Budi Kusnoto

University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

Are you Budi Kusnoto?

Claim your profile

Publications (38)33.4 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A digital analysis that is shown to be accurate will ease the demonstration of initial case complexity. To date, no literature exists on the accuracy of the digital American Board of Orthodontics Discrepancy Index (DI) calculations when applied to pretreatment digital models. Plaster models were obtained from 45 previous patients with varying degrees of malocclusion. Total DI scores and the target disorders were computed manually with a periodontal probe on the original plaster casts (gold standard) and digitally using Ortho Insight 3D (Motion View Software, Hixson, Tenn) and OrthoCAD (Cadent, Carlstadt, NJ). Intrarater and interrater reliabilities were assessed for 15 subjects using the Spearman rho correlation test. Accuracies of the DI scores and target disorders were assessed for all 45 subjects using Wilcoxon signed ranks tests. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities were high for total DI scores and most target disorders (r > 0.8). No significant difference was found between total DI score when measured with OrthoCAD compared with manual calculations. The total DI scores calculated by Ortho Insight 3D were found to be significantly greater than those by manual calculation by 2.71 points. The findings indicate that a DI calculated by Ortho Insight 3D may lead the clinician to overestimate case complexity. OrthoCAD's DI module was demonstrated to be a clinically acceptable alternative to manual calculation of the total scores. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 07/2015; 148(1):60-6. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2015.02.027 · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate the accuracy of the three-dimensional clinical outcome of root inclination (faciolingual torque) and angulation (mesiodistal tip) of SureSmileTM (SS)-treated cases.
    06/2015; 4(2). DOI:10.1016/j.ejwf.2015.04.001
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to evaluate dental and skeletal changes after a comprehensive orthodontic treatment protocol involving the use of Forsus fatigue-resistant device.
    03/2015; 4(1). DOI:10.1016/j.ejwf.2014.11.004
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is a retrospective cephalometric radiographic study that evaluates growth changes in subjects with Class II skeletal pattern treated with slow maxillary expansion Quad-Helix and overbite reduction utility arches.
    02/2015; 4(1). DOI:10.1016/j.ejwf.2014.11.002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Medicaid patients have been associated with lack of compliance during their orthodontic treatment in comparison with the non-Medicaid patients. In this study, Medicaid and non-Medicaid orthodontic patients’ compliance from a state university and private practice orthodontic clinic within close location were analyzed.Methods Charts of 30 Medicaid and 30 non-Medicaid orthodontic patients at each orthodontic clinic were reviewed. From each chart, mean percentage of failed and late appointments, number of broken appliances, number of comments on compliance with auxiliary wear and number of comments on oral hygiene maintenance were recorded.ResultsStatistically significant differences between Medicaid and non-Medicaid orthodontic patients were not found.Conclusions The results of this study indicated that in general there are no differences between Medicaid and non-Medicaid orthodontic patients.Practical ImplicationsThese results may alleviate the doubts of the dental practitioner in treating Medicaid patients.
    Special Care in Dentistry 07/2014; 35(2). DOI:10.1111/scd.12085
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Three-dimensional cephalometric analyses are getting more attraction in orthodontics. The aim of this study was to compare two softwares to evaluate three-dimensional cephalometric analyses of orthodontic treatment outcomes. Twenty cone beam computed tomography images were obtained using i-CAT(®) imaging system from patient's records as part of their regular orthodontic records. The images were analyzed using InVivoDental5.0 (Anatomage Inc.) and 3DCeph™ (University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA) software. Before and after orthodontic treatments data were analyzed using t-test. Reliability test using interclass correlation coefficient was stronger for InVivoDental5.0 (0.83-0.98) compared with 3DCeph™ (0.51-0.90). Paired t-test comparison of the two softwares shows no statistical significant difference in the measurements made in the two softwares. InVivoDental5.0 measurements are more reproducible and user friendly when compared to 3DCeph™. No statistical difference between the two softwares in linear or angular measurements. 3DCeph™ is more time-consuming in performing three-dimensional analysis compared with InVivoDental5.0.
