Ph.D. Åke Svensson M.D

Lund University, Lund, Skane, Sweden

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Publications (1)1.04 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT:   Psoriasis is a common, chronic disease and in one-third of the patients it begins during the first 2 decades of life. The burdens of psoriasis are many, and some can be assessed with quality of life questionnaires. The aim was to investigate the impact of childhood psoriasis on quality of life in children and their parents and to correlate certain clinical findings with quality of life. Forty-five Swedish children (4–16 years, 28 girls) with psoriasis, and their parents, were investigated with the validated questionnaires Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index (5–16 years, n = 42), The Infant’s Dermatitis Quality of Life Index (4 years, n = 3), and Dermatitis Family Impact (n = 45), the two latter with the word eczema replaced by psoriasis. Clinical examination was performed, and psoriasis severity was scored with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. Chronic plaque psoriasis was the most common clinical type (87%). Four of the children had joint complaints. Ninety-three percent had pruritus the preceding 3 days. Ninety-three percent were receiving treatment. Median Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score was 3.3 (range 0.5–12.3). Median score for the Infant’s Dermatitis Quality of Life Index was 4.0 (range 2–12), for Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index 4.0 (0–24), and for Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire 4.0 (0–25). No significant gender difference existed. The Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index scores were higher for younger (5–8 yrs) than older (9–16 yrs) children and higher for those with joint complaints. The Dermatitis family impact scores correlated significantly with Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index and Psoriasis Area and Severity Index scores, but the Children’s Dermatology Life Quality Index did not correlate with Psoriasis Area and Severity Index. The Visual Analog Scale and quality of life scores were significantly correlated. Psoriasis in children affects quality of life in the subjects and their parents. Joint complaints and pruritus significantly impair quality of life.
    Pediatric Dermatology 07/2011; 28(4):375 - 379. · 1.04 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2 Citations
73 Views
1.04 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2011
    • Lund University
      • Department of Dermatology and Venerology
      Lund, Skane, Sweden