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Publications (2)3.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to assess the natural history of bone bruise and bone mineral density (BMD) after traumatic hip dislocations and conservatively treated acetabular fractures. Our hypothesis was that poor bone quality can influence degree of bone bruise and, in time, cause degenerative changes. Eight consecutive patients with traumatic hip dislocations and five patients with conservatively treated fractures in the femoral head and/or acetabulum were included. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained after 1, 17, 42, 82 and 97 weeks. Dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) measurements were made after 10 days and 2 years. Sizes of bone bruise lesions were measured and classified. At the 2-year follow-up, Harris hip score (HHS) was calculated and signs of radiological osteoarthritis (OA) registered. The bone bruise changes were small and all changes resolved within 42 weeks in all, except for three patients; one with a small Pipkin fracture had segmental avascular necrosis (AVN) of the femoral head, one had persisting1-3mm small spots of bone bruises in the femoral head and the third had <1cm lesions in both the femoral head and the acetabulum. The lesions were bigger in the femoral head in the hip dislocations and more pronounced in the acetabulum in the fractured acetabuli. We found no significant changes in BMD in four regions of interest (ROIs) after 2 years. No patients developed OA, and all had excellent HHS except for the one patient with AVN. The post-traumatic bone bruise changes in the dislocated hips and the fractured acetabuli were small and transient compared to findings of other authors examining traumatised knees. The patients had excellent function and no OA after 2 years if they did not develop AVN. In our small sample of relatively young patients with normal age-adjusted BMD, no post-traumatic osteopenia was observed. This might differ in the elderly with poorer bone quality; further studies are needed to assess that.
    Injury 07/2012; 43(10):1672-7. · 2.46 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Ligament balancing is considered a prerequisite for good function and survival in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, there is no consensus on how to measure ligament balance intra-operatively and the degree of stability obtained after different balancing techniques is not clarified. This study presents a new method to measure ligament balancing in TKA and reports on the results of a try-out of this method and its inter-observer reliability. After the implantation of the prosthesis, spatulas of different thickness were used to measure medial and lateral condylar lift-off in flexion and extension in 70 ligament-balanced knees and in 30 knees were ligament balancing was considered unnecessary. Inter-observer reliability for the new method was estimated and the degree of medial-lateral symmetry in extension and in flexion, and the equality of the extension gaps and flexion gaps were calculated. The method was feasible in all operated knees, and found to be very reliable (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.88). We found no statistically significant difference in condylar lift-off between the ligament-balanced and the non ligament-balanced group, however, there was a tendency to more outliers in flexion in the ligament-balanced group. Our method for measuring ligament balance is reliable and provides valuable information in assessing laxity intra-operatively. This method may be a useful tool in further research on the relationship between ligament balance, function and survival of TKA.
    Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery 05/2012; 132(8):1173-81. · 1.36 Impact Factor