Shahram Jamshidi

University of Tehran, Teheran, Tehrān, Iran

Are you Shahram Jamshidi?

Claim your profile

Publications (17)13.2 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In dogs, the gastric Helicobacter spp. have been well studied, but there is little information regarding the other parts of the alimentary system. The incidence of Helicobacter spp. infection in dogs is largely unknown and to our knowledge there are no data about their potential pathogenic role. In light of these considerations, the aims of this study were (i) to assess the prevalence of Helicobacter spp. in colonic biopsies of healthy and symptomatic stray dogs also (ii) we isolate and characterize helicobacters in canine colonic biopsies to compare the commonly used tests for the identification of Helicobacter spp. and to determine the occurrence of these species in dogs. Tissues from fifteen stray dogs (8 males and 7 females, age 6 months -10 years) were used in this study. From each stray dog, multiple colonic biopsies were taken for PCR. Biopsies for PCR of cecum and colon were immediately frozen and stored at -20[degree sign]C until DNA extraction. Samples for histological examination were fixed in 10% neutral buffered formalin and embedded in paraffin wax. In the cecum and colon, Helicobacter spp. DNA was detected in all dogs. H.canis, H.bizzozeronii, H. bilis, H.felis, H.salomonis and H.pylori Identified by specific polymerase chain reaction. Histopathology demonstrated that Helicobacter organisms were localized within the surface mucus and the intestinal crypts. Dogs with heavy Helicobacter spp. colonization were significantly in younger as well as had a higher level of mucosal fibrosis/atrophy than dogs with uncolonized or poorly colonized biopsies (p < 0.05). We have indicated that the crypts of the cecum and colon of healthy and symptomatic dogs are heavily colonized by Helicobacter spp.. Combined molecular and histological approaches demonstrated that enterohepatic Helicobacter spp. infection is rather common in colonic biopsies of healthy and symptomatic stray dogs, with Helicobacter spp. specialy H. canis, H.bizzozeroni, H.billis, H.felis and H. salomonis identified as the most common species.Virtual Slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1957989294118782.
    Diagnostic Pathology 03/2014; 9(1):50. · 1.85 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter spp. have been detected in different parts of gastrointestinal tract of dogs including the oral cavity, stomach, intestines and recently, hepatobilliary system. However, the transmission pathways of Helicobacter spp. have not been yet fully elucidated. Research in the last decade has proposed that oral–oral and fecal–oral transmissions, among others, may be a plausible route of this gastric infection. This study was carried out primarily to determine the existence of pylori and non-pylori Helicobacter spp. in the oral secretions and dental plaque of stray dogs of Iran as one of the possible routes of humans and animal infection and, secondly, to evaluate the accordance between oral and gastric colonization of Helicobacter spp. in these dogs. Forty-eight adult stray dogs were studied by PCR using 16S rRNA, Helicobacter felis, Helicobacter heilmannii, and Helicobacter pylori specific primers. Positive samples for 16S rRNA specific primers that did not meet the specified species of Helicobacter genus were randomly subjected to sequencing. Helicobacter spp. DNA was found in the oral and gastric specimens of 100 % of the stray dogs. There was not, however, any agreement between Helicobacter colonization at these two locations, at neither genus nor species level. Our study confirmed that the oral cavity of stray dogs routinely exposed to transient forms of bacteria and may temporarily harbor Helicobacter spp and Wolinella spp. Therefore, oral cavity as a source of Helicobacter spp. may act as a reservoir for transmission. However, it may not necessarily reflect the colonization status of the gastric mucosa.
    Comparative Clinical Pathology 01/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This survey was conducted to identify and estimate the frequencies of ectoparasites of dogs in Tehran, Iran. A total of 143 dogs attended at the Small Animal Hospital of the Veterinary School, the University of Tehran, were examined for the presence of ectoparasites and dermatological lesions. Ectoparasite specimens and blood samples were sent to parasitology and hematology laboratories, respectively. Ticks were the most frequent ectoparasite (36.4%, 52/143), followed by fleas (29.4%, 42/143), mites (25.9%, 37/143), and lice (8.4%, 12/143). Mixed infestations with two or more ectoparasites were detected in eight dogs. Rhipicephalus bursa was the most frequent ectoparasite in spring and summer. Ectoparasitic infestations were recorded mainly in large breeds and juvenile animals. Eosinophilia was more observed in dogs infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. The most common clinical sign, skin pruritus, was associated with mite and lice infestations. These results indicate that the tick R. bursa was the most prominent species of ectoparasite found in the evaluated group, followed by Ctenocephalides canis and S. scabiei var canis.
