Agnes K Rucka

The University of Manchester, Manchester, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (2)37.96 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Craniofacial abnormalities account for about one-third of all human congenital defects, but our understanding of the genetic mechanisms governing craniofacial development is incomplete. We show that GTF2IRD1 is a genetic determinant of mammalian craniofacial and cognitive development, and we implicate another member of the TFII-I transcription factor family, GTF2I, in both aspects. Gtf2ird1-null mice exhibit phenotypic abnormalities reminiscent of the human microdeletion disorder Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS); craniofacial imaging reveals abnormalities in both skull and jaws that may arise through misregulation of goosecoid, a downstream target of Gtf2ird1. In humans, a rare WBS individual with an atypical deletion, including GTF2IRD1, shows facial dysmorphism and cognitive deficits that differ from those of classic WBS cases. We propose a mechanism of cumulative dosage effects of duplicated and diverged genes applicable to other human chromosomal disorders.
    Science 12/2005; 310(5751):1184-7. DOI:10.1126/science.1116142 · 33.61 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS) is a congenital narrowing of the ascending aorta which can occur sporadically, as an autosomal dominant condition, or as one component of Williams syndrome. SVAS is caused by translocations, gross deletions and point mutations that disrupt the elastin gene (ELN) on 7q11.23. Functional hemizygosity for elastin is known to be the cause of SVAS in patients with gross chromosomal abnormalities involving ELN. However, the pathogenic mechanisms of point mutations are less clear. One hundred patients with diagnosed SVAS and normal karyotypes were screened for mutations in the elastin gene to further elucidate the molecular pathology of the disorder. Mutations associated with the vascular disease were detected in 35 patients, and included nonsense, frameshift, translation initiation and splice site mutations. The four missense mutations identified are the first of this type to be associated with SVAS. Here we describe the spectrum of mutations occurring in familial and sporadic SVAS and attempt to define the mutational mechanisms involved in SVAS. SVAS shows variable penetrance within families but the progressive nature of the disorder in some cases, makes identification of the molecular lesions important for future preventative treatments.
    European Journal of HumanGenetics 01/2001; 8(12):955-63. DOI:10.1038/sj.ejhg.5200564 · 4.35 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

190 Citations
37.96 Total Impact Points


  • 2005
    • The University of Manchester
      Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2001
    • Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom