Yvonne Bauer

Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany

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Publications (5)9.94 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of Lyme disease by analysis of T cell immune responses in vitro is curtailed by poor correlation between test results and status of infection. This is probably due to the inherent nonspecific activation potential of the causative agent, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, for bystander lymphocytes, in particular via their outer surface lipoproteins. We have now applied a novel protocol to determine specific T cell responses in Lyme disease patients and exclude unrelated cellular responses in vitro. Non-lipidated spirochetal antigens (OspA, OspC and P39) including those selectively expressed in the mammalian host (pG and BapA) were used for antigenic stimulation and autologous dendritic cells served as antigen-presenting cells. The majority of patients with well-defined early and late manifestations of Lyme disease exhibited specific T cell proliferative responses to one or more of the indicated antigens, however at distinct levels. Most notably, among the five antigens tested, pG was specifically recognized by the majority of T cell populations (>70%) - mainly Th1 cells - from patients but not control individuals. These data indicate a causal relationship between B. burgdorferi infection and T cell reactivity to pG, thus making this protein a promising additional diagnostic marker for Lyme disease.
    European Journal of Immunology 04/2001; 31(3):767-76. · 4.97 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Diagnosis of Lyme disease by analysis of T cell immune responses in vitro is curtailed by poor correlation between test results and status of infection. This is probably due to the inherent nonspecific activation potential of the causative agent, the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi, for bystander lymphocytes, in particular via their outer surface lipoproteins. We have now applied a novel protocol to determine specific T cell responses in Lyme disease patients and exclude unrelated cellular responses in vitro. Non-lipidated spirochetal antigens (OspA, OspC and P39) including those selectively expressed in the mammalian host (pG and BapA) were used for antigenic stimulation and autologous dendritic cells served as antigen-presenting cells. The majority of patients with well-defined early and late manifestations of Lyme disease exhibited specific T cell proliferative responses to one or more of the indicated antigens, however at distinct levels. Most notably, among the five antigens tested, pG was specifically recognized by the majority of T cell populations (>70%) – mainly Th1 cells – from patients but not control individuals. These data indicate a causal relationship between B. burgdorferi infection and T cell reactivity to pG, thus making this protein a promising additional diagnostic marker for Lyme disease.
    European Journal of Immunology 02/2001; 31(3):767 - 776. · 4.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Research of recent years on Lyme disease has greatly increased our understanding on antigenic structures and genotypic variability of the aetiological agent, Borrelia (B.) burgdorferi sensu lato, as well as on mechanisms underlying host-parasite interactions and induction/mode of action of protective immune responses. A vaccine formula on the basis of the outer surface lipoprotein A (OspA), previously developed in our laboratory, has successfully been tested in a clinical trial involving nearly 10,000 subjects in the USA. The OspA vaccine is unique in that it protects the mammalian host from infection by eliminating spirochaetes from the vector, but does not cure an established disease. This is because spirochaetes express OspA exclusively in the tick, but not when transmitted into the vertebrate host. For Europe, a more complex vaccine formula is required in order to achieve full protection. This is due to the higher degree of heterogeneity of OspA molecules among isolates of B. burgdorferi in Europe and the inability of the monovalent vaccine to convey complete cross-protection.
    Zentralblatt für Bakteriologie: international journal of medical microbiology 01/2000; 289(5-7):690-5.
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Dendritic cells (DC) are specialized for the primary activation of helper and cytotoxic T cells and have therefore been denominated ‘professional’ antigen-presenting cells. Their potent antigen-presenting capacity qualifies these cells as a promising tool in vaccination protocols, in particular in the induction of tumor-specific immunity. Functionally active DC can be generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. Consequently, these cells gained interest in the field of transfusion medicine. Material and Methods: Here we describe a simplified protocol for the generation of large numbers of DC from peripheral blood monocytes and their phenotype and function. DC were generated from CD14+ monocytes by culture in the presence of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Results: On day 7 of culture the expression of the surface markers CD1a, CD80 and HLA-DR was upregulated, whereas CD14 and CD64 were almost completely downregulated, compared to day 0. Moreover, the in vitro generated DC were shown to induce antigen-specific proliferation of autologous T cells after pulsing with tetanus toxoid. Conclusion: The presented protocol allows to generate large numbers of DC for immunotherapy and vaccination.
    Infusionstherapie Und Transfusionsmedizin - INFUSIONSTHERAPIE. 01/1999; 26(2):115-118.
  • Zentralblatt Fur Bakteriologie-international Journal of Medical Microbiology Virology Parasitology and Infectious Diseases - ZBL BAKT-INT J MED MICROBIOL. 01/1999; 289(5):674-674.

Publication Stats

12 Citations
9.94 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999–2001
    • Universität Heidelberg
      • Institute of Immunology and Serology
      Heidelberg, Baden-Wuerttemberg, Germany
  • 2000
    • Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics
      Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany