Jin Cui

Nanjing Agricultural University, Nan-ching, Jiangsu Sheng, China

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Publications (11)29.54 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: To understand how light quality influences plant photosynthesis, we investigated chloroplastic ultrastructure, chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters, Rubisco and chlorophyll content and photosynthesis-related genes expression in cucumber seedlings exposed to different light qualities: white, red, blue, yellow and green lights with the same photosynthetic photon flux density of 100 μmol m−2 s−1. The results revealed that plant growth, CO2 assimilation rate and chlorophyll content were significantly reduced in the seedlings grown under red, blue, yellow and green lights as compared with those grown under white light, but each monochromatic light played its special role in regulating plant morphogenesis and photosynthesis. Seedling leaves were thickened and slightly curled; Rubisco biosynthesis, expression of the rca, rbcS and rbcL, the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and quantum yield of PSII electron transport (ФPSII) were all increased in seedlings grown under blue light as compared with those grown under white light. Furthermore, the photosynthetic rate of seedlings grown under blue light was significantly increased, and leaf number and chlorophyll content of seedlings grown under red light were increased as compared with those exposed to other monochromatic lights. On the contrary, the seedlings grown under yellow and green lights were dwarf with the new leaves etiolated. Moreover, photosynthesis, Rubisco biosynthesis and relative gene expression were greatly decreased in seedlings grown under yellow and green light, but chloroplast structural features were less influenced. Interestingly, the Fv/Fm, ФPSII value and chlorophyll content of the seedlings grown under green light were much higher than those grown under yellow light.
    Plant Growth Regulation 07/2014; 73(3). · 1.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aims of the study were to investigate whether hydrogen gas (H2) was involved in regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis in two contrasting radish (Raphanus sativus L.) varieties (low [LA] and high [HA] level of anthocyanin) under UV irradiation. The results showed that hydrogen-rich water (HRW) significantly blocked the UV-A-induced increase of H2O2 and O2•- accumulation, and enhanced the UV-A-induced increase of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities in LA and HA. Furthermore, UV-A-induced increase of anthocyanin and total phenols were further enhanced only in HA sprouts co-treated with HRW. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that five anthocyanidins existed in HA sprouts, but only two in LA sprouts. Meanwhile, the cyanidin was the most abundant anthocyanidin in HA, and the cyanidin was 2-fold higher co-treated with HRW than UV-A. Molecular analyses showed that the anthocyanin biosynthesis-related genes were up-regulated significantly in both HA (in particular) and LA sprouts treated with HRW plus UV-A. These data imply that HRW reestablishes reactive oxygen species homeostasis in both LA and HA, but exerts different effects on anthocyanin accumulation between them under UV-A.
    Journal of agricultural and food chemistry. 06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient required for plant growth and development. However, excess Cu can inactivate and disturb protein structure as a result of unavoidable binding to proteins. To understand better the mechanisms involved in Cu toxicity and tolerance in plants, we developed a new immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) method for the separation and isolation of Cu-binding proteins extracted from roots of rice seedling exposed to excess Cu. In our method, IDA-Sepharose or EDDS-Sepharose column (referred as pre-chromatography) and Cu-IDA-Sepharose column (referred as Cu-IMAC) were connected in tandem. Namely, protein samples were pre-chromatographed with IDA-Sepharose column to removal metal ions, then protein solution was flowed into Cu-IMAC column for enriching Cu-binding proteins in vitro. Compared with the control (Cu-IMAC without any pre-chromatography), IDA-Sepharose pre-chromatography method markedly increased yield of the Cu-IMAC-binding proteins, and number of protein spots and the abundance of 40 protein spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels. Thirteen protein spots randomly selected from 2-DE gel and 11 proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. These putative Cu-binding proteins included those involved in antioxidant defense, carbohydrate metabolism, nucleic acid metabolism, protein folding and stabilization, protein transport and cell wall synthesis. Ten proteins contained one or more of nine putative metal-binding motifs reported by Smith et al. (J Proteome Res 3:834-840, 2004) and seven proteins contained one or two of top six motifs reported by Kung et al. (Proteomics 6:2746-2758, 2006). Results demonstrated that more proteins specifically bound with Cu-IMAC could be enriched through removal of metal ions from samples by IDA-Sepharose pre-chromatography. Further studies are needed on metal-binding characteristics of these proteins in vivo and the relationship between Cu ions and protein biological activities to fully understand the mechanisms of Cu tolerance and toxicity in plants.
