N. R. Ross

Carnegie Institution for Science, Washington, West Virginia, United States

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Publications (18)66.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: KA1858+4850 is a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy at redshift 0.078 and is among the brightest active galaxies monitored by the Kepler mission. We have carried out a reverberation mapping campaign designed to measure the broad-line region size and estimate the mass of the black hole in this galaxy. We obtained 74 epochs of spectroscopic data using the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3-m telescope from February to November of 2012, and obtained complementary V-band images from five other ground-based telescopes. We measured the H-beta light curve lag with respect to the V-band continuum light curve using both cross-correlation techniques (CCF) and continuum light curve variability modeling with the JAVELIN method, and found rest-frame lags of lag_CCF = 13.53 (+2.03, -2.32) days and lag_JAVELIN = 13.15 (+1.08, -1.00) days. The H-beta root-mean-square line profile has a width of sigma_line = 770 +/- 49 km/s. Combining these two results and assuming a virial scale factor of f = 5.13, we obtained a virial estimate of M_BH = 8.06 (+1.59, -1.72) x 10^6 M_sun for the mass of the central black hole and an Eddington ratio of L/L_Edd ~ 0.2. We also obtained consistent but slightly shorter emission-line lags with respect to the Kepler light curve. Thanks to the Kepler mission, the light curve of KA1858+4850 has among the highest cadences and signal-to-noise ratios ever measured for an active galactic nucleus; thus, our black hole mass measurement will serve as a reference point for relations between black hole mass and continuum variability characteristics in active galactic nuclei.
    08/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high redshift (z ~ 1-2). While most high-z surveys are biased toward massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass (M ) relation for about 1000 emission line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of 0.3 z 2.3. We use the Hα emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to M ~107M ☉. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 Å. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-M sequence with much higher specific SFRs (>10 Gyr–1). While on-sequence galaxies follow continuous star formation processes, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in a period of less than 100 Myr. The contribution of the starburst population to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range 8.2 < log(M /M ☉) <10 and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 M ☉ yr–1 (10 M ☉ yr–1) at z ~ 1 (z ~ 2), we find that starbursts having EWrest(Hα) > 300, 200, and 100 Å contribute up to ~13%, 18%, and 34%, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line-selected sample at z ~ 1-2. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts toward lower masses.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2014; 789(2):96. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy of 26 emission-line galaxies at z ~ 2 obtained with the FIRE spectrometer on the Magellan Baade telescope. The sample was selected from the WISP survey, which uses the near-infrared grism of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.3 < z < 2.3. Our FIRE follow-up spectroscopy (R~5000) over 1.0-2.5 micron permits detailed measurements of physical properties of the z~2 emission-line galaxies. Dust-corrected star formation rates for the sample range from ~5-100 M_sun yr-1. We derive a median metallicity for the sample of ~0.45 Z_sun, and the estimated stellar masses range from ~10^8.5 - 10^9.5 M_sun. The average ionization parameters measured for the sample are typically much higher than what is found for local star-forming galaxies. We derive composite spectra from the FIRE sample, from which we infer typical nebular electron densities of ~100-400 cm^-3. Based on the location of the galaxies and composite spectra on BPT diagrams, we do not find evidence for significant AGN activity in the sample. Most of the galaxies as well as the composites are offset in the BPT diagram toward higher [O III]/H-beta at a given [N II]/H-alpha, in agreement with other observations of z > 1 star-forming galaxies, but composite spectra derived from the sample do not show an appreciable offset from the local star-forming sequence on the [O III]/H-beta versus [S II]/H-alpha diagram. We infer a high nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio from the composite spectrum, which may contribute to the offset of the high-redshift galaxies from the local star-forming sequence in the [O III]/H-beta versus [N II]/H-alpha diagram. We speculate that the elevated nitrogen abundance could result from substantial numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars in starbursting galaxies at z~2. (Abridged)
    02/2014; 785(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields observed using both the G102 and G141 grism. Using these derived emission line counts we make predictions for future space missions, like WFIRST, that will make extensive use of slitless grism spectroscopy in the near-IR over large areas of sky. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels (3-5x10^-17 ergs/s/cm2) than the near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology (1-4x10^-16 ergs/s/cm2), allowing us to both investigate the fainter emission lines the large area surveys will be missing and make count predictions for the deeper grism pointings that are likely to be done over smaller areas. Cumulative number counts of 0.7<z<1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 square degrees above an H-alpha flux of 2x10^{-16} ergs/s/cm2. Galaxies with low H-alpha/[OIII] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with H-alpha/[OIII < 0.95 that have H-alpha flux greater than 3x10^-16 ergs/s/cm2. We find good agreement between our derived luminosity functions and those from narrow band H-alpha surveys, like those of HiZELS (Sobral et al. 2013) and New Halpha (Ly et. 2011). The evolution in both the H-alpha luminosity function from z=0.3-1.5 and the [OIII] luminosity function from z=0.7-2.3 is almost entirely in the L* parameter, which steadily increases with redshift over those ranges. We will also present simulations of future large area near-infrared grism spectroscopy, based on the observed distributions of emission line fluxes, galaxy sizes, redshifts, H-alpha/[OIII] ratios, and equivalent widths seen in the WISP survey.