    Revista brasileira de parasitologia veterinaria = Brazilian journal of veterinary parasitology: Orgao Oficial do Colegio Brasileiro de Parasitologia Veterinaria 09/2012; 21(3):326-9. · 0.72 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Recently, Radachlorin has been shown to be a promising photosensitizer in antimicrobial photodynamic therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of adjunctive application of Radachlorin-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) compared to scaling and root planing (SRP) alone on clinical parameters and cytokine levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) of dogs with experimental periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Periodontal disease was induced by placing silk ligatures around both maxillary and mandibular teeth. After establishment of attachment loss, full mouth SRP was performed in all dogs. One day after SRP, each quadrant randomly received one of the following treatment modalities: Radachlorin + diode laser (wavelength: 662 nm, power: 100 mW, continuous mode, time of irradiation: 20s), Radachlorin alone, laser alone, or no adjunctive treatment. The same adjunctive procedure was repeated 1 week later. Clinical parameters including periodontal probing depth (PPD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and bleeding on probing (BOP), as well as crevicular levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were evaluated at baseline, 3 weeks and 3 months after treatment. Results: After 3 weeks and 3 months, all treatment groups showed significant improvement in all clinical and immunologic parameters (all p: <0.001). No significant differences were found between the four groups with regard to the measured parameters (all p >0.05). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, adjunctive use of Radachlorin-mediated aPDT with the current setting has no additional effect on the clinical parameters or pro-inflammatory cytokine levels in ligature-induced periodontitis.
    Journal of Periodontology 07/2012; · 2.40 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Owing to rising drug-resistant Helicobacter species infections in people and animals, currently therapies are losing their efficacy; therefore, regimens efficacious in the presence of drug resistance are needed. This study assessed the efficacy and safety of a 14-day quadruple Helicobacter species therapy in cats with naturally acquired infection. Thirteen asymptomatic adult stray cats with Helicobacter species infection (identified by analysis of gastric biopsies using polymerase chain reaction and Helicobacter-specific primers) received omeprazole 0.7mg/kg q 8h plus amoxicillin 20mg/kg q 12h, metronidazole 20mg/kg q 12h and clarithromycin 7.5mg/kg q 12h, for 14 days. Second molecular analysis of gastric biopsies revealed persistence of Helicobacter species DNA in four cats that were negative on quantitative urease testing, cytology and histopathology. Our results suggest that antibiotic regimens that are effective against Helicobacter pylori in people cannot eradicate Helicobacter species in cats with naturally acquired infection, although transient suppression may occur.
    Journal of feline medicine and surgery. 02/2011; 13(2):88-93.
  • Source
    Samaneh Eidi, Ali Reza Khosravi, Shahram Jamshidi
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Malassezia yeasts are commensal organisms on the skin of warm-blooded vertebrates. Th e lipid-dependent Malassezia species have recently been cultured from veterinary specimens. Th e present study investigated and compared diff erent Malassezia species in the skin and external ear canal of healthy and diseased dogs. Th e sampling in the study was carried out on 152 animals, comprising 90 samples from the diseased group and 62 samples from the healthy group. All of the samples were determined by cytological examination and fungal culture. Th e isolated yeasts were identifi ed by their morphological features as well as their physiological characteristics. Th e culture results were positive in only 32.2% samples, including 75.5% samples from the diseased group, and 24.5% samples from the healthy group. A total of 75 strains from 6 Malassezia species isolated from both groups were detected with a frequency rate as follows: M. pachydermatis (56%), M. sympodialis (28%), M. furfur (8%), M. obtusa (5.4%), M. globosa (1.3%), and M. restricta (1.3%). Th e present work confi rms both the presence of M. pachydermatis as the most prevalent species in both groups, and the presence of some lipid-dependent species of Malassezia.
    J. Vet. Anim. Sci. 01/2011; 35:345-350.
  • Source
    S Eidi, A R Khosravi, Shahram Jamshidi, M Soltani
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The lipophilic yeasts of the genus Malassezia are opportunistic microorganisms of the skin microflora, but they can be agents of various dermatomycoses. In this study, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR technique was applied to the genetic typing of Malassezia species isolated from dog with otitis and seborrhoeic dermatitis and healthy dog. The analysis of electrophoretic profiles on 1/5% agarose gel showed a total 890 clearly amplified PCR band in 176 different positions. The phenogram constructed from the pairwise similarity among all Malassezia isolates demonstrated that the tested isolates of Malassezia are grouped into 22 distinct groups. This study was able to assess some DNA polymorphism of different Malassezia isolates in dogs. The detection of these differences between the RAPD band patterns from dogs observed could facilitate the monitoring of spread and pathogenicity of Malassezia infections in these animals.
    World Journal of Zoology. 01/2011; 6:134-141.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bacterial agents are considered important pathogens causing external otitis in dogs. It is essential to carry out bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test in the case of otitis externa, particularly for chronic or recurring cases. Sterile swab samples were obtained from terminal part of vertical ear canals of 74 dogs with otitis externa for cytology, bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test. Cytologic smears were stained using Gram and Giemsa staining methods. Aerobic bacterial culture performed on blood agar and MacConkey agar. Among total number of 92 isolated bacteria, 68 were Staphylococcus intermedius. Other isolated bacteria included: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Pasteurella canis, and six other species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus. Antimicrobial susceptibility test were performed for all isolated bacteria using 14 antibiotics. Based on the results of this study, all isolated Staphylococcus spp. were sensitive to amikacin, enrofloxacin, and rifampin, and had low resistance to gentamicin, cephalothin and ceftriaxone. More than half of gram-positive isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin. Generally, all isolated gram-negative bacteria, were sensitive to amikacin and enrofloxacin, and had low resistance to ceftriaxone and gentamicin. They were highly resistant to penicillin, eythromycin, and cephalothin. Regarding the results of this study, in cases of uncomplicated otitis externa, it is possible to select antimicrobial drugs merely based on cytology, but it is recommended to perform bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test. However, in complicated or refractory cases, antimicrobials should be selected based on bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility test.
    Veterinary Research Communications 06/2010; 34(5):435-44. · 1.08 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The yeasts of the Malassezia genus are opportunistic microorganisms in the skin and auricular canal of human and animals, mainly cats, and can cause otitis externa and dermatitis disorders. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of different species of Malassezia in the external ear canal of cats with and without otitis externa. Thirty-one normal cats and 82 animals with otitis externa were clinically examined. Sterile cotton swabs were used to collect specimens from the external ear canal and streaked onto the surface of Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA) and modified Dixon agar. Malassezia yeasts were isolated from 95.1% and 48.4% of the cats with and without otitis externa, respectively. The rate of isolation in affected animals versus normals was highly significant (P<0.05). Out of the 137 isolates obtained from cats with otitis, 57.7% were identified as M. pachydermatis (with significant frequency; P<0.05), 15.4% as M. obtusa, 11.4% as M. globosa, 7.3% as M. slooffiae, 4.1% as M. sympodialis, 2.4% as M. furfur and 1.6% as M. restricta. Malassezia species were frequently isolated from subjects with age range from 1 to 4 years old (42.7%). Our finding of Malassezia isolates indicated that feline otitis externa can be associated with lipid-dependent Malassezia species in addition to the non lipid- dependent species M. pachydermatis.
