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Publications (3)3.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The frequent incidence of postoperative vomiting in children undergoing tonsillectomy, in addition to the occurrence of severe pain, may delay postoperative oral intake and lead to increased risk of dehydration. Thus, prophylactic therapy is indicated in this high-risk group. Glucocorticoids, such as dexamethasone and methylprednisolone, have anti-inflammatory and antiemetic properties with dexamethasone being frequently used. We hypothesized that methylprednisolone should be noninferior to dexamethasone for the prevention of vomiting in children after tonsillectomy. We designed a randomized double-blind trial to compare the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of 0.5 mg/kg dexamethasone with a dose of 2.5 mg/kg methylprednisolone on the incidence of postoperative vomiting during the first 24 hours (primary outcome) in children undergoing total or partial tonsillectomy with a noninferiority margin set at 9%. One hundred sixty children undergoing total or partial tonsillectomy under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive either IV dexamethasone 0.5 mg/kg (n = 79) or methylprednisolone 2.5 mg/kg (n = 81) after induction of anesthesia. Secondary analysis of all studied outcomes was also performed according to the type of surgery. An intention-to-treat analysis showed an overall incidence of vomiting of 30% in the dexamethasone group and of 22% in the methylprednisolone group (difference: 8%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -5% to 21%). A per protocol analysis showed an incidence of vomiting of 32% and 23%, respectively (difference: 9%, and 95% CI of the difference: -5 to 23%, P(sup) = 0.28). The time and quality of oral intake and the duration of IV hydration, as well as pain and satisfaction scores and the need for analgesics, were similar between the 2 groups. The incidence of vomiting was also similar in patients who had total versus partial tonsillectomy; however, time to first oral intake, duration of IV hydration, and the need for analgesics were less with better satisfaction scores in partial versus total tonsillectomy patients. Methylprednisolone is at worst 5% less effective than dexamethasone by the intention-to-treat analysis, and by the per protocol analysis. Thus, it is noninferior to dexamethasone in preventing vomiting after tonsillectomy in children.
    Anesthesia and analgesia 07/2012; 115(4):913-20. · 3.08 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE : The results of a series of 8 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS), treated with microsurgical vascular decompression (MVD) are reported. METHOD : A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in all patients prior to surgery. The presence of arterial hypertension (HT) was noted. MVD was performed through a retromastoid approach, and Gortex® was interposed between the nerve and the conflicting vessel. RE S U L T S : The offending vessels found were : the antero-inferior cerebellar artery in 50% of the cases, the postero-inferior cerebellar artery in 25% and the vertebral artery in 25%. These findings were positive- ly correlated with MRI in only 50% of cases. The surgical results were the following : total and immediate relief in 62.5% of cases, delayed relief in 25%, and partial relief in 12.5%. Neither failure, nor recurrence were noted. In terms of complications, two cases of persisting hearing loss, one case of transient hearing loss, and two cases of persisting facial palsy. Hypertension improved in 20% of cases. CO N C L U S I O N : This study shows the success of MVD in the treatment of HFS. Intraoperative monitoring is helpful in reducing the complication rate. In our practice, the correlation between MRI find- ings and surgery was poor, as opposed to the results found in literature.
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    ABSTRACT: The results of a series of 8 patients with hemifacial spasm (HFS), treated with microsurgical vascular decompression (MVD) are reported. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain was performed in all patients prior to surgery. The presence of arterial hypertension (HT) was noted. MVD was performed through a retromastoid approach, and Gortex was interposed between the nerve and the conflicting vessel. The offending vessels found were: the antero-inferior cerebellar artery in 50% of the cases, the postero-inferior cerebellar artery in 25% and the vertebral artery in 25%. These findings were positively correlated with MRI in only 50% of cases. The surgical results were the following: total and immediate relief in 62.5% of cases, delayed relief in 25%, and partial relief in 12.5%. Neither failure, nor recurrence were noted. In terms of complications, two cases of persisting hearing loss, one case of transient hearing loss, and two cases of persisting facial palsy. Hypertension improved in 20% of cases. This study shows the success of MVD in the treatment of HFS. Intraoperative monitoring is helpful in reducing the complication rate. In our practice, the correlation between MRI findings and surgery was poor, as opposed to the results found in literature.
    Le Journal médical libanais. The Lebanese medical journal 54(3):146-51.