Daniela Frosini

Santa Chiara Hospital, Trient, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy

Are you Daniela Frosini?

Claim your profile

Publications (39)135.79 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Serotonergic system is believed to play a role in levodopa-induced-dyskinesias pathogenesis, and serotonin transporter has been evaluated as potential target.Aim of the studyTo retrospectively investigate the potential effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) during dopaminergic treatment, in the development of dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD).Methods One hundred and thirty-five consecutive patients with PD, with 10-year follow-up since diagnosis. Age at PD onset, duration of levodopa treatment, maximum daily dose, and SSRIs exposure were collected. Risk, latency, and severity of dyskinesias were evaluated comparing patients with and without SSRIs exposure.ResultsForty-nine patients received SSRIs for a variable period, 86 were never treated; no significant difference between the groups was observed (P = 0.897) in the prevalence of dyskinesias. Considering latency between PD diagnosis and dyskinesias onset, patients exposed to SSRIs developed dyskinesias later (6.48 ± 1.99 vs 5.70 ± 1.89 years, P = 0.020). The median dyskinesia severity score was 0 in the exposed group vs 1 in non-exposed patients (P = 0.025). Multivariate analysis demonstrated SSRIs exposure as the only independent predictor, protecting from severe dyskinesia.Conclusions Use of SSRIs in patients with PD did not protect from dyskinesias; however, exposure may delay the onset and reduce the severity, confirming modulation of the serotonergic system as possible antidyskinetic strategy.
    Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 09/2014; · 2.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An overactive striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission is described in psychosis and may be associated with a state of aberrant salience attribution. This pilot psychometric study investigated if features suggestive of an aberrant salience state, a condition of psychosis proneness, are associated with dopamine replacement therapy in patients with early Parkinson's disease (PD). 77 participants (50 medicated PD patients, 12 newly diagnosed drug-naive PD patients and 15 healthy controls) were enrolled and assessed with the Aberrant Salience Inventory (ASI). Differences between groups were found for ASI scores, and ASI scores correlated with the dopaminergic therapy, in particular levodopa. These findings preliminary suggested that the presence and the degree of an aberrant salience state may be associated with features of the dopaminergic therapy; further studies are needed to investigate which neuropsychiatric complications more common in PD patients may be characterized by an underlying aberrant salience state.
    07/2014;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To study patient tolerability of brain imaging that employs an ultrahigh field (7 T) MR system METHODS: We examined 180 subjects that underwent brain MR examination at 7 T. A tolerability test consisting of two parts (during patient table motion and during the examination) was administered to all subjects in order to monitor their discomfort. The scores range from 0 to 5 for the first part, and from 0 to 10 for the second part, the total score of each subject therefore ranging from 0 (no side effects reported) to 15 (lowest tolerability) RESULTS: A total of 51 % of subjects reported at least one side effect but all were mild in intensity and did not require examination interruption. No serious adverse event was reported. The total score (mean ± standard deviation) was 1.1 ± 1.5 out of 15 (mean score 0.4 ± 0.7 out of 5 during patient table motion and 0.7 ± 1.1 out of 10 during MR). Patient discomfort was not related to gender or health status, but it was reduced with time after system installation with increasing operator experience in performing UHF MR examinations. Ultrahigh field MRI is well tolerated without excessive discomfort to subjects. • 7-T MRI is well tolerated with low incidence of side effects • The subjects' discomfort during 7-T MRI is reduced as the operators' experience increases • 7-T MRI is practicable in healthy subjects and patients with neurodegenerative diseases.