    Biology of Metals 02/2014; · 3.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Up-regulation of the gene that encodes intracellular heme oxygenase 1 (HO1) benefits plants under cadmium (Cd(2+)) stress, however the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we elucidate the role of Arabidopsis HY1 (AtHO1) in Cd(2+) tolerance by using genetic and molecular approaches. Analysis of two HY1 null mutants, three HY1 over-expression lines, HO double or triple mutants, as well as phyA and phyB mutants revealed the specific hypersensitivity of hy1 to Cd(2+) stress. Supplementation with two enzymatic by-products of HY1, carbon monoxide (CO) and iron (Fe, especially), rescued the Cd(2+)-induced inhibition of primary root (PR) elongation in hy1-100. The mutation of HY1, which exhibited lower glutathione content than Col-0 in root tissues, was able to induce nitric oxide (NO) overproduction, Cd(2+) accumulation, and severe Fe deficiency in root tissues. However, the contrasting responses appeared in 35S:HY1-4. Additionally, reduced levels of Ferric Reduction Oxidase 2 (FRO2) and Iron-Regulated Transporter 1 (IRT1) transcripts, and increased levels of Heavy Metal ATPase 2/4 (HMA2/4) transcripts bolster the notion that HY1 up-regulation ameliorates Fe deficiency, and might increase Cd(2+) exclusion. Taken together, these results showed that HY1 plays a common link in Cd(2+) tolerance by decreasing NO production and improving Fe homeostasis in Arabidopsis root tissues.
    Molecular Plant 08/2013; · 6.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To study possible cadmium (Cd) resistance mechanisms in cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.), several parameters of metal uptake, distribution, and complexation were compared between two varieties Chunfeng [CF (Cd-tolerant)] and Lvfeng [LF (Cd-sensitive)]. Results showed that CF contained significantly lower Cd concentrations in leaves and higher Cd concentrations in roots than LF. Approximately 70 to 74 % and 66 to 68 % of Cd taken up by LF and CF, respectively, was transported to shoots. More Cd was bound to the cell walls of leaves, stems, and roots in CF than in LF. The higher capacity of CF to limit Cd uptake into shoots could be explained by immobilization of Cd in root cell walls. Compared with control groups, Cd treatment also significantly increased concentrations of nonprotein thiols, phytochelatins (PCs), and citric acid in the leaves and roots of the two varieties; the increases were more pronounced in CF than in LF. Taken together, the results suggest that the greater Cd resistance in CF than in LF may be attributable to the greater capacity of CF to limit Cd uptake into shoots and complex Cd in cell walls and metal binding ligands, such as PCs and citric acid. However, the contributions of PCs and citric acid to Cd detoxification might be smaller than those in cell walls.
    Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 10/2012; · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the functional roles of metallothionein (MT) in copper tolerance, we generated transgenic tobacco plants overexpressing EhMT1 from the Cu-accumulator Elsholtzia haichowensis Sun. Overexpression of EhMT1 in tobacco plants imparted increased copper (Cu) tolerance based on seedling dry biomass when compared to wild-type plants. Plants expressing EhMT1 accumulated more Cu in roots, which was mainly attributable to an increase of the soluble fraction. Levels of lipid peroxidation and production of hydrogen peroxide were lower in roots of transgenic tobacco than in wild-type plants. EhMT1 was suggested to bind Cu in the cytoplasm, thereby decreasing activity of free Cu(2+) ions and blocking Cu(2+) from interacting with cytoplasmic components, which in turn decreases the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, our results also indicate that EhMT1-overexpressing tobacco has a more efficient antioxidant system, with improved peroxidase activity to better cope with oxidative stress.
    Journal of hazardous materials 07/2012; 233-234:65-71. · 4.14 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Hemin, a heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inducer, was shown to exert numerous beneficial physiological functions in animals. Our previous study suggests that HO-1/carbon monoxide (CO) acts as a novel downstream signal system in the auxin-induced adventitious rooting. The objective of this study was to test whether nitric oxide (NO) is involved in hemin-induced cucumber adventitious rooting. Applications of hemin or CO aqueous solution to auxin-depleted cucumber explant induced up-regulation of cucumber HO-1 transcripts (CsHO1), NO production, and thereafter adventitious root formation, and some above responses were blocked by the combination treatment with two nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-like enzyme inhibitors N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester hydrochloride and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, a HO-1 specific inhibitor zinc protoporphyrin IX, and a specific NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt. However, these blocking responses were not observed using tungstate, an inhibitor of nitrate reductase, another NO producing enzyme in plants. Furthermore, the guanylate cyclase inhibitors 1H-(1,2,4)-oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one and 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione reduced root development induced by hemin, whereas the cell-permeable cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) derivative 8-Br-cGMP reversed this effect. Together, our results indicated that at least in our experimental conditions, NO might operate downstream of hemin promoting adventitious root formation probably in a cGMP-dependent manner.