    01/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10^{8}< M/M_{\sun} < 10^{10}, obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 < z < 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R23 metallicity diagnostic: ([OII]3726,3729 + [OIII] 4959,5007)/H\beta. Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M=10^{9.8} M_{\sun} to 12+log(O/H)= 8.2 at M=10^{8.2} M_{\sun}. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M>10^{9.5} M_{\sun} and z~2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z~2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift z=1.76 of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M_{*} relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high SFRs. Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2013; 776(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We combine Hubble Space Telescope (HST) G102 & G141 NIR grism spectroscopy with HST/WFC3-UVIS, HST/WFC3-IR and Spitzer/IRAC[3.6\mu m] photometry to assemble a sample of massive (log(M_star/M_sun) ~ 11) and quenched galaxies at z~1.5. Our sample of 41 galaxies is the largest with G102+G141 NIR spectroscopy for quenched sources at these redshifts. In contrast to the local Universe, z~1.5 quenched galaxies in the high-mass range have a wide range of stellar population properties. We find their SEDs are well fitted with exponentially decreasing SFHs, and short star-formation time-scales (\tau<100Myr). Quenched galaxies also show a wide distribution in ages, between 1-4Gyr. In the (u-r)_0-versus-mass space quenched galaxies have a large spread in rest-frame color at a given mass. Most quenched galaxies populate the z~1.5 red-sequence (RS), but an important fraction of them (32%) have substantially bluer colors. Although with a large spread, we find that the quenched galaxies ON the RS have older median ages (3.1Gyr) than the quenched galaxies OFF the RS (1.5Gyr). We also show that a rejuvenated SED cannot reproduce the observed stacked spectra of (the bluer) quenched galaxies OFF the RS. We derive the upper limit on the fraction of massive galaxies ON the RS at z~1.5 to be <43%. We speculate that the young quenched galaxies OFF the RS are in a transition phase between vigorous star formation at z>2 and the z~1.5 RS. According to their estimated ages, the time required for quenched galaxies OFF the RS to join their counterparts ON the z~1.5 RS is of the order of ~1Gyr.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2013; 778(2). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields (0.037 deg^2) observed using both the G102 and G141 grisms. Altogether we identify 1048 emission line galaxies with observed equivalent widths greater than 40 Angstroms, 467 of which have multiple detected emission lines. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels (3-5x10^-17 ergs/s/cm^2) than the future space near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology (1-4x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2), allowing us to probe the fainter emission line galaxies that the shallower future surveys may miss. Cumulative number counts of 0.7<z<1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 deg^-2 above an H-alpha flux of 2x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. H-alpha-emitting galaxies with comparable [OIII] flux are roughly 5 times less common than galaxies with just H-alpha emission at those flux levels. Galaxies with low H-alpha/[OIII] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with H-alpha/[OIII] < 0.95 that have H-alpha flux greater than 3x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. Our H-alpha luminosity function contains a comparable number density of faint line emitters to that found by the NICMOS near-infrared grism surveys, but significantly fewer (factors of 3-4 less) high luminosity emitters. We also find that our high redshift (z=0.9-1.5) counts are in agreement with the high redshift (z=1.47) narrow band H-alpha survey of HiZELS (Sobral et al. 2013), while our lower redshift luminosity function (z=0.3-0.9) falls slightly below their z=0.84 result. The evolution in both the H-alpha luminosity function from z=0.3--1.5 and the [OIII] luminosity function from z=0.7-2.3 is almost entirely in the L* parameter, which steadily increases with redshift over those ranges.
    The Astrophysical Journal 05/2013; · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spectroscopic observations of Hα and Hβ emission lines of 128 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.75 z 1.5 are presented. These data were taken with slitless spectroscopy using the G102 and G141 grisms of the Wide-Field-Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel survey. Interstellar dust extinction is measured from stacked spectra that cover the Balmer decrement (Hα/Hβ). We present dust extinction as a function of Hα luminosity (down to 3 × 10 41 erg s −1), galaxy stellar mass (reaching 4 × 10 8 M), and rest-frame Hα equivalent width. The faintest galaxies are two times fainter in Hα luminosity than galaxies previously studied at z ∼ 1.5. An evolution is observed where galaxies of the same Hα luminosity have lower extinction at higher redshifts, whereas no evolution is found within our error bars with stellar mass. The lower Hα luminosity galaxies in our sample are found to be consistent with no dust extinction. We find an anti-correlation of the [O iii] λ5007/Hα flux ratio as a function of luminosity where galaxies with L Hα < 5 × 10 41 erg s −1 are brighter in [O iii] λ5007 than Hα. This trend is evident even after extinction correction, suggesting that the increased [O iii] λ5007/Hα ratio in low-luminosity galaxies is likely due to lower metallicity and/or higher ionization parameters.
    The Astrophysical Journal 02/2013; 763:145. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery and extensive early-time observations of the Type Ic supernova (SN) PTF12gzk. Our finely sampled light curves show a rise of 0.8mag within 2.5hr. Power-law fits [f(t)\sim(t-t_0)^n] to these data constrain the explosion date to within one day. We cannot rule out the expected quadratic fireball model, but higher values of n are possible as well for larger areas in the fit parameter space. Our bolometric light curve and a dense spectral sequence are used to estimate the physical parameters of the exploding star and of the explosion. We show that the photometric evolution of PTF12gzk is slower than that of most SNe Ic, and its high ejecta velocities (~30,000km/s four days after explosion) are closer to the observed velocities of broad-lined SNe Ic associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) than to the observed velocities in normal Type Ic SNe. The high velocities are sustained through the SN early evolution, and are similar to those of GRB-SNe when the SN reach peak magnitude. By comparison with the spectroscopically similar SN 2004aw, we suggest that the observed properties of PTF12gzk indicate an initial progenitor mass of 25-35 solar mass and a large (5-10E51 erg) kinetic energy, close to the regime of GRB-SN properties. The host-galaxy characteristics are consistent with GRB-SN hosts, and not with normal SN Ic hosts as well, yet this SN does not show the broad lines over extended periods of time that are typical of broad-line Type Ic SNe.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 08/2012; 760(2). · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first detailed study of the stellar populations of star-forming galaxies at z~1.5, which are selected by their [O II] emission line, detected in narrow-band surveys. We identified ~1,300 [O II] emitters at z=1.47 and z=1.62 in the Subaru Deep Field with rest-frame EWs above 13\AA. Optical and near-infrared spectroscopic observations for ~10% of our samples show that our separation of [O II] from [O III] emission-line galaxies in two-color space is 99% successful. We analyze the multi-wavelength properties of a subset of ~1,200 galaxies with the best photometry. They have average rest-frame EW of 45\AA, stellar mass of 3 x 10^9 M_sun, and stellar age of 100 Myr. In addition, our SED fitting and broad-band colors indicate that [O II] emitters span the full range of galaxy populations at z~1.5. We also find that 80% of [O II] emitters are also photometrically classified as "BX/BM" (UV) galaxies and/or the star-forming "BzK" (near-IR) galaxies. Our [O II] emission line survey produces a far more complete, and somewhat deeper sample of z~1.5 galaxies than either the BX/BM or sBzK selection alone. We constructed average SEDs and find that higher [O II] EW galaxies have somewhat bluer continua. SED model-fitting shows that they have on average half the stellar mass of galaxies with lower [O II] EW. The observed [O II] luminosity is well-correlated with the far-UV continuum with a logarithmic slope slightly 0f 0.89\pm0.22. The scatter of the [O II] luminosity against the far-UV continuum suggests that [O II] can be used as a SFR indicator with a reliability of 0.23 dex.
    The Astrophysical Journal 06/2012; 757(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery of three late-type (T4.5) brown dwarfs, including a probable Y dwarf, in the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) survey. We use the G141 grism spectra to determine the spectral types of the dwarfs and derive distance estimates based on a comparison with nearby T dwarfs with known parallaxes. These are the most distant spectroscopically confirmed T/Y dwarfs, with the farthest at an estimated distance of ∼400 pc. We compare the number of cold dwarfs found in the WISP survey with simulations of the brown dwarf mass function. The number found is generally consistent with an initial stellar mass function dN/dM ∝ M −α with α = 0.0–0.5, although the identification of a Y dwarf is somewhat surprising and may be indicative of either a flatter absolute magnitude/spectral-type relation than previously reported or an upturn in the number of very-late-type brown dwarfs in the observed volume.
