Dinka Ayana

Addis Ababa University, Ādīs Ābeba, Ādīs Ābeba, Ethiopia

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Publications (3)4.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Mites are one of the most common and widely distributed ectoparasites of small ruminants in Ethiopia, contributing to major hindrances in livestock productivity in the country. Despite of this fact, specific study was not conducted on mites of small ruminants in Ethiopia. Therefore, the present study was performed from October 2009 to May 2010 to determine the prevalence and species composition of mites in three agroecological zones in north eastern Ethiopia. In addition, a questionnaire survey on mites was conducted to assess the control practices and awareness of farmers in the study areas. Out of a total of 1280 sheep and 1264 goats examined, 97(7.6 %) of sheep and 174(13.8 %) goats were infested with one or more species of mites. In goats an overall prevalence of 10.3 % Sarcoptes, 2.8 % Demodex and 0.6 % Psoroptes were recorded whereas in sheep an overall prevalence of 3.5 % Sarcoptes, 2.1 % Demodex and 1.6 % Psoroptes were observed. Sarcoptes (P = 0.03; OR = 2.1) and Demodex (OR = 3.25; p = 0.004) were significantly more common in young than in adult sheep. Demodectic mange was significantly higher in young (4.1 %) compared to adult (2.3 %) goats. (OR = 2.2; P = 0.02). Significantly higher (P < 0.01) overall prevalence of sarcoptic and demodectic mites in both sheep and goats with poor than with good body condition was recorded. Results of the questionnaire survey supported results of our cross-sectional study. This study demonstrates high prevalence of mange mites in sheep and goats of the study area. The study revealed that Sarcoptes is the predominant mite in both sheep and goats. Animal owners and veterinarians should consider mite control in small ruminants as part of the routine ectoparasite control in Ethiopia.
    BMC Veterinary Research 05/2015; 11(1):122. DOI:10.1186/s12917-015-0433-6 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    BMC Veterinary Research 05/2015; 11(May):12. · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In Ethiopia, ticks and tick-borne diseases are widely distributed and contribute to important economic losses. Several studies investigated the prevalence and species composition of ticks infesting ruminants; however, data on tick-borne pathogens are still scarce. During the study period from October 2010 to April 2011, a total of 1,246 adult ticks and 264 nymphs were collected from 267 cattle and 45 sheep in Bako District, western Oromia, Ethiopia. The study showed infestation of 228/267 (85.4 %) cattle and 35/45 (77.8 %) sheep with adult ticks. Overall, eight tick species, belonging to three genera (Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus, Hyalomma), were identified and Amblyomma cohaerens (n = 577), Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (n = 290), Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) decoloratus (n = 287), and Amblyomma variegatum (n = 85) were the more prevalent species. A statistically significant host preference in A. cohaerens for cattle and R. evertsi evertsi for sheep was noticed. Molecular detection of piroplasms, performed only for adult ticks of two species of the genus Rhipicephalus (R. evertsi evertsi and R. decoloratus), revealed an overall prevalence of 4 % (8/202) Theileria buffeli/sergenti/orientalis, 0.5 % (1/202) Theileria velifera, and 2 % (4/202) Theileria ovis. The study showed that tick infestation prevalence is considerably high in both cattle and sheep of the area, but with a low intensity of tick burden and a moderate circulation of mildly pathogenic piroplasm species.
    Tropical Animal Health and Production 07/2013; 46(1). DOI:10.1007/s11250-013-0442-z · 0.97 Impact Factor