Kumi Hidaka

Kyoto University, Kioto, Kyōto, Japan

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Publications (44)383.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In nucleic acid nanotechnology, designed RNA molecules are widely explored because of their usability originating from RNA’s structural and functional diversity. Herein, a method to design and prepare RNA nanostructures by employing DNA origami strategy was developed. A single-stranded RNA scaffold and staple RNA strands were used for the formation of RNA nanostructures. After the annealing of the mixtures, 7-helix bundled RNA tile and 6-helix bundled RNA tube structures were observed as predesigned shapes. These nanostructures were easily functionalized by introducing chemical modification to the RNA scaffolds. The DNA origami method is extended and utilized to construct RNA nanostructures.
    Chemistry - A European Journal 11/2014; 20(47):15330-15333. · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A photofunctionalized square bipyramidal DNA nanocapsule (NC) was designed and prepared for the creation of a nanomaterial carrier. Photocontrollable open/close system and toehold system were introduced into the NC for the inclusion and release of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) by photoirradiation and strand displacement. The reversible open and closed states were examined by gel electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the open behavior was directly observed by high-speed AFM. The encapsulation of the DNA-modified AuNP within the NC was carried out by hybridization of a specific DNA strand (capture strand), and the release of the AuNP was examined by addition of toehold-containing complementary DNA strand (release strand). The release of the AuNP from the NC was achieved by the opening of the NC and subsequent strand displacement.
    Chemistry - A European Journal 11/2014; 20(46):14951-14954. · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    Angewandte Chemie 07/2014; 126(31).
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    ABSTRACT: Molecular machines composed of RNA-protein (RNP) complexes may expand the fields of molecular robotics, nanomedicine, and synthetic biology. However, constructing and directly visualizing a functional RNP nanostructure to detect and control living cell function remains a challenge. Here we show that RNP nanostructures with modular functions can be designed and visualized at single-RNP interaction resolution. The RNP structural images collected in solution through high-speed atomic force microscopy showed that a single RNP interaction induces a conformational change in the RNA scaffold, which supports the nanostructure formation designed. The specific RNP interaction also improved RNA nanostructure stability in a serum-containing buffer. We developed and visualized functional RNPs (e.g., to detect human cancer cells or knockdown target genes) by attaching a protein or RNA module to the same RNA scaffold at an optimal size. The synthetic RNP architecture may provide alternative materials to detect and control functions in target mammalian cells.
    ACS Nano 07/2014; 8(8):8130–8140. · 12.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We developed a novel method to design various helical tubular structures using the DNA origami method. The size-controlled tubular structures which have 192, 256, and 320 base pairs for one turn of the tube were designed and prepared. We observed the formation of the expected short tubes and unexpected long ones. Detailed analyses of the surface patterns of the tubes showed that the short tubes had mainly a left-handed helical structure. The long tubes mainly formed a right-handed helical structure and extended to the directions of the double helical axes as structural isomers of the short tubes. The folding pathways of the tubes were estimated by analyzing the proportions of short and long tubes obtained at different annealing conditions. Depending on the number of base pairs involved in one turn of the tube, the population of left-/right-handed and short/long tubes changed. The bending stress caused by the stiffness of the bundled double helices and the non-natural helical pitch determine the structural variety of the tubes.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition in English 07/2014; 53(29):7484-90. · 13.45 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Controllable fabrication of DNA origami structures was achieved using cationic comb-type copolymers (CCCs) as locks and polyvinyl sulphonic acid (PVS) as a key. A CCC binds to the phosphate backbone of either M13mp18/staples alone or both together and restricts origami folding, while PVS unlocks the CCC, restoring the formation of origami structures.