    European Radiology 05/2014; · 4.34 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose To evaluate the anatomy of the substantia nigra (SN) in healthy subjects by performing 7-T magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the SN, and to prospectively define the accuracy of 7-T MR imaging in distinguishing Parkinson disease (PD) patients from healthy subjects on an individual basis. Materials and Methods The 7-T MR imaging protocol was approved by the Italian Ministry of Health and by the local competent ethics committee. SN anatomy was described ex vivo on a gross brain specimen by using highly resolved proton-density (spin-echo proton density) and gradient-recalled-echo (GRE) images, and in vivo in eight healthy subjects (mean age, 40.1 years) by using GRE three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted images. After training on appearance of SN in eight healthy subjects, the SN anatomy was evaluated twice by two blinded observers in 13 healthy subjects (mean age, 54.7 years) and in 17 PD patients (mean age, 56.9 years). Deviations from normal SN appearance were described and indicated as abnormal, and both diagnostic accuracy and intra- and interobserver agreement for diagnosis of PD with 7-T MR imaging were calculated. Results Three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted 7-T MR imaging reveals a three-layered organization of the SN allowing readers to distinguish pars compacta ventralis and dorsalis from pars reticulata. The abnormal architecture of the SN allowed a discrimination between PD patients and healthy subjects with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 96.2% (range, 92.3%-100%), respectively. Intraobserver agreement (κ = 1) and interobserver agreement (κ = 0.932) were excellent. Conclusion MR imaging at 7-T allows a precise characterization of the SN and visualization of its inner organization. Three-dimensional multiecho susceptibility-weighted images can be used to accurately differentiate healthy subjects from PD patients, which provides a novel diagnostic opportunity. © RSNA, 2014.
    Radiology 02/2014; · 6.34 Impact Factor
  • Neurological Sciences 02/2014; · 1.41 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Similarly to subjects with degenerative parkinsonism, (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT has been reported either normal or abnormal in patients with drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP), challenging the notion that parkinsonism might be entirely due to post-synaptic D2-receptors blockade by antipsychotic drugs. In a previous multicenter cross-sectional study conducted on a large sample of patients with schizophrenia, we identified 97 patients who developed parkinsonism with a similar bi-modal distribution of DAT-SPECT. In this longitudinal study, we reported clinical and imaging features associated with progression of motor disability over 2-year follow-up in 60 out of those 97 patients with schizophrenia and parkinsonism who underwent (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT at baseline evaluation (normal SPECT=33; abnormal SPECT=27). As second end-point, chronic response to levodopa over a 3-month period was tested in a subgroup of subjects. Motor Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) at follow-up significantly increased in patients with abnormal SPECT. Specifically, a 6-point worsening was demonstrated in 18.5% of the subjects with abnormal SPECT and in none of the subjects with normal SPECT. Levodopa treatment improved motor UPDRS only in the group with abnormal SPECT. After adjustment for possible confounders, linear regression analysis demonstrated that abnormal SPECT findings at baseline were the only predictor of motor disability progression and of better outcome of levodopa treatment. Our results support the notion that a degenerative disease might underlie parkinsonism in a minority of schizophrenic patients chronically exposed to antipsychotics. Functional imaging of the dopamine transporter can be helpful to select this patient sub-group that might benefit from levodopa therapy.
    Schizophrenia Research 12/2013; · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the risk of neuropathy in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and to evaluate the role of levodopa exposure as a potential risk factor. A multicenter study of 330 patients with PD and 137 healthy controls with a comparable age distribution was performed. With respect to levodopa exposure, 144 patients had long exposure (≥3 years) to levodopa (LELD), 103 patients had short exposure (<3 years) to levodopa (SELD), and 83 patients had no exposure to levodopa (NOLD). Nerve function was evaluated using the reduced total neuropathy score. Right sural sensory antidromic and peroneal motor nerve conduction studies were performed by neurophysiologists who were blinded to the existence of neuropathy clinical features or PD treatment. Overall, 19.40% of patients in the LELD group, 6.80% in the SELD group, 4.82% in the NOLD group, and 8.76% in the control group were diagnosed with neuropathy (axonal, predominantly sensory). Multivariate logistic analysis indicated that the risk of neuropathy was not influenced by disease duration, severity, or sex. The risk of neuropathy increased by approximately 8% for each year of age (P < 0.001; odds ratio [OR], 1.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.037-1.128). The risk of neuropathy was 2.38 higher in the LELD group than in the control group (P = 0.022; OR, 2.38; 95% CI, 1.130-5.014). In a comparison between patients with and without neuropathy (Student's t test), the levodopa dose was higher (P < 0.0001), serum vitamin B12 levels were lower (P = 0.0102), and homocysteine levels were higher (P < 0.001) in the patients with neuropathy. Our results demonstrate that the duration of exposure to levodopa, along with age, is the main risk factor for the development of neuropathy. Screening for homocysteine and vitamin B12 levels and clinical-neurophysiological monitoring for neuropathy may be advisable in patients with PD who are receiving treatment with levodopa. © 2013 Movement Disorder Society.
