Sandra J. Benyi

United States Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D. C., DC, United States

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Publications (9)8.33 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Often when various estuarine benthic indices disagree in their assessments of benthic condition, they are reflecting different aspects of benthic condition. We describe a process to screen indices for associations and, after identifying candidate metrics, evaluate metrics individually against the indices. We utilize radar plots as a multi-metric visualization tool, and conditional probability plots and receiver operating characteristic curves to evaluate associations seen in the plots. We investigated differences in two indices, the US EPA Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's benthic index for the Virginian Province and the New York Harbor benthic index of biotic integrity using data collected in New York Harbor and evaluated overall agreement of the indices and associations between each index and measures of habitat and sediment contamination. The indices agreed in approximately 78% of the cases. The New York Harbor benthic index of biotic integrity showed stronger associations with sediment metal contamination and grain size.
    Marine Pollution Bulletin 01/2009; 59(1-3):65-71. · 2.53 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Monitoring of indicators of the ecological condition of bays, tidal rivers, and estuaries within the Virginian Biogeographic Province (Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Cape Henry, Virginia) was conducted annually by the U.S. EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) during the summer months of 1990 to 1993. Data were collected at 425 probability-based stations within the Province. Indicators monitored included water quality (temperature, salinity, water clarity, and dissolved oxygen concentration), sediment contamination, sediment toxicity, benthic community structure, fish community structure, and fish gross external pathology. Data were used to estimate the current status of the ecological condition of Virginian Province estuarine resources, and provide a baseline for identifying possible future changes. Estimates, with 95% confidence limits, of the areal extent of impacted resources within the Province are provided. Data are also presented by estuarine class (large estuaries, small estuarine systems, and large tidal rivers). Results show that, overall, approximately half of the estuarine waters of the Virginian Province can be classified as impacted based on multiple indicators, with hypoxia being the major stressor.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 01/1999; 56(1). · 1.59 Impact Factor
  • Sandra J. Benyi, Charles J. Strobel
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    ABSTRACT: Data from the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) from 1990 to 1993 were used to assess the condition of the Long Island Sound (LIS) estuary. Ambient water, sediment and biota were collected during the summer months from 53 LIS stations using an unbiased sampling design. The design consists of two LIS subunits, LIS proper, and small estuaries (
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment - ENVIRON MONIT ASSESS. 01/1999; 56(1):27-49.
  • Henry W. Buffum, Sandra J. Benyi, John F. Paul
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    ABSTRACT: Monitoring of indicators of the ecological condition of bays, tidal rivers, and estuaries within the Virginian Biogeographic Province (Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Cape Henry, Virginia) was conducted annually by the U.S. EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) during the summer months of 1990 to 1993. Data were collected at 425 probability-based stations within the Province. Indicators monitored included water quality (temperature, salinity, water clarity, and dissolved oxygen concentration), sediment contamination, sediment toxicity, benthic community structure, fish community structure, and fish gross external pathology. Data were used to estimate the current status of the ecological condition of Virginian Province estuarine resources, and provide a baseline for identifying possible future changes. Estimates, with 95% confidence limits, of the areal extent of impacted resources within the Province are provided. Data are also presented by estuarine class (large estuaries, small estuarine systems, and large tidal rivers). Results show that, overall, approximately half of the estuarine waters of the Virginian Province can be classified as impacted based on multiple indicators, with hypoxia being the major stressor.
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment - ENVIRON MONIT ASSESS. 01/1999; 56(1):1-25.
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    ABSTRACT: Data from the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) from 1990 to 1993 were used to assess the condition of the Long Island Sound (LIS) estuary. Ambient water, sediment and biota were collected during the summer months from 53 LIS stations using an unbiased sampling design. The design consists of two LIS subunits, LIS proper, and small estuaries ( Keywords: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program; Long Island Sound; ecological conditions; hypoxia Document Type: Regular Paper Affiliations: 1: United States Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, R.I. 02882, U.S.A. (* author for correspondence, e-mail: schimmel.steve@epamail.epa.gov)} 2: United States Environmental Protection Agency, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Atlantic Ecology Division, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, R.I. 02882, U.S.A. Publication date: May 1, 1999 $(document).ready(function() { var shortdescription = $(".originaldescription").text().replace(/\\&/g, '&').replace(/\\, '<').replace(/\\>/g, '>').replace(/\\t/g, ' ').replace(/\\n/g, ''); if (shortdescription.length > 350){ shortdescription = "" + shortdescription.substring(0,250) + "... more"; } $(".descriptionitem").prepend(shortdescription); $(".shortdescription a").click(function() { $(".shortdescription").hide(); $(".originaldescription").slideDown(); return false; }); }); Related content In this: publication By this: publisher In this Subject: Ecology , Hydraulic & Environmental Engineering By this author: Schimmel, S.C. ; Benyi, S.J. ; Strobel, C.J. GA_googleFillSlot("Horizontal_banner_bottom");
    Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 01/1999; 56(1). · 1.59 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of interstitial cadmium and acid-volatile sulfide (AVS) in controlling the bioavailability of sediment-associated metal was examined using the chronic saltwater benthic colonization test. Sediments were spiked to achieve nominal cadmium/ AVS molar ratios of 0.0 (control), 0.1, 0.8, and 3.0 in this 118-d test. Oxidation of AVS in the surficial 2.4 cm within 2 to 4 weeks resulted in sulfide profiles similar to those occurring naturally in local sediments. In the nominal 0.1 cadmium/AVS treatment, measured simultaneously extracted metal (SEMcd) was always less than AVS. Interstitial cadmium concentrations (<3-10 μg/L) were less than those likely to cause biological effects. No significant biological effects were detected. In the nominal 0.8 cadmium/ AVS treatment, measured SEMcd commonly exceeded AVS in the surficial 2.4 cm of sediment. Interstitial cadmium concentrations (24-157 μg/L) were of likely toxicological significance to highly sensitive species. Shifts in the presence or absence over all taxa, and fewer macrobenthic polychaetes (Mediomastus ambiseta, Streblospio benedicti, and Podarke obscurd) and unidentified meio-faunal nematodes, were observed. In the nominal 3.0 cadmium/AVS treatment, concentrations of SEMcd were always greater than AVS throughout the sediment column. Interstitial cadmium ranged from 28,000 to 174,000 μg/L. In addition to the effects above, these sediments were colonized by fewer macrobenthic species, polychaete species, and harpacticoids; had lower densities of diatoms; lacked bivalve molluscs; and exhibited other impacts. Over all treatments, the observed biological responses were consistent with SEMcd/AVS ratios in surficial sediments and interstitial water cadmium concentrations.
    Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 11/1996; 15(12):2126 - 2137. · 2.62 Impact Factor
  • Sandra J. Benyi
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    ABSTRACT: Typescript. Binder's title: Calcium and contamination in marine mollusks. Thesis (M.S.)--University of Rhode Island, 1993. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-89).
  • Darvene Adams, Sandra Benyi