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Publications (6)38.83 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Infusion of donor antiviral T cells can provide protective immunity for recipients of hemopoietic progenitor cell transplants, but may cause graft-vs-host disease (GVHD). Current methods of separating antiviral T cells from the alloreactive T cells that produce GVHD are neither routine nor rapid. In a model of lethal murine CMV (MCMV) infection following MHC-mismatched bone marrow transplantation, infusion of MCMV-immune donor lymphocytes pretreated with the DNA cross-linking compound amotosalen prevented MCMV lethality without producing GVHD. Although 95% of mice receiving 30 x 10(6) pretreated donor lymphocytes survived beyond day +100 without MCMV disease or GVHD, all mice receiving equivalent numbers of untreated lymphocytes rapidly died of GVHD. In vitro, amotosalen blocked T cell proliferation without suppressing MCMV peptide-induced IFN-gamma production by MCMV-primed CD8(+) T cells. In vivo, pretreated lymphocytes reduced hepatic MCMV load by 4-log(10) and promoted full hemopoietic chimerism. Amotosalen-treated, MCMV tetramer-positive memory (CD44(high)) CD8(+) T cells persisted to day +100 following infusion, and expressed IFN-gamma when presented with viral peptide. Pretreated T cells were effective at preventing MCMV lethality over a wide range of concentrations. Thus, amotosalen treatment rapidly eliminates the GVHD activity of polyclonal T cells, while preserving long-term antiviral and graft facilitation effects, and may be clinically useful for routine adoptive immunotherapy.
    The Journal of Immunology 01/2004; 171(11):6023-31. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Allogeneic donor T cells in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can contribute to beneficial graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects but can also cause detrimental graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). A successful method for the ex vivo treatment of donor T cells to limit their GVHD potential while retaining GVL activity would have broad clinical applications for patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for malignant diseases. We hypothesized that donor lymphocyte infusions treated with fludarabine, an immunosuppressive nucleoside analog, would have reduced GVHD potential in a fully major histocompatibility complex-mismatched C57BL/6 --> B10.BR mouse BMT model. Recipients of fludarabine-treated donor lymphocyte infusions (F-DLI) had significantly reduced GVHD mortality, reduced histopathologic evidence of GVHD, and lower inflammatory serum cytokine levels than recipients of untreated DLI. Combined comparisons of GVHD incidence and donor-derived hematopoietic chimerism indicated that F-DLI had a therapeutic index superior to that of untreated DLI. Furthermore, adoptive immunotherapy of lymphoblastic lymphoma using F-DLI in the C57BL/6 --> B10.BR model demonstrated a broad therapeutic index with markedly reduced GVHD activity and preservation of GVL activity compared with untreated allogeneic T cells. Fludarabine exposure markedly reduced the CD4+CD44(low)-naive donor T-cell population within 48 hours of transplantation and altered the relative representation of cytokine-producing CD4+ T cells, consistent with T-helper type 2 polarization. However, proliferation of fludarabine-treated T cells in allogeneic recipient spleens was equivalent to that of untreated T cells. The results suggest that fludarabine reduces the GVHD potential of donor lymphocytes through effects on a CD4+CD44(low) T-cell population, with less effect on alloreactive T cells and CD4+CD44(high) memory T cells that are able to mediate GVL effects. Thus, F-DLI represents a novel method of immune modulation that may be useful to enhance immune reconstitution among allograft recipients with reduced risk of GVHD while retaining beneficial GVL effects.
    Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation 10/2003; 9(10):616-32. · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mixed hemopoietic chimerism has the potential to correct genetic hemological diseases (sickle cell anemia, thalassemia) and eliminate chronic immunosuppressive therapy following organ transplantation. To date, most strategies require either recipient conditioning (gamma-irradiation, depletion of the peripheral immune system) or administration of "mega" doses of bone marrow to facilitate reliable engraftment. Although encouraging, many issues remain that may restrict or prevent clinical application of such strategies. We describe an alternative, nonirradiation based strategy using a single dose of busulfan, costimulation blockade, and T cell-depleted donor bone marrow, which promotes titratable macrochimerism and a reshaping of the T cell repertoire. Chimeras exhibit robust donor-specific tolerance, evidenced by acceptance of fully allogeneic skin grafts and failure to generate donor-specific proliferative responses in an in vivo graft-versus-host disease model of alloreactivity. In this model, donor cell infusion and costimulation blockade without busulfan were insufficient for tolerance induction as donor-specific IFN-gamma-producing T cells re-emerged and skin grafts were rejected at approximately 100 days. When applied to a murine beta-thalassemia model, this approach allows for the normalization of hemologic parameters and replacement of the diseased red cell compartment. Such a protocol may allow for clinical application of mixed chimerism strategies in patients with end-stage organ disease or hemoglobinopathies.