    Movement Disorders 07/2013; · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The side of motor symptom predominance may influence cognitive performance in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD): PD patients with right-side motor symptom predominance typically present difficulties in tasks of language and verbal memory, whereas PD patients with left-side motor symptom predominance typically present difficulties in visuospatial tasks. The current study aimed at investigating the relationship between motor symptom lateralization and cognitive performance in PD patients without the possible confounding effect of dopaminergic drugs, which may enhance or impair cognition on the basis of assessed function and disease stage. From the initial sample of 137 consecutive newly diagnosed drug-naïve (de novo) PD patients, clinical follow-ups and neurological examinations identified 108 right-handed patients with a unilateral motor presentation or a clear motor asymmetry (59 right-PD: 54.6%; 49 left-PD: 45.4%). Any cognitive difference emerged between right-PD patients and left-PD patients at this disease stage. Scores of lateralized motor impairment severity correlated with some cognitive performances: Right motor impairment correlated with a measure of set shifting (Trail Making Test B-A), and left motor impairment correlated with phonemic fluency and tasks with visuospatial material (Colored Progressive Matrices of Raven, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Copy and Immediate Recall). Findings of the current study supported the conclusion that the side of clinical motor predominance scarcely influences cognition in the early untreated stages of PD, suggesting that cognitive differences between subgroups of lateralized PD patients probably may appear in more advanced disease stages.
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 12/2012; · 2.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Schizophrenia Research 12/2012; 142(s 1–3):251. · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Movement Disorders 11/2012; 27(13):1706. · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The investigation of the relationship between affective symptoms and dopamine transporter (DAT) density provided conflicting data in both Parkinson's Disease (PD) and non-PD patients. However, the potential interference of psychoactive as well as anti-parkinsonian drugs on DAT density should be taken into account. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between affective symptoms and pre-synaptic dopaminergic function in de novo PD patients. METHODS: Forty-four de novo PD consecutive outpatients were recruited, and the severity of anxious symptoms was evaluated with the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A), the severity of depressive symptoms with the Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Six patients had a formal diagnosis of depression. All patients performed (123) I-FP-CIT SPECT, and semi-quantitative striatal indices were calculated. RESULTS: Disease severity, as measured by Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRSIII), was inversely correlated with bilateral striatal indices. Bilateral striatal uptake was significantly positively correlated with HAM-D (r.329; r.423, respectively, right and left), BDI (r.377; r.360, respectively, right and left) and HAM-A (r.338; r.340, respectively, right and left). After controlling for age, disease duration and severity, and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), no significant reduction in r-values was observed (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Our data support the existence of a relationship between depressive and anxious symptoms and the striatal 123-FP-CIT uptake. The finding of an increased DAT density associated with mild affective symptoms could be due to the lack of compensatory mechanisms usually present in early PD, and/or it might have a pathogenic role in affective symptoms by reducing the dopaminergic tone in the synaptic cleft.
    European Journal of Neurology 10/2012; · 4.16 Impact Factor
  • Source
    The Journal of neuropsychiatry and clinical neurosciences 09/2012; 24(4):E36-7. · 2.34 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Drug-induced parkinsonism (DIP) in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs is considered a form of post-synaptic parkinsonism, caused by D2-receptor blockade. Recent studies, however, carried out on small and heterogeneous patient samples, have shown that DIP may be associated with [(123)I]FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) abnormalities, which are markers of dopamine nigrostriatal terminal defect. In the present study, outpatients fulfilling the DSM-IV criteria for schizophrenia and treated with antipsychotics for at least 6 months, were enrolled in order to estimate the prevalence of DIP and, among patients with DIP, the prevalence of [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT abnormalities. Socio-demographic and clinical variables associated with the presence of DIP and SPECT abnormalities were also assessed. DIP was diagnosed in 149 out of 448 patients with schizophrenia (33%). Age, use of long-acting antipsychotics and a positive family history of parkinsonism were the only demographic variables significantly associated with the development of DIP. Neuroimaging abnormalities were found in 41 of 97 patients who agreed to undergo [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT (42%). Only age differentiated this group of patients from those with normal imaging. These preliminary findings suggest that D2-receptor blockade may coexist with a dopamine nigrostriatal terminal defect, as assessed by [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT abnormalities, in a relevant proportion of DIP patients. Longitudinal studies should be designed with the aim of improving our understanding of the mechanisms of pre-synaptic abnormalities in DIP patients and identifying specific treatment strategies.
