C.-H. Rosie Chen

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, United States

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Publications (38)156 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The H ii complex N 44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides an excellent site to perform a detailed study of star formation in a mild starburst, as it hosts three regions of star formation at different evolutionary stages, and it is not as complicated and confusing as the 30 Doradus giant H ii region. We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope observations and complementary ground-based 4 m uBVIJK observations of N 44 to identify candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs). We further classify the YSOs into Types I, II, and III, according to their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In our sample of 60 YSO candidates, ∼65% of them are resolved into multiple components or extended sources in high-resolution ground-based images. We have modeled the SEDs of 36 YSOs that appear single or dominant within a group. We find good fits for Types I and I/II YSOs, but Types II and II/III YSOs show deviations between their observed SEDs and models that do not include PAH emission. We have also found that some Type III YSOs have central holes in their disk components. YSO counterparts are found in four ultracompact H ii regions and their stellar masses determined from SED model fits agree well with those estimated from the ionization requirements of the H ii regions. The distribution of YSOs is compared with those of the underlying stellar population and interstellar gas conditions to illustrate a correlation between the current formation of O-type stars and previous formation of massive stars. Evidence of triggered star formation is also presented.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2015; 695(1):511-541. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/695/1/511 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Rich in HII regions, giant molecular clouds are natural laboratories to study massive stars and sequential star formation. The Galactic star forming complex W33 is located at l=~12.8deg and at a distance of 2.4 kpc, has a size of ~10 pc and a total mass of (~0.8 - ~8.0) X 10^5 Msun. The integrated radio and IR luminosity of W33 - when combined with the direct detection of methanol masers, the protostellar object W33A, and protocluster embedded within the radio source W33 main - mark the region out as a site of vigorous ongoing star formation. In order to assess the long term star formation history, we performed an infrared spectroscopic search for massive stars, detecting for the first time fourteen early-type stars, including one WN6 star and four O4-7 stars. The distribution of spectral types suggests that this population formed during the last ~2-4 Myr, while the absence of red supergiants precludes extensive star formation at ages 6-30 Myr. This activity appears distributed throughout the region and does not appear to have yielded the dense stellar clusters that characterize other star forming complexes such as Carina and G305. Instead, we anticipate that W33 will eventually evolve into a loose stellar aggregate, with Cyg OB2 serving as a useful, albeit richer and more massive, comparator. Given recent distance estimates, and despite a remarkably similar stellar population, the rich cluster Cl 1813-178 located on the north-west edge of W33 does not appear to be physically associated with W33.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2015; 805(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/805/2/110 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Observations from the HERschel Inventory of the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (HERITAGE) have been used to identify dusty populations of sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC and SMC). We conducted the study using the HERITAGE catalogs of point sources available from the Herschel Science Center from both the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS; 100 and 160 mu m) and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE; 250, 350, and 500 mu m) cameras. These catalogs are matched to each other to create a Herschel band-merged catalog and then further matched to archival Spitzer IRAC and MIPS catalogs from the Spitzer Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution (SAGE) and SAGE-SMC surveys to create single mid- to far-infrared (far-IR) point source catalogs that span the wavelength range from 3.6 to 500 mu m. There are 35,322 unique sources in the LMC and 7503 in the SMC. To be bright in the FIR, a source must be very dusty, and so the sources in the HERITAGE catalogs represent the dustiest populations of sources. The brightest HERITAGE sources are dominated by young stellar objects (YSOs), and the dimmest by background galaxies. We identify the sources most likely to be background galaxies by first considering their morphology (distant galaxies are point-like at the resolution of Herschel) and then comparing the flux distribution to that of the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (ATLAS) survey of galaxies. We find a total of 9745 background galaxy candidates in the LMC HERITAGE images and 5111 in the SMC images, in agreement with the number predicted by extrapolating from the ATLAS flux distribution. The majority of the Magellanic Cloud-residing sources are either very young, embedded forming stars or dusty clumps of the interstellar medium. Using the presence of 24 mu m emission as a tracer of star formation, we identify 3518 YSO candidates in the LMC and 663 in the SMC. There are far fewer far-IR bright YSOs in the SMC than the LMC due to both the SMC's smaller size and its lower dust content. The YSO candidate lists may be contaminated at low flux levels by background galaxies, and so we differentiate between sources with a high ("probable") and moderate ("possible") likelihood of being a YSO. There are 2493/425 probable YSO candidates in the LMC/SMC. Approximately 73% of the Herschel YSO candidates are newly identified in the LMC, and 35% in the SMC. We further identify a small population of dusty objects in the late stages of stellar evolution including extreme and post-asymptotic giant branch, planetary nebulae, and supernova remnants. These populations are identified by matching the HERITAGE catalogs to lists of previously identified objects in the literature. Approximately half of the LMC sources and one quarter of the SMC sources are too faint to obtain accurate ample FIR photometry and are unclassified.