    The Journal of Immunology 08/2001; 167(2):1103-11. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Mixed hemopoietic chimerism has the potential to correct genetic hemological diseases (sickle cell anemia, thalassemia) and eliminate chronic immunosuppressive therapy following organ transplantation. To date, most strategies require either recipient conditioning (g-irradiation, depletion of the peripheral immune system) or administration of "mega" doses of bone marrow to facilitate reliable engraftment. Although encouraging, many issues remain that may restrict or prevent clinical application of such strategies. We describe an alternative, nonirradiation based strategy using a single dose of busulfan, costimulation blockade, and T cell-depleted donor bone marrow, which promotes titratable macrochimerism and a reshaping of the T cell repertoire. Chimeras exhibit robust donor-specific tolerance, evidenced by acceptance of fully allogeneic skin grafts and failure to generate donor- specific proliferative responses in an in vivo graft-versus-host disease model of alloreactivity. In this model, donor cell infusion and costimulation blockade without busulfan were insufficient for tolerance induction as donor-specific IFN- g-producing T cells re-emerged and skin grafts were rejected at ;100 days. When applied to a murine b-thalassemia model, this approach allows for the normalization of hemologic parameters and replacement of the diseased red cell compartment. Such a protocol may allow for clinical application of mixed chimerism strategies in patients with end-stage organ disease or hemoglobinopathies. The Journal of Immunology, 2001, 167: 1103-1111.
    The Journal of Immunology 07/2001; 167(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Graft rejection in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can occur when donor and recipient are mismatched at one or more major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci. Donor T cells can prevent graft rejection, but may cause fatal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We tested whether irradiation of allogeneic donor lymphocytes would preserve their graft-facilitating activity while inhibiting their potential for GVHD. Infusions of irradiated allogeneic T cells did not cause GVHD in MHC-mismatched SJL --> (SJL x C57BL6) F1, C57BL6 --> B10.RIII, and C57BL6 --> B10.BR mouse donor --> recipient BMT pairs. The 60-day survival among MHC-mismatched transplant recipients increased from 2% (BM alone) to up to 75% among recipients of BM plus irradiated allogeneic splenocytes. Optimal results were obtained using 50 x 10(6) to 75 x 10(6) irradiated donor splenocytes administered in multiple injections from day -1 to day +1. Recipients of an equal number of nonirradiated MHC-mismatched donor splenocytes uniformly died of acute GVHD. The graft facilitating activity of the irradiated allogeneic splenocytes was mediated by donor T cells. Irradiation to 7.5 Gy increased nuclear NFkappaB in T cells and their allospecific cytotoxicity. Irradiated T cells survived up to 3 days in the BM of MHC-mismatched recipients without proliferation. Recipients of irradiated allogeneic splenocytes and allogeneic BM had stable donor-derived hematopoiesis without a significant representation of donor splenocytes in the T-cell compartment. Irradiated allogeneic T cells thus represent a form of cellular immunotherapy with time-limited biologic activity in vivo that can facilitate allogeneic BMT without causing GVHD.
    Blood 11/1999; 94(9):3222-33. · 9.78 Impact Factor
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    Z Fazili, W Sun, S Mittelstaedt, C Cohen, X X Xu
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    ABSTRACT: Disabled-2 (Dab2) functions in mitogenic signal transduction pathway, and is frequently activated by homozygous gene deletion in tumors, suggesting that Dab2 is a candidate tumor suppressor. Here, we surveyed the expression of Dab2, and report that Dab2 is expressed in a variety of tissues, and the level of expression is particularly high in ovary and breast. Dab2 expression was also detected in immortalized breast and ovarian epithelial cells. However, in more than a dozen established tumor cell lines derived from breast and ovarian epithelial tumors examined by Western blotting, Dab2 expression was undetectable in 90% of these cell lines. Histological staining of human ovarian tissues with specific anti-Dab2 antibodies indicated that Dab2 is highly expressed in the surface epithelial layer. In an immunohistological study of 26 ovarian carcinomas, 22 (85%) of the tumors were found to lose the expression of Dab2 in the tumor cells, which are epithelial origin. Loss of Dab2 expression is not correlated with tumor grade, suggesting that Dab2 is lost in an early stage of tumorigenicity. Indeed, loss of Dab2 correlates closely with morphological transformation of the surface epithelial cells. Additionally, loss of Dab2 protein occurs in hyperproliferative, but histological benign ovarian epithelium, suggesting that loss of Dab2 occurs in pre-malignant lesions. Thus, this study indicates that the loss of Dab2 expression is correlated with tumorigenicity of the cells disregarding the grade of the tumors, and loss of Dab2 expression is an early event in ovarian malignancies.
    Oncogene 06/1999; 18(20):3104-13. · 8.56 Impact Factor