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Publications (4)7.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This article presents results of a study examining what happens to children when domestic violence is committed against their mothers. While many investigations have pointed to child exposure to violence in homes where women are battered, few have examined direct reports about what happens to children when adult domestic violence occurs. This study collected direct reports from mothers on real-life events and was designed to go beyond earlier research by eliciting information on a larger array of family and contextual factors that may account for variation in mother’s and their children’s direct and indirect exposure to violence within the same home. Anonymous telephone interviews with 111 battered mothers in four metropolitan areas across the United States elicited detailed information from women on the violence against them and their children. Findings confirm the seriousness of co-occurring mother and child exposure to violence. The research also revealed that women and children were often injured while trying to protect each other from the abuser. The article concludes by recommending further enhancing collaboration between child protection and battered women’s services; augmenting prevention and early intervention services to families experiencing adult domestic violence; and focusing on protecting and increasing the safety of both children and their battered mothers.
    Journal of Family Violence 01/2007; 22(5):309-317. · 1.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: There is limited research available on children's involvement in incidents of adult domestic violence. This study collected direct reports on real-life events and went beyond earlier research by eliciting information on a larger array of family and contextual factors that may account for variation in children's responses. Anonymous telephone interviews with 114 battered mothers in four metropolitan areas elicited detailed information from women on their children's responses to the violence being committed against the mothers. One quarter of the mothers reported that their children were physically involved in the events. In addition, mothers with less stable financial, social, and living situations at the time of the interview reported their children to have intervened more during the past violent incidents. The article concludes with recommendations for a greater emphasis on careful assessment of children's involvement in domestic violence incidents and on assisting mothers to achieve economic stability as well as safety.
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 01/2003; 18(1):18-32. · 1.64 Impact Factor
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    SANDRA K. BEEMAN, ANNELIES K. HAGEMEISTER, JEFFREY L. EDLESON
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    ABSTRACT: Professional attention to families experiencing both child maltreatment and woman battering has increased in recent years. This study examined data for 172 families—95 families for which police had filed child abuse incident reports and adult domestic assault incident reports, and 77 other families for which police had filed child maltreatment reports but had no documentation of domestic assaults. Exploring differences between the two groups of families, the authors found that dual-violence families were more likely to include an unrelated male in the household, to involve a neglect allegation, and to include perpetrator substance abuse. Child protection workers assessed dual-violence families to be at higher risk and were more likely to open the case for child protection services. Among open cases, however, dual-violence families received fewer services but were more likely to be referred to the county attorney. These findings and their implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed.
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 01/2001; 16(5):437-458. · 1.64 Impact Factor
  • Sandra K. Beeman, Annelies K. Hagemeister, Jeffrey L. Edleson
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    ABSTRACT: The past three decades have witnessed a rapid expansion of programs for abused children and for battered women. Despite evidence that child maltreatment and woman battering often occur in the same families, these service sectors mostly operate independently of each other and are sometimes in conflict. There are scant data available on either the current practices of child protection workers and battered women's advocates in these cases or on the varying perspectives that bring them to conflict or collaboration. This article reports the results of an effort to systematically probe the practices and views of these two groups of workers in an effort to pinpoint ways in which current practices might evolve toward greater cooperation. Six focus group interviews involving 23 child protection workers and battered women's advocates were conducted. This article describes our methodology and results and concludes with a discussion of the future potential for resolving outstanding issues so that closer collaboration might develop.
    Child Maltreatment 01/1999; 4(2):116-126. · 2.77 Impact Factor