    Chemical Communications 06/2014; 50(63):8743-8746. · 6.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: While single-molecule sensing offers the ultimate detection limit, its throughput is often restricted as sensing events are carried out one at a time in most cases. 2D and 3D DNA origami nanostructures are used as expanded single-molecule platforms in a new mechanochemical sensing strategy. As a proof of concept, six sensing probes are incorporated in a 7-tile DNA origami nanoassembly, wherein binding of a target molecule to any of these probes leads to mechanochemical rearrangement of the origami nanostructure, which is monitored in real time by optical tweezers. Using these platforms, 10 pM platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are detected within 10 minutes, while demonstrating multiplex sensing of the PDGF and a target DNA in the same solution. By tapping into the rapid development of versatile DNA origami nanostructures, this mechanochemical platform is anticipated to offer a long sought solution for single-molecule sensing with improved throughput.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 05/2014; 53(31):8137-8141. · 11.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We developed a novel method to design various helical tubular structures using the DNA origami method. The size-controlled tubular structures which have 192, 256, and 320 base pairs for one turn of the tube were designed and prepared. We observed the formation of the expected short tubes and unexpected long ones. Detailed analyses of the surface patterns of the tubes showed that the short tubes had mainly a lefthanded helical structure. The long tubes mainly formed a righthanded helical structure and extended to the directions of the double helical axes as structural isomers of the short tubes. The folding pathways of the tubes were estimated by analyzing the proportions of short and long tubes obtained at different annealing conditions. Depending on the number of base pairs involved in one turn of the tube, the population of left-/righthanded and short/long tubes changed. The bending stress caused by the stiffness of the bundled double helices and the non-natural helical pitch determine the structural variety of the tubes.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 05/2014; 53(29):7484-7490. · 11.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the direct and single-molecule visualization of the in-pathway intermediates of the G-quadruplex folding that have been inaccessible by any experimental method employed to date. Using DNA origami as a novel tool for the structural control and high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) for direct visualization, we captured images of the unprecedented solution-state structures of a tetramolecular antiparallel and (3+1)-type G-quadruplex intermediates, such as G-hairpin and G-triplex, with nanometer precision. No such structural information was reported previously with any direct or indirect technique, solution or solid-state, single-molecule or bulk studies, and at any resolution. Based on our results, we proposed a folding mechanism of these G-quadruplexes.
    Angewandte Chemie International Edition 04/2014; 53(16):4107–4112. · 11.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report the use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study Sox2-Pax6 complex formation on the DC5 DNA element at a single molecule level. Using an origami DNA scaffold containing two DNA strands with different levels of tensile force, we confirmed that DNA bending is necessary for Sox2 binding. We also demonstrated that two transcription factors bind cooperatively by observing the increased occupancy of Sox2-Pax6 on the DNA element compared to that of Sox2 alone.
    Nano Letters 03/2014; 14(5):2286-2292. · 13.03 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To create a nanoscale dual switch, two responsive DNA motifs, azobenzene-modified DNAs and G-telomeric repeat sequences, were introduced together into the nanoframe system. The dual-switching behaviors controlled by photoirradiation and K(+) were successfully visualized in real time by high-speed atomic force microscopy.
    Chemical Communications 03/2014; 50(32):4211-4213. · 6.38 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Among the approaches for DNA-based drug targeting, G-quadruplex-binding ligands are of particular interest because of high abundance of G-rich sequences in regions such as human chromosomal telomeres and promoters of several proto-oncogenes. Number of quadruplex-ligands has been reported, but their functions at single-molecule level have not been explored using direct and real-time methods. Here, we report on the direct observation of the formation of a four-stranded G-quadruplex induced by bisquinolinium pyridine dicarboxamide with a linker containing biotin at one end. We fabricated a DNA origami frame with incorporated duplex DNAs that contained 3-6 G–G mismatches in the middle. In the absence of ligand, the duplex DNAs of interest had no interaction, as visualized by their parallel-shape in high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) image. Presence of ligand induced the formation of G-quadruplex structure, which was characterized by an X-shape. Addition of streptavidin to the ligand-induced quadruplex caused the protein to localize in the middle of X-shape, indicating that the ligand is bound to the quadruplex. A sequence of real-time images of the ligand-induced formation of a quadruplex and its reverse conformational switching by removing the ligand was captured by HS-AFM. Unprecedented intermediate-like states were recorded in our real-time analysis.