    Schizophrenia Research 06/2012; 139(1-3):40-5. · 4.59 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The search for biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (PD) is crucial to identify the disease early and monitor the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapies. We aim to assess whether a gene signature could be detected in blood from early/mild PD patients that could support the diagnosis of early PD, focusing on genes found particularly altered in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD. The transcriptional expression of seven selected genes was examined in blood samples from 62 early stage PD patients and 64 healthy age-matched controls. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis identified five genes as optimal predictors of PD: p19 S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (odds ratio [OR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60-0.90), huntingtin interacting protein-2 (OR 1.32; CI 1.08-1.61), aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 subfamily A1 (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.75-0.99), 19 S proteasomal protein PSMC4 (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60-0.89) and heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.14-1.70). At a 0.5 cut-off the gene panel yielded a sensitivity and specificity in detecting PD of 90.3 and 89.1 respectively and the area under the receiving operating curve (ROC AUC) was 0.96. The performance of the five-gene classifier on the de novo PD individuals alone composing the early PD cohort (n = 38), resulted in a similar ROC with an AUC of 0.95, indicating the stability of the model and also, that patient medication had no significant effect on the predictive probability (PP) of the classifier for PD risk. The predictive ability of the model was validated in an independent cohort of 30 patients at advanced stage of PD, classifying correctly all cases as PD (100% sensitivity). Notably, the nominal average value of the PP for PD (0.95 (SD = 0.09)) in this cohort was higher than that of the early PD group (0.83 (SD = 0.22)), suggesting a potential for the model to assess disease severity. Lastly, the gene panel fully discriminated between PD and Alzheimer's disease (n = 29). The findings provide evidence on the ability of a five-gene panel to diagnose early/mild PD, with a possible diagnostic value for detection of asymptomatic PD before overt expression of the disorder.
    Molecular Neurodegeneration 05/2012; 7:26. · 4.01 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: (1) To establish the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) in newly diagnosed drug-naive patients with Parkinson's disease adopting recently proposed and more conservative preliminary research criteria. (2) To investigate the relation between cognitive performances, MCI and motor dysfunction. 132 consecutive newly diagnosed drug-naive PD patients and 100 healthy controls (HCs) underwent a neuropsychological evaluation covering different cognitive domains. Moreover, on the basis of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale II/III, different motor scores were calculated and patients were classified in motor subtypes. 11 patients were excluded from the analysis during clinical follow-up which was continued at least 3 years from the diagnosis; therefore, the final sample included 121 patients. MCI prevalence was higher in PD (14.8%) patients than in HCs (7.0%). PD patients reported lower cognitive performances than HCs in several cognitive domains; HCs also outperformed cognitively preserved PD patients in tasks of episodic verbal memory and in a screening task of executive functions. MCI-PD patients presented a more severe bradykinesia score than non-MCI PD patients and patients mainly characterised by tremor had better performances in some cognitive domains, and specific cognitive-motor relationships emerged. Although the adoption of more conservative diagnostic criteria identified a lower MCI prevalence, we found evidence that newly diagnosed drug-naive PD patients present a higher risk of MCI in comparison with HCs. Axial symptoms and bradykinesia represent risk factors for MCI in PD patients and a classification of PD patients that highlights the presence/absence of tremor, as proposed in this study, is probably better tailored for the early stages of PD than classifications proposed for more advanced PD stages.
    Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry 04/2012; 83(6):601-6. · 4.87 Impact Factor
  • Source
    Movement Disorders 02/2012; 27(2):331-2. · 5.63 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present study investigated memory for intention in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) who were newly diagnosed and not yet treated to avoid the effect of therapy as a potential confounding variable. A comprehensive neuropsychological battery and an event-based prospective memory task were administered to 41 subjects with de novo PD and 40 control subjects. Separate scores were computed for correct execution of intended action (prospective component) and recall of intention (retrospective component). PD patients performed marginally worse (p = .053) than controls on the prospective component of the task. On the other hand, the performance of the two groups was comparable for the retrospective component. Neuropsychological findings revealed lower performance of the PD group in episodic memory and in some measures of executive functions. These results suggested a subtle prospective memory dysfunction present at the initial stage of PD, which may be related to disruption of fronto-striatal circuitry.
    Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society 11/2011; 17(6):1158-62. · 2.70 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how alexithymia may influence decision making under conditions of uncertainty, assessed using the Iowa Gambling Task, in patients with newly diagnosed, untreated (de novo) Parkinson's disease, as previously reported for healthy subjects. Twenty-four patients with de novo Parkinson's disease underwent a neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric assessment, including the Toronto Alexithymia Scale, the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form, and the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The assessment showed that 12 patients were alexithymic and 12 were non-alexithymic; seven patients were found to be mildly depressed and 17 non-depressed. Alexithymic and non-alexithymic patients did not differ in the IGT total score; however, significant differences emerged across the third block of the IGT, in which the alexithymic patients outperformed the nonalexithymic patients. Depression did not influence IGT performance. Alexithymia may modulate decision making, as assessed with the IGT; alexithymia could be associated with faster learning to avoid risky choices and negative feedback, as previously reported in some studies conducted in anxious or depressed patients.
    Functional neurology 07/2011; 26(3):127-31. · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To investigate dopaminergic function in a large cohort of patients with corticobasal syndrome (CBS) and describe its relationship with clinical features in comparison to Parkinson's disease and healthy control subjects. In addition, we assessed prevalence and features of individuals with CBS and in vivo evidence of preserved nigral neuronal density. Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) neuronal degeneration is a mandatory pathological criterion for definite corticobasal degeneration, though sporadic autopsy-proven cases with ante-mortem imaging evidence of preserved nigral terminals have been recently described. In this multicenter study, we investigated presynaptic nigrostriatal function in 36 outpatients fulfilling clinical criteria for "probable corticobasal degeneration" (age 71±7.3 years; disease duration 3.9±1.6 years), 37 PD and 24 healthy control subjects using FP-CIT single photon emission computed tomography. Clinical, neuropsychological, and magnetic resonance imaging assessment was performed to characterize CBS patients. Linear discriminant analysis was used to categorize normal vs. pathological scans. FP-CIT binding reduction in patients with CBS was characterized by larger variability, more uniform reduction throughout the striatum and greater hemispheric asymmetry compared to PD. Moreover, there was no significant correlation between tracer uptake values and clinical features such as disease duration and severity. Despite all CBS subjects showed obvious bilateral extrapyramidal signs, FP-CIT uptake was found to be normal bilaterally in four CBS patients and only unilaterally in other four cases. Extensive clinical, neuropsychological and imaging assessment did not reveal remarkable differences between CBS subjects with normal vs. pathological FP-CIT uptake. Our findings support the hypothesis that extrapyramidal motor symptoms in CBS are not invariably associated with SNc neuronal degeneration and that supranigral factors may play a major role in several cases. CBS individuals with normal FP-CIT uptake do not show any clinical or cognitive feature suggesting a different pathology than CBD.
    PLoS ONE 01/2011; 6(5):e18301. · 3.53 Impact Factor
  • Alzheimers & Dementia - ALZHEIMERS DEMENT. 01/2011; 7(4).

Publication Stats

260 Citations
135.79 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Santa Chiara Hospital
      Trient, Trentino-Alto Adige, Italy
  • 1970–2013
    • Università di Pisa
      • Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
      Pisa, Tuscany, Italy
  • 2012
    • University of Verona
      • Department of Morphological-Biomedical Sciences
      Verona, Veneto, Italy
  • 2011
    • Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento
      Milano, Lombardy, Italy