A. M. Cook

University of British Columbia - Vancouver, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

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Publications (2)7.54 Total impact

  • Source
    A. M. Cook, M. M. Vazifeh, M. Franz
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    ABSTRACT: It has been shown previously that a finite-length topological insulator nanowire, proximity-coupled to an ordinary bulk s-wave superconductor and subject to a longitudinal applied magnetic field, realizes a one-dimensional topological superconductor with an unpaired Majorana fermion (MF) localized at each end of the nanowire. Here, we study the stability of these MFs with respect to various perturbations that are likely to occur in a physical realization of the proposed device. We show that the unpaired Majorana fermions persist in this system for any value of the chemical potential inside the bulk band gap of order 300 meV in Bi$_2$Se$_3$ by computing the Majorana number. From this calculation, we also show that the unpaired Majorana fermions persist when the magnetic flux through the nanowire cross-section deviates significantly from half flux quantum. Lastly, we demonstrate that the unpaired Majorana fermions persist in strongly disordered wires with fluctuations in the on-site potential ranging in magnitude up to several times the size of the bulk band gap. These results suggest this solid-state system should exhibit unpaired Majorana fermions under accessible conditions likely important for experimental study or future applications.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 06/2012; 86(15). · 3.66 Impact Factor
  • Source
    A. Cook, M. Franz
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A finite-length topological-insulator nanowire, proximity-coupled to an ordinary bulk s-wave superconductor and subject to a longitudinal applied magnetic field, is shown to realize a one-dimensional topological superconductor with unpaired Majorana fermions localized at both ends. This situation occurs under a wide range of conditions and constitutes an easily accessible physical realization of the elusive Majorana particle in a solid-state system.
    Physical review. B, Condensed matter 10/2011; 84(20):201105. · 3.66 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1 Citation
7.54 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2012
    • University of British Columbia - Vancouver
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada