Fernanda O'Bello Correa

King Saud University, Riyadh, Mintaqat ar Riyad, Saudi Arabia

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Publications (4)7.46 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The deleterious effects of chewing betel-quid (BQ) with or without tobacco on periodontal health are poorly-addressed. The aim was to investigate the severity and extent of periodontal disease amongst individuals chewing BQ with and without tobacco. Methods: One hundred and twenty individuals (70 BQ-chewers [35 BQ-chewers with tobacco and 35 chewing BQ without tobacco] and 50 control individuals [non-chewers]) were included. Sociodemographic data and information regarding BQ-chewing habit were collected using a questionnaire. Plaque index (PI), bleeding on probing (BOP) and probing depth (PD) (4 millimeters [mm] to <6mm and ≥6mm) were measured. Numbers of missing teeth were recorded and marginal bone loss (MBL) was measured on panoramic radiographs. Statistical analyses were performed using one way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post-hoc test. Results: The socioeconomic status (SES) of subjects in the control group was significantly higher as compared to individuals chewing BQ either with- (P<0.01) or without tobacco (P<0.01). PI, BOP, PD (4mm<6mm and ≥6mm) were greater in subjects chewing BQ with tobacco than individuals chewing BQ without tobacco (P<0.05) and controls (P<0.01). Subjects chewing BQ with tobacco had fewer teeth than those chewing BQ without tobacco (P<0.05) and controls (P<0.001). MBL was higher in subjects chewing BQ with tobacco than those chewing BQ without tobacco (P<0.01) and controls (P<0.001). Conclusions: The severity of periodontal disease is enhanced in subjects chewing BQ with tobacco as compared to those chewing BQ without tobacco. Subjects with a low SES and poor are significantly more likely than others to develop periodontal disease.
    The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 11/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: It is known that gutka-chewing jeopardizes periodontal health; however, severity of periodontal inflammation in gutka-chewers with and without prediabetes remains unknown. The aim was to investigate the association of periodontal inflammatory conditions with gutka-chewing and pre-diabetes. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effect of gutka use on periodontal health was investigated among 44 individuals with prediabetes and 44 without prediabetes. Demographic information regarding age, sex, duration of prediabetes and gutka-chewing habits was collected using a questionnaire. Periodontal inflammatory conditions (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], probing depth [PD], marginal bone loss [MBL]), and fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) were recorded. Group differences in periodontal inflammatory parameters were tested using univariate and multivariable analyses (alpha ≤ 5%). Results: Periodontal inflammatory parameters (PI, BOP, and PD) were significantly higher in prediabetic subjects irrespective of the gutka-chewing habit (p<0.05). Odds of periodontal inflammation in prediabetic individuals were 9 times higher compared to healthy controls (95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 3.4-23.6). Gutka chewing alone, chewing among prediabetics and chewing among healthy controls did not statistically significantly increase the odds of periodontal inflammatory conditions. Prediabetics were statistically significantly more likely to have periodontal inflammation as compared to non-prediabetics even after controlling for sex and gutka-chewing (OR=13.2; 95% CI = 4.3 - 40.7). Conclusions: In medically-healthy individuals, periodontal inflammatory conditions are worse in gutka-chewers as compared to non-chewers; whereas in patients with prediabetes, the severity of periodontal inflammation is governed by hyperglycemia as opposed to habitual gutka usage.
    Journal of Periodontology 10/2012; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background: It is known that gutka-chewing jeopardizes periodontal health; however, severity of periodontal inflammation in gutka-chewers with and without prediabetes remains unknown. The aim was to investigate the association of periodontal inflammatory conditions with gutka chewing and pre-diabetes. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the effect of gutka use on periodontal health was investigated among 44 individuals with prediabetes and 44 without prediabetes. Demographic information regarding age, sex, duration of prediabetes and gutka-chewing habits was collected using a questionnaire. Periodontal inflammatory conditions (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], probing depth [PD], marginal bone loss [MBL]), and fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) were recorded. Group differences in periodontal inflammatory parameters were tested using univariate and multivariable analyses (alpha ≤ 5%). Results: Periodontal inflammatory parameters (PI, BOP, and PD) were significantly higher in prediabetic subjects irrespective of the gutka-chewing habit (p<0.05). Odds of periodontal inflammation in prediabetic individuals were 9 times higher compared to healthy controls (95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 3.4–23.6). Gutka chewing alone, chewing among prediabetics and chewing among healthy controls did not statistically significantly increase the odds of periodontal inflammatory conditions. Prediabetics were statistically significantly more likely to have periodontal inflammation as compared to non-prediabetics even after controlling for sex and gutka-chewing (OR=13.2; 95% CI = 4.3 – 40.7). Conclusions: In medically-healthy individuals, periodontal inflammatory conditions are worse in gutka-chewers as compared to non-chewers; whereas in patients with prediabetes, severity of periodontal inflammation is governed by hyperglycemia as opposed to habitual gutka usage.
    Journal of Periodontology 09/2012; · 2.40 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: The aim was to review the orofacial manifestations in patients with SCD. Methods: Indexed databases were explored using various combinations of the following keywords: "sickle cell anemia", "sickle cell disease", "oral health status", "dental" and osteomyelitis". Results: Hypoxia has been associated with osteomyelitis of the jaws, particularly the mandible in patients with SCD. Bone marrow hyperplasia in these patients causes depression of nasal bridge, mid-facial overgrowth and malocclusion. Mental nerve neuropathy due to osteomyelitis of the mandible causes numbness in the lower lip and chin. A diminished blood supply to teeth causes necrosis of the dental pulp in patients with SCD. Dental caries is a common manifestation in SCD patients, particularly in those with underprivileged living standards. The association between SCD and periodontal inflammatory conditions remains unclear. Conclusion: Oral health problems in patients with SCD are rare and occur mainly due to the poor oral hygiene maintenance.
    The American Journal of the Medical Sciences 06/2012; · 1.33 Impact Factor