    The Astronomical Journal 12/2014; 148(6). DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/148/6/124 · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Clear identifications of Galactic young stellar clusters farther than a few kpc from the Sun are rare, despite the large number of candidate clusters. We aim to improve the selection of candidate clusters rich in massive stars with a multiwavelength analysis of photometric Galactic data that range from optical to mid-infrared wavelengths. We present a photometric and spectroscopic analysis of five candidate stellar clusters, which were selected as overdensities with bright stars (Ks < 7 mag) in GLIMPSE and 2MASS images. A total of 48 infrared spectra were obtained. The combination of photometry and spectroscopy yielded six new red supergiant stars with masses from 10 Msun to 15 Msun. Two red supergiants are located at Galactic coordinates (l,b)=(16.7deg,-0.63deg) and at a distance of about ~3.9 kpc; four other red supergiants are members of a cluster at Galactic coordinates (l,b)=(49.3deg,+0.72deg) and at a distance of ~7.0 kpc. Spectroscopic analysis of the brightest stars of detected overdensities and studies of interstellar extinction along their line of sights are fundamental to distinguish regions of low extinction from actual stellar clusters. The census of young star clusters containing red supergiants is incomplete; in the existing all-sky near-infrared surveys, they can be identified as overdensities of bright stars with infrared color-magnitude diagrams characterized by gaps.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics 09/2014; DOI:10.1051/0004-6361/201423802 · 4.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Magellanic Bridge is the nearest low-metallicity, tidally stripped environment, offering a unique high-resolution view of physical conditions in merging and forming galaxies. In this paper we present analysis of candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs), i.e., {\it in situ, current} massive star formation (MSF) in the Bridge using {\it Spitzer} mid-IR and complementary optical and near-IR photometry. While we definitely find YSOs in the Bridge, the most massive are $\sim10 M_\odot$, $\ll45 M_\odot$ found in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The intensity of MSF in the Bridge also appears decreasing, as the most massive YSOs are less massive than those formed in the past. To investigate environmental effects on MSF, we have compared properties of massive YSOs in the Bridge to those in the LMC. First, YSOs in the Bridge are apparently less embedded than in the LMC: 81% of Bridge YSOs show optical counterparts, compared to only 56% of LMC sources with the same range of mass, circumstellar dust mass, and line-of-sight extinction. Circumstellar envelopes are evidently more porous or clumpy in the Bridge's low-metallicity environment. Second, we have used whole samples of YSOs in the LMC and the Bridge to estimate the probability of finding YSOs at a given \hi\ column density, N(HI). We found that the LMC has $\sim3\times$ higher probability than the Bridge for N(HI) $>10\times10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$, but the trend reverses at lower N(HI). Investigating whether this lower efficiency relative to HI is due to less efficient molecular cloud formation, or less efficient cloud collapse, or both, will require sensitive molecular gas observations.
    The Astrophysical Journal 03/2014; 785(2). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/785/2/162 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on recent observations of molecular clouds in the tidal Magellanic Bridge; specifically, the ̃kpc-long, tidally extended "tail" of the Small Magellanic Cloud. In particular, we identify an unusually high 12CO(3-2)/12CO(1-0) ratio of 2-3 to 1, toward one of the clouds, suggesting a warm and dense molecular material associated with imminent or current formation of stars. Our ̃ 6 pc-resolution observations show that the target clouds have only a general correlation with bright 24 μm emission regions, occasionally offset by up to ̃ 15 pc. These detections support the scenario that stars are actively being created in this uniquely nearby tidal filament, in the present epoch, and that star formation is ongoing at a range of evolutionary stages or rates.