    01/2014; 3(4):111-117. DOI:10.4103/2278-0203.143230
  • Sayeh Ehsani · Terry Carlyle · Tarek El-Bialy · Budi Kusnoto
    Journal of clinical orthodontics: JCO 05/2012; 46(5):301-6.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: To evaluate various types of stress in cortical bone around miniscrew implants using finite element analysis. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six three-dimensional assemblies of miniscrew models placed in alveolar bone blocks were constructed using Abaqus (Dassault Systèmes Simulia Corp, Providence, RI), a commercial finite element analysis software package. The model variables included implant design factors and bone-related factors. All miniscrew implants were loaded in the mesial direction with a linear force equal to 2 N. Peak von Mises and principal stress values in cortical bone were compared between the different models for each factor. Results: The results demonstrated that some factors affected the stresses in bone (implant diameter, implant head length, thread size, and elastic modulus of cancellous bone), while other factors did not (thread shape, thread pitch, and cortical bone thickness). Conclusions: Miniscrew implant diameter, head length, and thread size as well as the elastic modulus of cancellous bone affect the stresses in cortical bone layer surrounding the miniscrew implant and may therefore affect its stability.
    The Angle Orthodontist 03/2012; 82(5):875-80. DOI:10.2319/111011-696.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the actions and effectiveness of topical anesthetics TAC Alternate (TAC((a))) and Oraqix in placing temporary anchorage devices (TADs). Each topical anesthetic was placed on opposing sides in the maxilla or mandible using blinded applicators for 3-9 minutes followed by the TAD placement. A total of 21 patients ranging from 10-25 years old were studied. During the procedure the primary investigator (PI) used the sound, eye, and motor scale to measure the movements elicited by the patient. The PI also noted the time taken for the topical anesthetic to be effective and the amount that was applied. Following the placement of the TADs, the patients were given the Wong-Baker FACES Scale and the Visual Analog Scale to rate the degree of discomfort. The nonparametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test the effectiveness of the treatments based on the three ordinal scales, the dosage, and the onset time. The time it took for the TAC((a)) to provide adequate anesthesia averaged 4.43 minutes and for Oraqix the time was 6.33 minutes (P = .00). The minimum dosage of TAC((a)) to provide adequate anesthesia averaged 0.25 mL, and for Oraqix the minimum dosage averaged 0.31 mL (P = .00). The hypothesis was rejected. TAC((a)) was more effective than Oraqix in placing TADs with a recommended dose of 0.20-0.30 mL and a minimum application time of 3 minutes.
    The Angle Orthodontist 05/2011; 81(5):754-9. DOI:10.2319/020811-91.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Matthew Israel · Budi Kusnoto · Carla A Evans · Ellen Begole
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the accuracy of bracket placement produced by OrthoCAD iQ indirect bonding (IDB) and that of an in-house fabricated IDB system by measuring the quality of intra-arch dental alignment at the end of simulated orthodontic treatment. Twenty-eight artificial teeth were arranged to resemble a typical preorthodontic malocclusion. Forty-six sets of models were duplicated from the original malocclusion and randomly divided into two sample groups. Half of the models had their bracket positions selected by OrthoCAD, while the others were completed by a combination of faculty and residents in a university orthodontic department. Indirect bonding trays were fabricated for each sample and the brackets were transferred back to the original malocclusion following typical bonding protocol. The individual teeth were ligated on a .021 × .025-inch stainless steel archwire to simulate their posttreatment positions. The two sample groups were compared using the objective grading system (OGS) originally designed by the American Board of Orthodontics. The mean total OGS score for the OrthoCAD sample group was 39.25 points, while the traditional IDB technique scored 41.00 points. No statistical difference was found between total scores or any of the four components evaluated. Similar ranges of scores were observed, with the OrthoCAD group scoring from 30 to 52 points and the traditional IDB group scoring from 33 to 53 points. The hypothesis is not accepted. OrthoCAD iQ does not currently offer a system that can position orthodontic brackets better or more reliably than traditional indirect bonding techniques.
    The Angle Orthodontist 04/2011; 81(5):828-35. DOI:10.2319/072110-425.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To test the hypotheses that the Damon system will maintain intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar widths. To test subsequent hypotheses that the Damon system will not produce a significant difference in maxillary and mandibular incisor position/angulation when compared with control groups treated with conventional fixed orthodontic appliances for similar malocclusion. Subjects treated with the Damon system (N  =  27) were compared with subjects treated with a conventionally ligated edgewise bracket system (N  =  16). Subjects' pretreatment and posttreatment lateral cephalometric radiographs and dental models were scanned, measured, and compared to see whether significant differences exist between time points and between the two groups. Results did not support the claimed lip bumper effect of the Damon system and showed similar patterns of crowding alleviation, including transverse expansion and incisor advancement, in both groups, regardless of the bracket system used. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar widths increased significantly after treatment with the Damon system. The mandibular incisors were significantly advanced and proclined after treatment with the Damon system, contradicting the lip bumper theory of Damon. Posttreatment incisor inclinations did not differ significantly between the Damon group and the control group. Patients treated with the Damon system completed treatment on average 2 months faster than patients treated with a conventionally ligated standard edgewise bracket system.
    The Angle Orthodontist 03/2011; 81(4):647-52. DOI:10.2319/071910-420.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • S. EHSANI · T. EL-BIALY · T.D. CARLYLE · B. KUSNOTO
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: The aim of this study is to evaluate dental and/or skeletal changes following orthodontic treatment with Damon self-ligating (SL) brackets in non-extraction patients. Methods: Frontal and lateral images of 20 patients before and after non-extraction treatment with Damon SL brackets were traced in Dolphin Imaging. Using a computer software program (3Dceph, UIC, IL., USA) these two-dimensional images (i.e. lateral and frontal) were combined in order to generate a three-dimensional (3D) cephalogram. Bolton standards (templates) were used as controls. Bolton templates were also converted into 3D frames using 3Dceph software. Changes in both upper and lower intermolar and intercanine distances of subjects treated with Damon SL brackets were compared to those of corresponding untreated controls. Distances between both crowns and roots were studied. Also, skeletal measurements of maxillary basal bone widths were evaluated. Results: Nonparametric (Mann-Whitney) tests showed that differences in changes of the following outcome variables were statistically significant between Damon group and controls: distance between roots of upper molars (P-value<.001) (+4.59mm in Damon group vs. +.8mm in Control group) and distance between roots of lower canines (P-value= .001) (+2.19mm in Damon group vs. +.18mm in Control group). There were no statistically significant differences in changes of the other outcome variables (P-value>.01). Paired t-tests and Nonparametric (Wilcoxon) tests showed that there were no statistically significant changes in angles made by each first molar and Crista Galli-A point line and in interjugular distance (P-value>.01) before and after treatment with Damon brackets. Conclusion: With regards to transverse dimensions, a three-dimensional analysis revealed that cases treated with Damon SL brackets showed greater increase of distance between roots of upper molars and between roots of lower canines compared to untreated cases. No tipping of molars or expansion of maxillary base was observed following Damon treatment, whereas both upper and lower incisors were protruded.
