Wytze J Vlietstra

University of Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (3)8.92 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) provides a powerful technique to separate proteins on their isoelectric point and apparent molecular mass and quantify changes in protein expression. Abundantly available proteins in spots can be identified using mass spectrometry-based approaches. However, identification is often not possible for low-abundant proteins.ResultsWe present a novel computational approach to prioritize candidate proteins for unidentified spots. Our approach exploits noisy information on the isoelectric point and apparent molecular mass of a protein spot in combination with functional similarities of candidate proteins to already identified proteins to select and rank candidates. We evaluated our method on a 2D-DIGE dataset comparing protein expression in uninfected and HIV-1 infected T-cells. Using leave-one-out cross-validation, we show that the true-positive rate for the top-5 ranked proteins is 43.8%.Conclusions Our approach shows good performance on a 2D-DIGE dataset comparing protein expression in uninfected and HIV-1 infected T-cells. We expect our method to be highly useful in (re-)mining other 2D-DIGE experiments in which especially the low-abundant protein spots remain to be identified.
    BMC Bioinformatics 01/2015; 16(1):25. DOI:10.1186/s12859-015-0455-x · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This mini-review summarizes techniques applied in, and results obtained with, proteomic studies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-T cell interaction. Our group previously reported on the use of two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled to matrix assisted laser-desorption time of flight peptide mass fingerprint analysis, to study T cell responses upon HIV-1 infection. Only one in three differentially expressed proteins could be identified using this experimental setup. Here we report on our latest efforts to test models generated by this data set and extend its analysis by using novel bioinformatic algorithms. The 2D-DIGE results are compared with other studies including a pilot study using one-dimensional peptide separation coupled to MS(E), a novel mass spectrometric approach. It can be concluded that although the latter method detects fewer proteins, it is much faster and less labor intensive. Last but not least, recent developments and remaining challenges in the field of proteomic studies of HIV-1 infection and proteomics in general are discussed.
    Frontiers in Microbiology 07/2012; 3:240. DOI:10.3389/fmicb.2012.00240 · 3.94 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the applicability and benefits of the new WHO dengue fever guidelines in clinical practice, for returning travellers. We compared differences in specificity and sensitivity between the old and the new guidelines for diagnosing dengue and assessed the usefulness in predicting the clinical course of the disease. Also, we investigated whether hypertension, diabetes or allergies, ethnicity or high age influenced the course of disease. In our setting, the old classification, compared with the new, had a marginally higher sensitivity for diagnosing dengue. The new classification had a slightly higher specificity and was less rigid. Patients with dengue who had warning signs as postulated in the new classification were admitted more often than those who had no warning signs (RR, 8.09 [1.80-35.48]). We did not find ethnicity, age, hypertension, diabetes mellitus or allergies to be predictive of the clinical course. In our cohort of returned travellers, the new classification system did not differ in sensitivity and specificity from the old system to a clinically relevant degree. The guidelines did not improve identification of severe disease.
    Tropical Medicine & International Health 06/2012; 17(8):1023-30. DOI:10.1111/j.1365-3156.2012.03020.x · 2.30 Impact Factor