    Publications- Astronomical Society of Japan 01/2014; 66(1). DOI:10.1093/pasj/pst006 · 2.01 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present ALMA observations of 30 Doradus -- the highest resolution view of molecular gas in an extragalactic star formation region to date (~0.4pc x 0.6pc). The 30Dor-10 cloud north of R136 was mapped in 12CO 2-1, 13CO 2-1, C18O 2-1, 1.3mm continuum, the H30alpha recombination line, and two H2CO 3-2 transitions. Most 12CO emission is associated with small filaments and clumps (<1pc, ~1000 Msun at the current resolution). Some clumps are associated with protostars, including "pillars of creation" photoablated by intense radiation from R136. Emission from molecular clouds is often analyzed by decomposition into approximately beam-sized clumps. Such clumps in 30 Doradus follow similar trends in size, linewidth, and surface density to Milky Way clumps. The 30 Doradus clumps have somewhat larger linewidths for a given size than predicted by Larson's scaling relation, consistent with pressure confinement. They extend to higher surface density at a given size and linewidth compared to clouds studied at 10pc resolution. These trends are also true of clumps in Galactic infrared-dark clouds; higher resolution observations of both environments are required. Consistency of clump masses calculated from dust continuum, CO, and the virial theorem reveals that the CO abundance in 30 Doradus clumps is not significantly different from the LMC mean, but the dust abundance may be reduced by ~2. There are no strong trends in clump properties with distance from R136; dense clumps are not strongly affected by the external radiation field, but there is a modest trend towards lower dense clump filling fraction deeper in the cloud.
    The Astrophysical Journal 07/2013; 774(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/774/1/73 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We survey HII free-free emission around ˜60 spectroscopically confirmed young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 3.3 and 5.5 cm. From each YSOs' infrared spectrum, we: a) quantify how embedded/evolved the YSO is through principle component analysis (PCA) of the silicate absorption (Seale et al. 2009); and b) estimate the mass from SED models (Robitaille et al. 2007). We have four main results: (1) Based on mass estimates from SED models and ATCA detection limits, we find that most massive YSOs are in HII regions regardless of age; (2) Older massive YSOs (as indicated by silicate PCA index) are much more likely to be resolved than younger YSOs, indicating evolving HII regions; (3) Resolved (typically older) sources usually have lower densities. Thus, in our survey we see a transition from ultra-compact HII to HII regions; and (4) We find that accretion about the massive YSO is likely non-spherical, resulting in HII regions in the shape of prolate spheroids.
    Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union 03/2013; 8(S292):56-56. DOI:10.1017/S1743921313000379
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    ABSTRACT: The H II complex N44 in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) provides an excellent site to perform a detailed study of star formation in a mild starburst, as it hosts three regions of star formation at different evolutionary stages and it is not as complicated and confusing as the 30 Doradus giant H II region. We have obtained Spitzer Space Telescope observations and complementary groundbased 4m uBV IJK observations of N44 to identify candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs). We further classify the YSOs into Types I, II, and III, according to their spectral energy distributions (SEDs). In our sample of 60 YSO candidates, ∼ 65 % of them are resolved into multiple components or extended sources in high-resolution ground-based images. We have modeled the SEDs of
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    Wei Sun · Yang Chen · Li Feng · You-Hua Chu · C. -H. Rosie Chen · Q. Daniel Wang · Jiang-Tao Li
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    ABSTRACT: We performed a Chandra X-ray study of three giant H II regions (GHRs), NGC 5461, NGC 5462, and NGC 5471, in the spiral galaxy M101. The X-ray spectra of the three GHRs all contain a prominent thermal component with a temperature of ~0.2 keV. In NGC 5461, the spatial distribution of the soft (< 1.5 keV) X-ray emission is generally in agreement with the extent of H1105, the most luminous H II region therein, but extends beyond its southern boundary, which could be attributed to outflows from the star cloud between H1105 and H1098. In NGC 5462, the X-ray emission is displaced from the H II regions and a ridge of blue stars; the H-alpha filaments extending from the ridge of star cloud to the diffuse X-rays suggest that hot gas outflows have occurred. The X-rays from NGC 5471 are concentrated at the B-knot, a "hypernova remnant" candidate. Assuming a Sedov-Taylor evolution, the derived explosion energy, on the order of 10^52 ergs, is consistent with a hypernova origin. In addition, a bright source in the field of NGC 5462 has been identified as a background AGN, instead of a black hole X-ray binary in M101.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2012; 760(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/760/1/61 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Supernova remnant (SNR) candidates in the giant spiral galaxy M101 have been previously identified from ground-based H-alpha and [SII] images. We have used archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) H-alpha and broad-band images as well as stellar photometry of 55 SNR candidates to examine their physical structure, interstellar environment, and underlying stellar population. We have also obtained high-dispersion echelle spectra to search for shocked high-velocity gas in 18 SNR candidates, and identified X-ray counterparts to SNR candidates using data from archival observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Twenty-one of these 55 SNR candidates studied have X-ray counterparts, although one of them is a known ultra-luminous X-ray source. The multi-wavelength information has been used to assess the nature of each SNR candidate. We find that within this limited sample, ~16% are likely remnants of Type Ia SNe and ~45% are remnants of core-collapse SNe. In addition, about ~36% are large candidates which we suggest are either superbubbles or OB/HII complexes. Existing radio observations are not sensitive enough to detect the non-thermal emission from these SNR candidates. Several radio sources are coincident with X-ray sources, but they are associated with either giant HII regions in M101 or background galaxies. The archival HST H-alpha images do not cover the entire galaxy and thus prevents a complete study of M101. Furthermore, the lack of HST [SII] images precludes searches for small SNR candidates which could not be identified by ground-based observations. Such high-resolution images are needed in order to obtain a complete census of SNRs in M101 for a comprehensive investigation of the distribution, population, and rates of SNe in this galaxy.