    RSC Advances 12/2013; 4:6346–6355. · 3.71 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Site-specific recombination involves reciprocal exchange between defined DNA sites. The reaction initiates from the formation of a recombinase-DNA synaptic complex, in which two recombination sites arrange in an appropriate configuration. However, there is incomplete information about how the topological state of the substrate influences the synapsis and outcome of the reaction. Here, we show that Cre-mediated recombination can be regulated by controlling the orientation and topology of the loxP substrate in a DNA frame nanoscaffold. High-speed atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses revealed that the loxP-containing substrate strands in the antiparallel orientation can be recombined only through formation of synaptic complexes. By tethering HJ intermediates to DNA frames in different connection patterns and using them as a starting substrate, we found that the topological state of the HJ intermediates dictates the outcome of the resolution. Our approach should provide a new platform for structural-functional studies of various DNA targeting enzymes, especially which require formation of synaptic complexes.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 12/2013; 136(1):211-218. · 10.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: HIV-1 nucleocapsid proteins (NCps) facilitate remodeling of nucleic acids to fold thermodynamically stable conformations, and thus called nucleic acid chaperones. To date only little is known on the stoichiometry, NCp-NCp interactions, chaperone activity on G-quadruplex formation, and so on. We report here the direct and real-time analysis on such properties of proteolytic intermediate NCp15 and mature NCp7 using DNA origami. The protein particles were found to predominantly exist in monomeric form, while dimeric and multimeric forms were also observed both in free solution and bound to the quadruplex structure. The formation and the dissociation events of the G-quadruplexes were well documented in real-time and the intermediate-like states were also visualized. We anticipate that this pioneering study will strengthen our understanding on the chaperone activity of HIV-1 proteins which in turn will be helpful for the drug design based on G-quadruplex and also for the development of drugs against AIDS.
    Journal of the American Chemical Society 11/2013; 135(49):18575-18585. · 10.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: B-Z transition: A constrained and rotatable double-stranded DNA, in which the rotational freedom was controlled by its placement into a DNA nanoscaffold, was designed. The Z α β protein bound preferentially to the rotatable strand rather than the constrained strand, even using the same CG sequence.
    Chemistry - A European Journal 11/2013; 19(50):16887-16890. · 5.93 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Guanine-rich oligonucleotides often show a strong tendency to form supramolecular architecture, the so-called G-quadruplex structure. Because of the biological significance, it is now considered to be one of the most important conformations of DNA. Here, we describe the direct visualization and single-molecule analysis of the formation of a tetramolecular G-quadruplex in KCl solution. The conformational changes were carried out by incorporating two duplex DNAs, with G-G mismatch repeats in the middle, inside a DNA origami frame and monitoring the topology change of the strands. In the absence of KCl, incorporated duplexes had no interaction and laid parallel to each other. Addition of KCl induced the formation of a G-quadruplex structure by stably binding the duplexes to each other in the middle. Such a quadruplex formation allowed the DNA synapsis without disturbing the duplex regions of the participating sequences, and resulted in an X-shaped structure that was monitored by atomic force microscopy. Further, the G-quadruplex formation in KCl solution and its disruption in KCl-free buffer were analyzed in real-time. The orientation of the G-quadruplex is often difficult to control and investigate using traditional biochemical methods. However, our method using DNA origami could successfully control the strand orientations, topology and stoichiometry of the G-quadruplex.
    Nucleic Acids Research 07/2013; 41(18):8738-8747. · 8.81 Impact Factor
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    Dataset: c2cc37257f
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    ABSTRACT: Using the RNA transcript as a template, RNA-templated DNA origami structures were constructed by annealing with designed DNA staple strands. RNA-templated DNA origami structures were folded to form seven-helix bundled rectangular structures and six-helix bundled tubular structures. The chemically modified RNA-DNA hybrid origami structures were prepared by using RNA templates containing modified uracils.
    Chemical Communications 02/2013; 49(28):2879-81. · 6.38 Impact Factor