    AADR Annual Meeting 2010; 03/2010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the efficacy of tooth movement with removable polyurethane aligners (Invisalign, Align Technology, Santa Clara, Calif). The study sample included 37 patients treated with Anterior Invisalign. Four hundred one anterior teeth (198 maxillary and 203 mandibular) were measured on the virtual Treat models. The virtual model of the predicted tooth position was superimposed over the virtual model of the achieved tooth position, created from the posttreatment impression, and the 2 models were superimposed over their stationary posterior teeth by using ToothMeasure, Invisalign's proprietary superimposition software. The amount of tooth movement predicted was compared with the amount achieved after treatment. The types of movements studied were expansion, constriction, intrusion, extrusion, mesiodistal tip, labiolingual tip, and rotation. The mean accuracy of tooth movement with Invisalign was 41%. The most accurate movement was lingual constriction (47.1%), and the least accurate movement was extrusion (29.6%)- specifically, extrusion of the maxillary (18.3%) and mandibular (24.5%) central incisors, followed by mesiodistal tipping of the mandibular canines (26.9%). The accuracy of canine rotation was significantly lower than that of all other teeth, with the exception of the maxillary lateral incisors. At rotational movements greater than 15 degrees, the accuracy of rotation for the maxillary canines fell significantly. Lingual crown tip was significantly more accurate than labial crown tip, particularly for the maxillary incisors. There was no statistical difference in accuracy between maxillary and mandibular teeth of the same tooth type for any movements studied. We still have much to learn regarding the biomechanics and efficacy of the Invisalign system. A better understanding of Invisalign's ability to move teeth might help the clinician select suitable patients for treatment, guide the proper sequencing of movement, and reduce the need for case refinement.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 02/2009; 135(1):27-35. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.05.018 · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The availability of new, reliable, objective, and 3-dimensional techniques to assess the effects of rapid maxillary expansion on the morphology of the maxillary dental arch, nasal cavity dimensions, and nasal airway resistance led to the development of this research. Thirty-eight subjects participated in this study (mean age, 13 years). Data were collected before expansion, when the expander was stabilized, when the expander was removed, and 9 to 12 months after the expander was removed. Subjective assessment of improvement in nasal respiration was obtained when the expander was stabilized. Three-dimensional imaging and acoustic rhinometry were used to assess the virtual cast and the nasal cavity, respectively. The statistically significant short-term effects of RME were (1) mean increases in palatal area, volume, and intermolar distance; (2) a mean reduction of nasal airway resistance; and (3) mean increases in total nasal volume and nasal valve area. Our long-term findings were the following: (1) mean palatal area and intermolar distance were reduced, while palatal volume was stable, and (2) nasal airway resistance was stable, whereas mean nasal cavity volume and minimal cross-sectional area increased. Additionally, 61.3% of our subjects reported subjective improvement in nasal respiration. Weak correlations were found between all variables analyzed.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 10/2008; 134(3):370-82. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2006.10.034 · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Neal D Kravitz · Budi Kusnoto · Brent Agran · Grace Viana
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the influence of attachments and interproximal reduction on canines undergoing rotational movement with Invisalign. In this prospective clinical study, 53 canines (33 maxillary and 20 mandibular) were measured from the virtual TREAT models of 31 participants treated with anterior Invisalign. The pretreatment virtual model of the predicted final tooth position was superimposed on the posttreatment virtual model using ToothMeasure, Invisalign's proprietary measurement software. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (P < .05) compared three treatment modalities: attachments only (AO), interproximal reduction only (IO), and neither attachments nor interproximal reduction (N). Student's t-tests (P < .05) compared the mean accuracy of canine rotation between arches. The mean accuracy of canine rotation with Invisalign was 35.8% (SD = 26.3). Statistical analyses indicated that there was no significant difference in accuracy between groups AO, IO, and N (P = .343). There was no statistically significant difference (P = .888) in rotational accuracy for maxillary and mandibular canines for any of the treatment groups. The most commonly prescribed attachment shape was the vertical-ellipsoid (70.5%). Vertical-ellipsoid attachments and interproximal reduction do not significantly improve the accuracy of canine rotation with the Invisalign system.