    The Astronomical Journal 02/2012; 143(4). DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/143/4/85 · 4.05 Impact Factor
  • Wei Sun · Li Feng · Yang Chen · C.-H. Rosie Chen · You-Hua Chu
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    ABSTRACT: The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) provides a unique laboratory for the study of the lifecycle of dust given its low metallicity (~1/5 solar) and relative proximity (~60 kpc). This motivated the SAGE-SMC (Surveying the Agents of Galaxy Evolution in the Tidally-Stripped, Low Metallicity Small Magellanic Cloud) Spitzer Legacy program with the specific goals of studying the amount and type of dust in the present interstellar medium, the sources of dust in the winds of evolved stars, and how much dust is consumed in star formation. This program mapped the full SMC (30 sq. deg.) including the Body, Wing, and Tail in 7 bands from 3.6 to 160 micron using the IRAC and MIPS instruments on the Spitzer Space Telescope. The data were reduced, mosaicked, and the point sources measured using customized routines specific for large surveys. We have made the resulting mosaics and point source catalogs available to the community. The infrared colors of the SMC are compared to those of other nearby galaxies and the 8 micron/24 micron ratio is somewhat lower and the 70 micron/160 micron ratio is somewhat higher than the average. The global infrared spectral energy distribution shows that the SMC has ~3X lower aromatic emission/PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) abundances compared to most nearby galaxies. Infrared color-magnitude diagrams are given illustrating the distribution of different asymptotic giant branch stars and the locations of young stellar objects. Finally, the average spectral energy distribution (SED) of HII/star formation regions is compared to the equivalent Large Magellanic Cloud average HII/star formation region SED. These preliminary results are expanded in detail in companion papers.
    The Astronomical Journal 07/2011; 142(4). DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/142/4/102 · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present Spitzer Space Telescope spectroscopy of the CO2 ice absorption feature at 15.2 μm toward 41 high-mass young stellar objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). As the shape of the CO2 absorption profile is a measure of both the composition and thermal history of the ice, we have performed a decomposition of the spectral profiles to determine the nature of the CO2 ice. We fit the absorption profiles to laboratory analogues of ice spectra with two different methods: (1) a five-component fit with polar and apolar ices and (2) a two-component fit with a polar and an annealed H2O:CH3OH:CO2 ice mixture. Many of the LMC sources have a pronounced double peak in their CO2 feature profiles analogous to that seen from pure CO2 or annealed CO2 laboratory ice mixtures; these represent the first direct detections of the characteristic double peak in an extragalactic environment. Fits to annealed laboratory ices suggest that the ices around massive LMC young stellar objects (YSOs) have been warmed and thermally processed. We find that a majority of the CO2 is embedded in a polar ice matrix; however, the observations suggest that a lower fraction of CO2 is locked in polar ices in the LMC compared to the Milky Way, which is in agreement with the proposed lower LMC abundance of water ice. In addition, we find that the ices are best fit with laboratory ice mixtures composed of less than 50% methanol, and most absorption spectra can be fit by ices with no methanol. Finally, we corroborate mounting evidence of an enhanced CO2 ice abundance in the LMC relative to the Milky Way, and determine a CO2/H2O ratio of 0.33 ± 0.01 by combining the column densities of these observations with those in the literature.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2010; 727(1):36. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/727/1/36 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The H II complex N 159 in the Large Magellanic Cloud is used to study massive star formation in different environments, as it contains three giant molecular clouds (GMCs) that have similar sizes and masses but exhibit different intensities of star formation. We identify candidate massive young stellar objects (YSOs) using infrared photometry, and model their spectral energy distributions to constrain mass and evolutionary state. Good fits are obtained for less evolved Type I, I/II, and II sources. Our analysis suggests that there are massive embedded YSOs in N 159B, a maser source, and several ultracompact H II regions. Massive O-type YSOs are found in GMCs N 159-E and N 159-W, which are associated with ionized gas, i.e., where massive stars formed a few Myr ago. The third GMC, N 159-S, has neither O-type YSOs nor evidence of previous massive star formation. This correlation between current and antecedent formation of massive stars suggests that energy feedback is relevant. We present evidence that N 159-W is forming YSOs spontaneously, while collapse in N 159-E may be triggered. Finally, we compare star formation rates determined from YSO counts with those from integrated Hα and 24 μm luminosities and expected from gas surface densities. Detailed dissection of extragalactic GMCs like the one presented here is key to revealing the physics underlying commonly used star formation scaling laws.