    Journal of plant physiology 05/2012; 169(11):1032-9. · 2.50 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Heme oxygenase–1 (HO1) is a stress protein induced by a variety of oxidative challenges. In this study, an NtHO1 gene coding for a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) HO1 was identified. The NtHO1 gene encodes an NtHO1 precursor of 32.1 kDa with a putative N-terminal plastid transit peptide. The three-dimensional structure of NtHO1 was modeled, and it showed a high degree of structural conservation compared with the known animal and bacterial HO1 crystal structures. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that NtHO1 clearly groups with the HO1-like sequences. The recombinant mature NtHO1 protein expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli was active in the conversion of heme to biliverdin IXα. The result of subcellular localization of NtHO1 confirmed the presence of a functional transit peptide and implied that the NtHO1 gene product is at least localized in the chloroplast. Expression analysis showed that NtHO1 was expressed in all tissues tested. Importantly, we found that NtHO1 expression could be induced by osmotic and salinity stresses, cadmium exposure, hydrogen peroxide, and hemin, suggesting that NtHO1 might play an important role in abiotic stress response. These findings regarding NtHO1 will facilitate our knowledge of its roles under various abiotic stress conditions.
    International Journal of Plant Sciences 01/2012; 173(2):113-123. · 1.54 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The effects of aluminum (Al) on root elongation, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) accumulation, antioxidant levels, antioxidant enzymatic activity, and lignin content in the roots of the Al-tolerant rice variety azucena and the Al-sensitive variety IR64 were investigated. Treatment with Al induced a greater decrease in root elongation and a greater increase in H(2)O(2) and lipid peroxidation as determined by the total thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) level in IR64 than in azucena. Azucena had significantly higher levels of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase GSH POD activity compared with IR64. The concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid, and the GSH/GSSG ratio (reduced vs. oxidized glutathione) were also higher in azucena than in IR64 in the presence of Al. The addition of 1 mg/L GSH improved root elongation in both varieties and decreased H(2)O(2) production under Al stress. By contrast, treatment with buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, decreased root elongation in azucena and stimulated H(2)O(2) production in both varieties. Moreover, Al treatment significantly increased the cytoplasmic activity of peroxidase (POD) as well as the levels of POD bound ionically and covalently to cell walls in the Al-sensitive variety. The lignin content was also increased. Treatment with exogenous H(2)O(2) also increased the lignin content and decreased root elongation in IR64. These results suggest that Al induces lignification in the roots of Al-sensitive rice varieties, probably through an increase in H(2)O(2) accumulation.
    Plant Cell Reports 11/2011; 31(4):687-96. · 2.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our previous work showed that in cucumber (Cucumis sativus), auxin rapidly induces heme oxygenase (HO) activity and the product of HO action, carbon monoxide (CO), then triggers the signal transduction events leading to adventitious root formation. In this study, the cucumber HO-1 gene (named as CsHO1) was isolated and sequenced. It contains four exons and three introns and encodes a polypeptide of 291 amino acids. Further results show that CsHO1 shares a high homology with plant HO-1 proteins and codes a 33.3 kDa protein with a 65-amino transit peptide, predicting a mature protein of 26.1 kDa. The mature CsHO1 was expressed in Escherichia coli to produce a fusion protein, which exhibits HO activity. The CsHO1:GFP fusion protein was localized in the chloroplast. Related biochemical analyses of mature CsHO1, including Vmax, Km, Topt and pHopt, were also investigated. CsHO1 mRNA was found in germinating seeds, roots, stem, and especially in leaf tissues. Several well-known adventitious root inducers, including auxin, ABA, hemin, nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP), CaCl(2), and sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), differentially up-regulate CsHO1 transcripts and corresponding protein levels. These results suggest that CsHO1 may be involved in cucumber adventitious rooting.
    Gene 10/2011; 486(1-2):47-55. · 2.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims Copper (Cu) is an essential micronutrient required for growth and development of plants. However, excess Cu is toxic to plants. To understand the mechanisms involved in copper stress response, a proteomic approach was used to investigate the differences in Cu stress-induced protein expression between a Cu-tolerant variety (B1139) and a Cu-sensitive one (B1195) of rice. Methods Rice seedlings were exposed to 8 μM Cu for 3 days, with plants grown in the normal nutrient solution containing 0.32 μM Cu serving as the control. Proteins were extracted from the roots and separated by two-dimensional PAGE. Thirty four proteins were identified using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Results Thirty-four protein spots were found to be differently expressed in the Cu-stressed roots in at least one variety of rice, including those involved in antioxidative defense, redox regulation, stress response, sulfur and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, signal transduction, and some other proteins with various functions. Nine proteins, including putative cysteine synthase, probable serine acetyltransferase 3, L-ascorbate peroxidase 1, putative glutathione S-transferase 2, and thioredoxin-like 3-3, exhibited a greater increase in response to Cu stress in the Cu-tolerant variety B1139 compared with the Cu–sensitive variety B1195. Conclusion The majority of the proteins showing differential expression in response to Cu exposure are involved in the redox regulation, and sulfur and GSH metabolism, suggesting that these proteins, together with antioxidant enzymes, play an important role in the detoxification of excess Cu and maintaining cellular homeostasis.
    Plant and Soil 366(1-2). · 3.24 Impact Factor