    The Angle Orthodontist 08/2008; 78(4):682-7. DOI:10.2319/0003-3219(2008)078[0682:IOAAIR]2.0.CO;2 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Neal D Kravitz · Budi Kusnoto
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Soft-tissue lasers have numerous applications in orthodontics, including gingivectomy, frenectomy, operculectomy, papilla flattening, uncovering temporary anchorage devices, ablation of aphthous ulcerations, exposure of impacted teeth, and even tooth whitening. As an adjunctive procedure, laser surgery has helped many orthodontists to enhance the design of a patient's smile and improve treatment efficacy. Before incorporating soft-tissue lasers into clinical practice, the clinician must fully understand the basic science, safety protocol, and risks associated with them. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview regarding safe and proper use of soft-tissue lasers in orthodontics.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 05/2008; 133(4 Suppl):S110-4. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.01.026 · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Loss of the mandibular first molar often leads to the overeruption of the opposing maxillary first molar, resulting in occlusal interference, loss of periodontal bony support, and inadequate room to restore the mandibular edentulous space. Without orthodontic molar intrusion or segmental surgical impaction, restoring the posterior occlusion often entails the need for significant reduction of maxillary molar crown height, with the potential need for costly iatrogenic root canal therapy and restoration. The literature has cited successful maxillary molar intrusion with minor prosthodontic reduction using palatal orthodontic miniscrews and buccal zygomatic miniplates. In this report, the authors present successful maxillary molar intrusion with two orthodontic miniscrews in a patient with extreme dental anxiety and significant dental erosion due to gastric reflux. Using two orthodontic miniscrews for skeletal anchorage to intrude the maxillary molar simplified the orthodontic treatment by eliminating the need for extensive surgery, headgear, and intraoral multiunit anchorage and preserved indispensable tooth enamel. The clinical results showed significant intrusion through the maxillary sinus cortical floor while maintaining periodontal health, tooth vitality, and root length.
    The Angle Orthodontist 10/2007; 77(5):915-22. DOI:10.2319/050106-187.1 · 1.28 Impact Factor
  • Budi Kusnoto
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Cephalometric radiographs provide for standardized skull/facial views that allow for comparison over time to assess growth in an individual, and to compare that individual against standardized population norms. Cephalometric analysis and surgical prediction are done by robust cephalometric imaging software that can rapidly analyze the radiograph, and retrace and recalculate the analysis for a variety of possible surgical outcomes; however, the validity of the prediction depends on the accuracy of the records, the algorithm specific to the software, and the specifics of the patient population. Three-dimensional digital imaging to replace conventional two-dimensional photographic images and CT scans, with corresponding cephalometric analysis to replace two-dimensional cephalometric films, is already on the horizon.
    Clinics in plastic surgery 08/2007; 34(3):417-26. DOI:10.1016/j.cps.2007.04.005 · 1.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The lower frictional resistance produced by passive self-ligating brackets can be helpful during orthodontic sliding mechanics. The aims of this study were to evaluate the frictional resistance of brackets with passive ligation and to compare these values with corresponding controls. Two passive self-ligating brackets (Damon SL II, Sybron Dental Specialties/Ormco, Orange, Calif; SmartClip, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) and 1 novel bracket with passive elastic ligation (Synergy, Rocky Mountain Orthodontics, Denver, Colo) were used. The brackets were coupled with 3 nickel-titanium archwires (0.014-in round, 0.016 x 0.022-in, 0.019 x 0.025-in) in a simulated ideal arch introducing first-order rotations of 3 degrees and 6 degrees, second-order intrusions of 0.5 and 1.0 mm, and a third-order labial crown inclination of 3 degrees . The dimensions of the brackets were measured with scanning electron micrographs. The results of initial maximum drawing forces (IMDF) were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA and 1-way ANOVA tests. The SmartClip bracket had larger critical angles and distances for binding than the other 2 brackets. When coupled with 0.019 x 0.025-in archwires in an ideal arch alignment, SmartClip brackets had lower IMDF than the other brackets. For the first-order rotations, Synergy brackets had significantly lower IMDF than the other brackets. Damon SL II brackets with smaller critical angles had greater IMDF. For the third-order inclination, the Damon SL II brackets with less torsional play also had greater IMDF. No significant differences of IMDF were found for all the brackets tested in second-order intrusions. However, IMDF increased as the severity of the malocclusion increased. No significant bracket differences were found when binding occurred in second-order distances. In an ideal arch alignment, brackets with greater slot lumen have lower frictional resistance. First-order rotational control was influenced by slot depth, bracket width, and labial cover of the brackets with the same archwire. When a sliding mechanism was used with a third-order inclination change, the brackets with smaller third-order critical contact angles had greater frictional resistance.
    American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics: official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics 07/2007; 131(6):704.e11-22. DOI:10.1016/j.ajodo.2006.09.041 · 1.44 Impact Factor
  • Neal D Kravitz · Budi Kusnoto · William F Hohlt
    Journal of clinical orthodontics: JCO 05/2007; 41(4):224-6.