Maria Yudkevich

National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moskva, Moscow, Russia

Are you Maria Yudkevich?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)7.81 Total impact

  • Oleg Poldin, Diliara Valeeva, Maria Yudkevich
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among the key issues of peer effects estimation is the correct identification of relevant peers. In this study, we explore how the individual performance of university students is influenced by characteristics and achievements of peers from individual’s social network. The analysis uses data from two directed networks: a network of friends and a network of study partners for thirdyear students at a top-tier Russian university. Data on network ties in randomly formed student groups enables us to address the endogeneity problem and disentangle the influence of peers’ performance from the effect that a peer’s background has on students. We show that both the GPA of peers and their ability measures are significant in the estimated regression model. A onepoint increase in the average GPA of peers is associated with an increase in an individual student’s own GPA of approximately one fourth. The regression on the data from the network of study partners has slightly greater explanatory power than the analysis based on data from the network of friends. No effect from a student’s classmates is found in the model that assumes group interactions occur between group mates.
    01/2013;
  • Gregory Androushchak, Oleg Poldin, Maria Yudkevich
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We estimate the influence of classmates’ ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed university student groups. The study uses administrative data on undergraduate students at a large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has a significant positive effect on individual grades in key economics and mathematics courses as well as on overall academic performance. While a simple linear-in-means model reveals moderate peer effects, non-linear specifications give strong evidence that students at the top of the ability distribution derive the greatest benefit from high-ability classmates. Less able students are not affected by peers and have no significant influence on peers’ outcomes.
    Educational Studies 01/2013; 39(5). · 0.35 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: [This corrects the article on p. e46319 in vol. 7.].
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(3). · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is now well established that highly developed countries tend to score well on measures of social capital and have higher levels of generalized trust. In turn, the willingness to trust has been shown to be correlated with various social and environmental factors (e.g. institutions, culture) on one hand, and accumulated human capital on the other. To what extent is an individual’s trust driven by contemporaneous institutions and environmental conditions and to what extent is it determined by the individual’s human capital? We collect data from students in Moscow and Manila and use the variation in their height and gender to instrument for measures of their human capital to identify the causal effect of the latter on trust. We find that human capital positively affects the propensity to trust, and its contribution appears larger than the combined effect of other omitted variables including, plausibly, social and environmental factors.
    11/2012;
  • Gregory Androushchak, Oleg Poldin, Maria Yudkevich
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We estimate the influence of classmates ability characteristics on student achievement in exogenously formed student groups. The study uses the administrative data on undergraduate students in large selective university in Russia. The presence of high-ability classmates has positive effect on individual academic performance, and most benefit is gained by students at the top of the ability distribution. The increase in share of less able students influences individual grades insignificantly.
    03/2012;
  • Ilya Prakhov, Maria Yudkevich
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the impact of family income on the results of the Unified State Examination (the USE) and university choice in Russia. We argue that, even under the USE, which was introduced instead of high school exit exams and university-specific entrance exams, entrants from wealthy households still have an advantage in terms of access to higher education, since income positively affects USE scores through the channel of a higher level of investment in pre-entry coaching. Moreover, richer households make more effective decisions about university. We have found positive and significant relationships between the level of income and USE results for high school graduates, with an equal achievement before coaching. We subsequently propose that students from the most affluent households do invest more in additional types of preparation (pre-entry courses and individual lessons with tutors), and those extra classes provide a higher return for children from this particular income group. Finally, we show that holding the result of the USE equal, students with good and fair marks from wealthy families are admitted to universities with higher average USE score than those from poorer families. As a result, we can observe that income status is a factor that significantly influences enrollment to university.
    02/2012;
  • Source
    Maria Yudkevich, Elizaveta Sivak
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this paper we discuss positive and negative aspects of university inbreeding – a practice of hiring university graduates as members of its faculty. We provide a detailed review of empirical studies related to inbreeding and its consequences, especially for faculty effectiveness and career, in different education systems. We use data of a 2007 faculty survey of 28 Saint Petersburg public higher education institutions which have undergraduate programs in economics to describe a situation in Russian universities. We demonstrate that inbreeding has a significant impact on individual careers and value orientations of university faculty members.
    01/2012;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to prenatal androgens affects both future behavior and life choices. However, there is still relatively limited evidence on its effects on academic performance. Moreover, the predicted effect of exposure to prenatal testosterone (T)-which is inversely correlated with the relative length of the second to fourth finger lengths (2D:4D)-would seem to have ambiguous effects on academic achievement since traits like aggressiveness or risk-taking are not uniformly positive for success in school. We provide the first evidence of a non-linear, quadratic, relationship between 2D:4D and academic achievement using samples from Moscow and Manila. We also find that there is a gender differentiated link between various measures of academic achievement and measured digit ratios. These effects are different depending on the field of study, choice of achievement measure, and use of the right hand or left digit ratios. The results seem to be asymmetric between Moscow and Manila where the right (left) hand generates inverted-U (U-shaped) curves in Moscow while the pattern for hands reverses in Manila. Drawing from unusually large and detailed samples of university students in two countries not studied in the digit literature, our work is the first to have a large cross country comparison that includes two groups with very different ethnic compositions.