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2010; 721(2):1206. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/721/2/1206 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: It has often been suggested that supernova remnants (SNRs) can trigger star formation. To investigate the relationship between SNRs and star formation, we have examined the known sample of 45 SNRs in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to search for associated young stellar objects (YSOs) and molecular clouds. We find seven SNRs associated with both YSOs and molecular clouds, three SNRs associated with YSOs but not molecular clouds, and eight SNRs near molecular clouds but not associated with YSOs. Among the 10 SNRs associated with YSOs, the association between the YSOs and SNRs either can be rejected or cannot be convincingly established for eight cases. Only two SNRs have YSOs closely aligned along their rims; however, the time elapsed since the SNR began to interact with the YSOs' natal clouds is much shorter than the contraction timescales of the YSOs, and thus we do not see any evidence of SNR-triggered star formation in the LMC. The 15 SNRs that are near molecular clouds may trigger star formation in the future when the SNR shocks have slowed down to <45 km s–1. We discuss how SNRs can alter the physical properties and abundances of YSOs.
    The Astronomical Journal 07/2010; 140(2):584. DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/140/2/584 · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have revealed a large population of young stellar objects (YSOs), but complementary high-resolution images in the optical or near-IR wavelengths are still needed to resolve the multiplicity and immediate environments of the YSOs. The Hubble Space Telescope imaged the star-forming region NGC 2074 in the LMC during its 100,000th orbit, providing an opportunity to more closely examine the YSOs and their environments in this region. We have studied the 10 YSO candidates identified from Spitzer observations, confirming their nature and determining their physical parameters by modeling their spectral energy distributions. The majority of the YSOs and central stars of ultracompact H II regions in NGC 2074 have masses consistent with spectral types of early B to late O. The co-existence of massive early-type O stars and the less massive YSOs indicates that their formation may have started at a similar time, a few 105 yr ago. NGC 2074 provides an opportunity to study the evolution of massive stars at their infancy.
    The Astronomical Journal 12/2009; 139(1):158. DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/139/1/158 · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have used archival Hubble Space Telecope (HST) Hα images to study the immediate environments of massive and intermediate-mass young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The sample of YSO candidates, taken from Gruendl & Chu, was selected based on Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the entire LMC and complementary ground-based optical and near-infrared observations. We found HST Hα images for 99 YSO candidates in the LMC, of which 82 appear to be genuine YSOs. More than 95% of the YSOs are found to be associated with molecular clouds. YSOs are seen in three different kinds of environments in the Hα images: in dark clouds, inside or on the tip of bright-rimmed dust pillars, and in small H II regions. Comparisons of spectral energy distributions for YSOs in these three different kinds of environments suggest that YSOs in dark clouds are the youngest, YSOs with small H II regions are the most evolved, and YSOs in bright-rimmed dust pillars span a range of intermediate evolutionary stages. This rough evolutionary sequence is substantiated by the presence of silicate absorption features in the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph spectra of some YSOs in dark clouds and in bright-rimmed dust pillars, but not those of YSOs in small H II regions. We present a discussion on triggered star formation for YSOs in bright-rimmed dust pillars or in dark clouds adjacent to H II regions. As many as 50% of the YSOs are resolved into multiple sources in high-resolution HST images. This illustrates the importance of using high-resolution images to probe the true nature and physical properties of YSOs in the LMC.
    The Astrophysical Journal 12/2009; 707(2):1417. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/707/2/1417 · 6.28 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [abridged] We present 52-93 micron spectra obtained with Spitzer in the MIPS-SED mode, of a representative sample of luminous compact far-IR sources in the LMC. These include carbon stars, OH/IR AGB stars, post-AGB objects and PNe, RCrB-type star HV2671, OH/IR red supergiants WOHG064 and IRAS05280-6910, B[e] stars IRAS04530-6916, R66 and R126, Wolf-Rayet star Brey3a, Luminous Blue Variable R71, supernova remnant N49, a large number of young stellar objects, compact HII regions and molecular cores, and a background galaxy (z~0.175). We use the spectra to constrain the presence and temperature of cold dust and the excitation conditions and shocks within the neutral and ionized gas, in the circumstellar environments and interfaces with the surrounding ISM. Evolved stars, including LBV R71, lack cold dust except in some cases where we argue that this is swept-up ISM. This leads to an estimate of the duration of the prolific dust-producing phase ("superwind") of several thousand years for both RSGs and massive AGB stars, with a similar fractional mass loss experienced despite the different masses. We tentatively detect line emission from neutral oxygen in the extreme RSG WOHG064, with implications for the wind driving. In N49, the shock between the supernova ejecta and ISM is revealed by its strong [OI] 63-micron emission and possibly water vapour; we estimate that 0.2 Msun of ISM dust was swept up. Some of the compact HII regions display pronounced [OIII] 88-micron emission. The efficiency of photo-electric heating in the interfaces of ionized gas and molecular clouds is estimated at 0.1-0.3%. We confirm earlier indications of a low nitrogen content in the LMC. Evidence for solid state emission features is found in both young and evolved object; some of the YSOs are found to contain crystalline water ice. Comment: Accepted for publication in The Astronomical Journal. This paper accompanies the Summer 2009 SAGE-Spec release of 48 MIPS-SED spectra, but uses improved spectrum extraction. (Fig. 2 reduced resolution because of arXiv limit.)
    The Astronomical Journal 10/2009; 139(1). DOI:10.1088/0004-6256/139/1/68 · 4.05 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present and categorize Spitzer infrared spectrometer spectra of 294 objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) to create the largest and most complete catalog of massive young stellar object (YSO) spectra in the LMC. Target sources were identified from infrared photometry and multiwavelength images indicative of young, massive stars highly enshrouded in their natal gas and dust clouds. Several objects have been spectroscopically identified as non-YSOs and have features similar to more-evolved stars such as red supergiants, asymptotic giant branch (AGB), and post-AGB stars. Our sample primarily consists of 277 objects we identify as having spectral features indicative of embedded YSOs. The remaining sources are comprised of seven C-rich evolved sources, eight sources dominated by broad silicate emission, and one source with multiple broad emission features. Those with YSO-like spectra show a range of spectral features including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission, deep silicate absorption, fine-structure lines, and ice absorption features. Based upon the relative strengths of these features, we have classified the YSO candidates into several distinct categories using the widely used statistical procedure known as principal component analysis. We propose that these categories represent a spectrum of evolutionary stages during massive YSO formation. Using our catalog we put statistical constraints on the relative evolutionary timescale of processes involved in massive star formation. We conclude that massive pre-main-sequence stars spend a majority (possibly as high as 90%) of their massive, embedded lives emitting in the UV. Half of the sources in our study have features typical of compact H II regions, suggesting that massive YSOs can create a detectable compact H II region half-way through the formation time present in our sample. This study also provides a check on commonly used source-selection procedures including the use of photometry to identify YSOs. We determine that a high success rate (>95%) of identifying objects with YSO-like spectra can be achieved through careful use of infrared color-magnitude diagrams, spectral energy distributions, and image inspections.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2009; 699(1):150. DOI:10.1088/0004-637X/699/1/150 · 6.28 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

314 Citations
156.00 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2000–2015
    • University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
      • Department of Astronomy
      Urbana, IL, United States
  • 2013–2014
    • National Radio Astronomy Observatory
      Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • 2012–2014
    • Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy
      Bonn, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany
  • 2009–2014
    • University of Virginia
      • Department of Astronomy
      Charlottesville, Virginia, United States
  • 2011
    • University of Wisconsin, Madison
      • Department of Astronomy
      Mississippi, United States