > or =30) occurs at a cutoff point of 40 PRRI-6 with a sensitivity of 0.88 and specificity of 0.86. This point shows a significant area under the curve of 0.84. In addition, a statistically significant correlation between PRRI-6 and B-ArI (r=0.68, P<0.0001) was observed. The transient increases in pulse rate measured by pulseoximetry during sleep may be a useful clinical marker for predicting the degree of arousal in OSAHS patients, and may, in addition, prevent cases with frequent respiratory effort related arousals from being overlooked. However, further studies are required to improve the confidence level of the PRRI and to investigate the causes of overestimation of EEG arousals.
    Sleep Medicine 11/2003; 4(6):537-42. · 3.10 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to calculate the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), which represented as the number of apnea-hypopnea occurrences per hour, the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI4) and the breathing-related arousal index (B-ArI) in polysomnographic studies of obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) patients and to investigate whether there was any relationship between each pair of scoring schemes. Thirty-four cases of OSAHS were studied. Total OSAHS patients were subdivided into those with a high AHI (> 25), and those with a low AHI (< 25). The correlation between each pair of scoring schemes for OSAHS with a high AHI showed high value. The correlation between AHI and ODI4 for OSAHS with a low AHI was 0.18 and that between AHI and B-ArI showed a weak correlation of 0.59, while that between ODI4 and B-ArI was only -0.078. Our results mean that oxygen desaturation and arousal occur separately in mild or moderate OSAHS patients, even though they are diagnosed with the same level of OSAHS by means of AHI. Breathing-related arousal without oxygen desaturation often occurs in mild or moderate OSAHS patients. We previously reported that AHI does not accurately reflect the severity of the increase in negativity of esophageal pressure manifested as respiratory efforts. We consider that the comprehension and assessment of OSAHS can be improved by the systematic differentiations among the three components: oxygen desaturation, arousals and respiratory efforts.
    Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 05/2003; 57(2):197-203. · 1.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: : Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is characterized by loss of normal voluntary muscle atonia during REM sleep, and is associated with excessive motor activity related to dreaming. The movements are often potentially harmful and may lead to repeated injuries to the patients and/or their bedpartners.RBD is more common in the elderly and affects predominantly males. A recent survey reported an estimated prevalence of RBD of 0.38% in the elderly and 0.5% in the general population. Because the treatment of RBD is effective and safe in most cases, awareness and diagnosis of RBD is critical. Overnight polysomnography is required to differentiate accurately between RBD and other sleep disorders, even though the patients have been clinically diagnosed as RBD according to the minimal criteria of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. Muscle tone persists during REM sleep in RBD patients, and may be frequently augmented for prolonged periods of time. The density of REMs or phasic muscle activity occurring during REM sleep significantly increases in these patients, although their overall sleep architecture is usually normal, with the expected cycles of non-REM and REM sleep.RBD occurs in both acute and chronic form. Acute cases are associated with intoxication and withdrawal. Chronic cases are most often either idiopathic or associated with neurological disorders—especially neurodegenerative diseases. The etiology of idiopathic RBD is still unknown, but a recent study has shown an association between some cases of idiopathic RBD and neurodegenerative disorders with parkinsonism such as Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy, and diffuse Lewy body disease. RBD patients thus need to be carefully followed up in terms of neurological evaluation.
    Psychogeriatrics 12/2001; 1(4). · 1.22 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Obesity is a common predisposition to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). By statistical analysis of the respondents to a questionnaire that was distributed to members of the Kansai Rugby Association, we examined whether weight gain increased the incidence of these diseases and whether GERD alone disturbs sleep. Prevalence distribution of GERD by age differed from another survey, which suggests that predispositions other than age may contribute to GERD. Weight gain tended to increase the incidence of GERD. In our epidemiological study, both GERD (particularly nocturnal reflux) and OSAS significantly contributed to sleep disturbance. Although GERD alone seemed to be one of several independent factors of sleep disturbance, it was not a weak factor.
    Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 07/2001; 55(3):255-6. · 1.62 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Severity of negative esophageal pressure (Pes) and apnea hypopnea index (AHI) were investigated in six cases of upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) and 11 cases of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The severity of negative Pes was represented by the highest peak (Pes Max) and the number of increased episodes (more than 13.5 cmH2O) per h (NPesI13.5). There was no significant correlation between Pes indices and AHI. Pes Max and NPesI13.5 were not different among severe OSAS (AHI > 30), mild OSAS (AHI < 30) and UARS. Apnea hypopnea index failed to represent the severity of negative Pes, which is an important aspect of the pathophysiology of sleep-disordered breathing.
    Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences 06/2000; 54(3):338-9. · 1.62 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Severity of negative esophageal pressure (Pes) and apnea hypopnea index (AHI) were investigated in 34 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). The OSAHS patients were diagnostically classified as having obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) or upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). Diagnosis of OSAS was based on an AHI of more than 5, and that of UARS on an AHI of less than 5, EEG arousals which were associated with apnea, hypopnea and/or respiratory effort occurring more than 10 times per hour, and daytime sleepiness. Negative Pes was represented by the greatest peak (NPes Max) and the number of increased (more than 13.5 cmH2O) episodes per hour (NPesI13.5). There was no significant correlation between the AHI and Pes indices, but NPes Max and NPesI13.5 showed significant correlation (p<0.01). NPes Max and NPesI13.5 showed no significant differences among the severe OSAS (AHI>50; 8 cases), moderate OSAS (50>AHI>15; 10 cases), mild OSAS (15>AHI>5; 9 cases) and UARS (7 cases) groups. We conclude that AHI does not reflect the severity of the increase in negative Pes, which is an important aspect of the pathophysiology of OSAHS. Assessment of OSAHS based on AHI alone may therefore underestimate the risk of increased negative Pes in cases with reduced AHI.
    Sleep research online: SRO 01/2000; 3(4):169-72.