    Journal of Veterinary Medical Science 12/2009; 72(3):293-6. · 0.88 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Clinically infected dogs have been identified as the main reservoir hosts of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania infantum in the Mediterranean region. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of asymptomatic infected dogs compared with symptomatic ones as a source of L. infantum infection to golden hamster. For this purpose, anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected with direct agglutination test (DAT) in 13 symptomatic (7 seropositive =>or=1:320) and 53 asymptomatic (9 seropositive =>or=1:320 and 44 seronegative =<1:320) ownership dogs. DNA of Leishmania sp. was extracted from skin and peripheral blood tissues of each dog and tested by PCR. Sixty-six Syrian golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) were used for the determination of infectivity and pathogenicity of L. infantum, isolated from the dogs. We used the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS 2) rDNA sequence analysis. The results showed that 22 and 11 out of 66 inoculated golden hamsters were positive by PCR and parasitological examinations, respectively. From 22 PCR positive hamsters, 17 were related to asymptomatic dogs and 5 were from symptomatic ones. There was no significant difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs in producing Leishmania infection in the susceptible animal model (P=0.66). Smears and cultures of 5 dogs from 13 symptomatic dogs (38.5%) and 6 dogs from 53 asymptomatic ones (11.3%) were found to be positive at parasitological examination. All the L. infantum isolates from symptomatic and asymptomatic dogs were similar in sequencing. In conclusion, asymptomatic infected dogs as well as symptomatic ones can harbor L. infantum in their blood and skins which are virulent and infectious for inoculated golden hamster.
    Acta tropica 07/2009; 112(2):101-5. · 2.79 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of chronic gastritis in pet dogs, to determine the histopathologic changes of gastric mucosa and, to determine its relationship with canine gastric Helicobacter infection. Sixty percent (n = 18), 27% (n = 8) and 13% (n = 4) of the examined stomachs showed normal, congested and erosive gastric mucosa respectively. Histopathologic examination was confirmed the presence of chronic gastritis in 40% of dogs (n = 12). Lymphocytic-plasmacytic gastritis was the most common type of chronic gastritis. Gastric Helicobacter was detected in cytological examination of 26 out of 30 dogs (86.6%) but in the PCR analysis, 93% of gastric samples were positive for GHLO. There was no significant relation between the presence of Helicobacters and chronic gastritis (p>0.05). Follicular gastritis was detected in 12 cases (40%) and there was also no significant correlation between its presence and GHLO's infection (p>0.05). In conclusion, chronic gastritis can be considered as a prevalent disease especially in dogs. Nutritional and environmental factors as well as individual immune response may have role in induction of chronic gastritis, but the clinical significance of these histopathologic changes should be evaluated.
    Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences 07/2008; 11(11):1443-8.
  • JOURNAL OF VETERINARY RESEARCH. 01/2007; 62(3):131-136.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: T. Z. SALEHI: Helicobacter spp. infection and gastric lesions in domestic and stray cats. Vet. arhiv 76, 479-488, 2006. ABSTRACT Gastritis is a common finding in dogs with 35% of the dogs investigated for chronic vomiting and 26% to 48% of asymptomatic dogs affected. However, the true prevalence in cats is yet to be determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis in domestic and stray cats. The total rate was an estimated as 66.6%. Thorough histopathological studies revealed no significant association between the occurrence of chronic gastritis and age and sex in either stray or domestic cats. Gastritis was significantly more prevalent in the antrum than the gastric body and only chronic non-specific gastritis was diagnosed. The most common types of chronic non-specific gastritis were atrophic (26.3%), lympho-plasmacytic (24.6%) and hypertrophic (15.8%), respectively. In chronic gastritis cases, fibrosis and lymphoid follicles were seen in 42.1% and 31.6% of the subjects respectively, but no significant associations were observed between the type of non-specific chronic gastritis, fibrosis and occurrence of lymphoid follicles. The prevalence of gastric erosion and ulcers in cats was 19.2% and 3.5%, respectively, and there was no significant association between chronic gastritis occurrence and gastric ulceration or erosions. Cytological examination revealed GHLO colonization in 63.15% of the antrum and 77.19% of the gastric body, with no correlation with non-specific chronic gastritis in the studied subjects.
    01/2006; 76:479-488.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Gastritis is a common finding in dogs with 35% of the dogs investigated for chronic vomiting and 26% to 48% of asymptomatic dogs affected. However, the true prevalence in cats is yet to be determined. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of chronic gastritis in domestic and stray cats. The total rate was an estimated as 66.6%. Thorough histopathological studies revealed no significant association between the occurrence of chronic gastritis and age and sex in either stray or domestic cats. Gastritis was significantly more prevalent in the antrum than the gastric body and only chronic non-specific gastritis was diagnosed. The most common types of chronic non-specific gastritis were atrophic (26.3%), lympho-plasmacytic (24.6%) and hypertrophic (15.8%), respectively. In chronic gastritis cases, fibrosis and lymphoid follicles were seen in 42.1% and 31.6% of the subjects respectively, but no significant associations were observed between the type of non-specific chronic gastritis, fibrosis and occurrence of lymphoid follicles. The prevalence of gastric erosion and ulcers in cats was 19.2% and 3.5%, respectively, and there was no significant association between chronic gastritis occurrence and gastric ulceration or erosions. Cytological examination revealed GHLO colonization in 63.15% of the antrum and 77.19% of the gastric body, with no correlation with non-specific chronic gastritis in the studied subjects.
    Veterinary Archives (veterinarski.arhiv@vef.hr); Vol.76 No.6. 01/2006;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Leishmania infantum is known to be associated with visceral leishmaniasis in Iran and canids are natural reservoirs. Control of disease in dogs appears to be one of the most effective approaches for interrupting the domestic cycle of the disease. In search for successful vaccine strategies, we evaluated the cysteine proteinases (CPs) type I and II using a heterologous prime-boost regime for vaccination against experimental visceral leishmaniasis in dogs. Following vaccination and challenge, dogs were followed for 12 months. Ten dogs vaccinated by prime/boost with DNA/recombinant CPs (in combination with CpG ODN and Montanide 720) remained free of infection in their bone morrow. In contrast, three out of four dogs in the control groups had infection in their bone marrow. The peripheral lymphocytes from protected animals had generally higher proliferation responses to F/T antigen, recombinant CPA (rCPA) and recombinant CPB (rCPB) than controls. During post-challenge period, the difference in stimulation index is significant (p<0.05) on months 11 and 12 to F/T antigens, all months for rCPA and 5, 7, 9, 11 and 12 months for rCPB. Analysis of cytokine mRNA level suggested that vaccinated dogs had elevated IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), whereas there was a consistent increase in the level of IL-10 in the control groups and some vaccinated dogs. The level of total IgG and IgG2, but not IgG1, to rCPA and rCPB was significantly higher in the vaccinated group (p<0.05) than the control groups. We also showed that with the exception of one dog, all dogs in the vaccinated group in comparison to control dogs had strong DTH responses. We propose that the combination of DNA and recombinant protein vaccination using CPs could be instrumental to control (VL) in dogs.
    Vaccine 06/2005; 23(28):3716-25. · 3.49 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Piroplasmosis is a zoonotic protozoan disease transmitted by ticks. The full geographical range of canine piroplasms has been found in dogs in the Middle East, parts of Africa, North America, and Europe. Following our studies on molecular detection of piroplasmosis in the south of Iran, we found Theileria annulata in two herd dogs, as well as information on their 18S rRNA gene sequences. Piroplasmosis agents were detected by PCR of 280 blood samples collected from dogs in seven regions of the Shiraz suburbia in southern Iran, between November 2009 and June 2011. Two positive samples from Shiraz were infected with T. annulata, and one sample was infected with Babesia canis. PCR positive samples were further analyzed by sequence analysis. The results of this study reconfirmed that T. annulata are not always as host specific as accepted. This is the first report of T. annulata in herd dogs in southern Iran and the second report of T. annulata in dogs worldwide.
    Comparative Clinical Pathology 21(3).
  • Samaneh Eidi, Shahram Jamshidi, Ahmad Reza Movassaghi
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An 8-month female shitzu was presented with depression, anorexia, fever, weakness, lethargy, consecutive coughing, sneezing and severe itching of ears. There was otitis externa with corneal ulcer and keratoconjunctivitis. Microscopic examination of impression smears of all samples revealed numerous yeasts typical of Malassezia sp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and additional tests confirmed the identification of Malassezia pachydermatis. Histopathological examination of skin biopsies revealed oval spores in the superficial layer of the affected skin. There were also follicles containing Demodex spp.
    Comparative Clinical Pathology 21(3).