    PLoS ONE 01/2012; 7(10):e46319. · 3.73 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exposure to prenatal androgens affects both future behavior and life choices. However, there is still relatively limited evidence on its effects on academic performance. Moreover, the predicted effect of exposure to prenatal testosterone (T) - which is inversely correlated with the relative length of the second to fourth finger lengths (2D:4D) - would seem to have ambiguous effects on academic achievement since traits like confidence, aggressiveness, or risk-taking are not uniformly positive for success in school. We provide the first evidence of a non-linear relationship between 2D:4D and academic achievement using samples from Moscow and Manila. We find that there is a quadratic relationship between high T exposure and markers of achievement such as grades or test scores and that the optimum digit ratio for women in our sample is lower (indicating higher prenatal T) than the average. The results for men are generally insignificant for Moscow but significant for Manila showing similar non-linear effects. Our work is thus unusual in that it draws from a large sample of nearly a thousand university students in Moscow and over a hundred from Manila for whom we also have extensive information on high school test scores, family background and other potential correlates of achievement. Our work is also the first to have a large cross country comparison that includes two groups with very different ethnic compositions.
    10/2011;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We study hiring decisions made by competing universities in a simple dynamic framework, focusing on the structure of university finance. Universities with annual state-approved financing underinvest in high-quality faculty, while universities that receive a significant part of their annual income from (less volatile) returns on endowments hire fewer but better faculty and provide long-term contracts. If university financing is linked to the number of students, there is additional pressure to hire low-quality short-term staff. An increase in the university's budget might force the university to switch its priorities from 'research' to 'teaching' in equilibrium. We employ our model to discuss the necessity for state-financed endowments, and investigate the political economics of competition between universities, path-dependence in the development of the university system, and higher-education reform in emerging market economies
    10/2009;
  • Source
    Marina Dodlova, Maria Yudkevich
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Certain altruistic phenomena in the workplace that exceed the bounds of contract theory can be explained within the framework of gift exchange theory. We discuss the application of gift exchange theory to interactions between an employer and an employee as well as between employees themselves. We emphasize the opportunities of gifts to improve coordination and contract efficiency in the workplace and argue that there exists the productive function of gifts. We use the framework of a market for externalities in order to demonstrate that given the inter-related activities of agents a gift exchange between them can lead to Pareto improvement.
    Human Resource Management Review. 03/2009;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper examines the investment strategies of individual depositors in Russia. Basing on the results of the poll covering depositors of eight Moscow banks we study the depositors' decision-making processes in making choice of the bank, determining whether it is reliable, monitoring of this reliability and using the mechanisms of market discipline. We found the confirmation for market discipline hypothesis in terms of depositors' intentions: bank clients claim that the information about changes in bank's financial indicators they are ready to change their investment strategies. We found out that while the depositor's total funds in his or her bank grow the intensity of market discipline falls, but the propensity to monitor the reliability of the bank increases. The latter is also true when the share of insured deposits in total deposits decreases. The deposit insurance system added some confidence in bank reliability, but there is the significant proportion of depositors who do not believe in the guaranties provided by the system as well of those who have incorrect notion of DIS compensation mechanisms. However it is the depositors, for whom the deposit insurance coverage is not enough, who are the most likely to become the subjects of market discipline.
    02/2008;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We study hiring decisions made by competing universities in a dynamic framework, focusing on the structure of university finance. Universities with annual state-approved financing underinvest in high-quality faculty, while universities that receive a significant part of their annual income from returns on endowments hire fewer but better faculty and provide long-term contracts. If university financing is linked to the number of students, there is additional pressure to hire low-quality short-term staff. An increase in the universitys budget might force the university to switch its priorities from "research" to "teaching" in equilibrium. We employ our model to discuss the necessity for state-financed endowments, and investigate the political economics of competition between universities, path-dependence in the development of the university system, and higher-education reform in emerging market economies.
    VOPROSY ECONOMIKI. 01/2008; 12.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: (2007 Nobel Prize in Economics) The paper outlines the basics of the mechanism design theory and describes the defining contribution of Leo Hurwiñz, Eric Maskin, and Roger Myerson, the Nobel prize winners in economics in 2007. It starts by introducing the concepts of economic mechanism, incentive compatibility, and implementation, and provides a non-technical description of main results. Then it explains the relationship between theoretical foundations and real-world market mechanisms such as auctions. Finally, recent applications of the mechanism design theory to institutional analysis are discussed.
    VOPROSY ECONOMIKI. 01/2008; 1.
  • Source
    MARINA DODLOVA, MARIA YUDKEVICH

Publication Stats

5 Citations
7.81 Total Impact Points

Top Journals

Institutions

  • 2008–2013
    • National Research University Higher School of Economics
      • International Laboratory for Institutional Analysis of Economic Reforms (LIA)
      Moskva, Moscow, Russia
  • 2012
    • George Mason University
      • Department of Economics
      Fairfax, VA, United States
  • 2009
    • Université Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense
      Nanterre, Île-de-France, France