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Publications (3)4.42 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Previous studies reported gender differences for facial emotion recognition in healthy people, with women performing better than men. Few studies that examined gender differences for facial emotion recognition in schizophrenia brought out inconsistent findings. The aim of this study is to investigate gender differences for facial emotion identification and discrimination abilities in patients with schizophrenia. 35 female and 35 male patients with schizophrenia, along with 35 female and 35 male healthy controls were included in the study. All the subjects were evaluated with Facial Emotion Identification Test (FEIT), Facial Emotion Discrimination Test (FEDT), and Benton Facial Recognition Test (BFRT). Patients' psychopathological symptoms were rated by means of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Male patients performed significantly worse than female patients on FEIT total, and negative scores. Male controls performed significantly worse than female controls on FEIT total and negative scores. On all tasks, female patients performed comparable with controls. Male patients performed significantly worse than controls on FEIT, and FEDT. Women with schizophrenia outperformed men for facial emotion recognition ability in a pattern that is similar with the healthy controls. It could be claimed that male patients with schizophrenia need special consideration for emotion perception deficits.
    Psychiatry investigation 03/2013; 10(1):69-74. · 1.06 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Patients with remitted bipolar disorder have cognitive impairments, particularly in executive functions. However, the findings of studies that investigated cognitive functions in unaffected relatives of patients with bipolar disorder are conflicting. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate executive functions in healthy parents of patients with bipolar I disorder, along with bipolar I disorder patients and matched controls. It has been hypothesized that both patients with bipolar I disorder and their parents would have executive function impairments compared with controls. Methods: 25 patients with bipolar I disorder, in full remission, 25 healthy controls that matched the patients with respect to age, gender and education, 50 healthy parents of those patients and 50 healthy controls that matched the parents for age, gender and education were included in the study. All the participants were interviewed with Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-Axis I (SCID-I). Executive functions were assessed using the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT), Trail Making Test (TMT), Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and Stroop Test. Results: Patients performed significantly worse than their matched controls on the VFT, TMT and Stroop tests, but not on the WCST. Parents performed significantly worse than their matched controls on the TMT and Stroop tests, but not on the VFT and WCST. Conclusions: Our results bring more evidence that deficits in ventral, but not dorsal prefrontal executive functions are associated with familial vulnerability to bipolar disorder and ventral prefrontal executive function impairments may represent a potential endophenotype for bipolar disorder.
    Nordic journal of psychiatry 01/2013; · 0.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the executive functions in patients with sporadic schizophrenia (SS) and familial schizophrenia (FS), and the executive functions in their parents. The study included 30 patients with FS and their 37 parents with a positive family history of schizophrenia; 30 patients with SS and their 44 parents; 30 controls matched with the patients for gender, age and education, and 40 controls matched with the parents for gender, age and education (211 subjects in total). All the subjects were interviewed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-Axis I (SCID-I). The executive functions were assessed using the Verbal Fluency Test (VFT), the Trail Making Test (TMT), the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) and the Stroop Test. Patients with FS and their parents, and patients with SS performed significantly worse than their controls on the VFT, TMT, WCST and the Stroop test. There were no statistically significant differences between parents of patients with SS and their controls on any of the tests except for the Stroop color score. FS parents performed significantly worse than SS parents on all tests. FS patients performed significantly worse than SS patients on the VFT, TMT, Stroop test. Previous studies that investigated the cognitive functions of relatives of patients with schizophrenia brought out inconsistent results. The present study investigated relatives with and without a family history of schizophrenia separately and found that executive functions were impaired only in parents with a positive family history of schizophrenia. These findings suggest that impairment in executive functions may represent a genetic endophenotype for schizophrenia.
    Neuropsychobiology 07/2012; 66(2):93-9. · 2.37 Impact Factor