    The Astrophysical Journal Letters 06/2012; 752:14-4. · 6.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Spectroscopic observations of Halpha and Hbeta emission lines of 128 star-forming galaxies in the redshift range 0.75<z<1.5 are presented. These data were taken with slitless spectroscopy using the G102 and G141 grisms of the Wide-Field-Camera 3 (WFC3) on board the Hubble Space Telescope as part of the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) survey. Interstellar dust extinction is measured from stacked spectra that cover the Balmer decrement (Halpha/Hbeta). We present dust extinction as a function of Halpha luminosity (down to 3 x 10^{41} erg/s), galaxy stellar mass (reaching 4 x 10^{8} Msun), and rest-frame Halpha equivalent width. The faintest galaxies are two times fainter in Halpha luminosity than galaxies previously studied at z~1.5. An evolution is observed where galaxies of the same Halpha luminosity have lower extinction at higher redshifts, whereas no evolution is found within our error bars with stellar mass. The lower Halpha luminosity galaxies in our sample are found to be consistent with no dust extinction. We find an anti-correlation of the [OIII]5007/Halpha flux ratio as a function of luminosity where galaxies with L_{Halpha}<5 x 10^{41} erg/s are brighter in [OIII]5007 than Halpha. This trend is evident even after extinction correction, suggesting that the increased [OIII]5007/Halpha ratio in low luminosity galaxies is likely due to lower metallicity and/or higher ionization parameters.
    06/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: Future space telescopes are likely to make extensive use of slitless grism spectroscopy in the near-IR over large areas of sky. Both ESA's recently selected Euclid mission and the WFIRST mission being studied by NASA plan slitless spectroscopic surveys to obtain redshifts over thousands of square degrees. The HST WFC3 camera has two near-infrared grisms, G102 and G141, covering 0.8-1.6 microns, making it perfect the perfect laboratory for predicting what these future missions will find. We present results from the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program, which has been taking deep WFC3 observations using both grisms at random locations across the sky in parallel with primary COS observations. The WISP survey presently consists of more than 150 fields, covering 700 square arcminutes, reaching fluxes of 5 x 10-17 ergs/s/cm2. We will present completeness corrected number counts, luminosity functions, and predicted counts for the proposed future missions. We will also discuss the issue of line identification of the emission lines, particularly H-alpha and [OIII]5007 which often have similar fluxes and equivalent widths.
    01/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) higher than 200 Å. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin2 area that we have analyzed so far. This population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with high specific star formation rates (sSFR). After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12 + log(O/H) =7.47 ± 0.11. After estimating the active galactic nucleus fraction in the sample, we show that the high-EW galaxies have higher sSFR than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. We find that the nebular emission lines can substantially affect the total broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with some examples of line contamination producing brightening of up to 1 mag. We show that the presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z ~ 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low-redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Without deep optical data, most of the interlopers cannot be ruled out in the wide shallow HST imaging surveys. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their spectral energy distribution (SED). Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies. Therefore, the contribution of emission lines should be systematically taken into account in SED fitting of star-forming galaxies at all redshifts.
    The Astrophysical Journal 11/2011; 743(2):121. · 6.73 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the Universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin^2 area we analyzed so far. After estimating the AGN fraction in the sample, we show that this population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with higher specific star formation rates than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/LRIS, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12+Log(O/H)= 7.47 +- 0.11. The nebular emission-lines can substantially affect the broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with examples producing brightening of up to 1 mag. The presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z ~ 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their SED. Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies. Therefore the contribution of emission lines should be systematically taken into account in SED fitting of star-forming galaxies at all redshifts.
    09/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: Narrow-band surveys have been conducted to identify high redshift star-forming galaxies by detecting their nebular emission lines when redshifted into narrow bandpasses. Such surveys have yielded large samples from low redshifts (z
    01/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) Survey. WISP is obtaining slitless, near-infrared grism spectroscopy of ~90 independent, high-latitude fields by observing in the pure-parallel mode with the Wide Field Camera Three on the Hubble Space Telescope for a total of ~250 orbits. Spectra are obtained with the G 102 (λ = 0.8-1.17 μm, R ~210) and G 141 grisms (λ = 1.11-1.67 μm, R ~130), together with direct imaging in the J and H bands (F110W and F140W, respectively). In the present paper, we present the first results from 19 WISP fields, covering approximately 63 arcmin2. For typical exposure times (~6400 s in G 102 and ~2700 s in G 141), we reach 5σ detection limits for emission lines of f ~ 5 × 10–17 erg s–1 cm–2 for compact objects. Typical direct imaging 5σ limits are 26.3 and 26.1 mag. (AB) in F110W and F140W, respectively. Restricting ourselves to the lines measured with the highest confidence, we present a list of 328 emission lines, in 229 objects, in a redshift range 0.3 < z < 3. The single-line emitters are likely to be a mix of Hα and [O III]5007,4959 Å, with Hα predominating. The overall surface density of high-confidence emission-line objects in our sample is approximately 4 per arcmin2. These first fields show high equivalent width sources, active galactic nucleus, and post-starburst galaxies. The median observed star formation rate (SFR) of our Hα-selected sample is 4 M ☉ yr–1. At intermediate redshifts, we detect emission lines in galaxies as faint as H 140 ~ 25, or MR < –19, and are sensitive to SFRs down to less than 1 M ☉ yr–1. The slitless grisms on WFC3 provide a unique opportunity to study the spectral properties of galaxies much fainter than L* at the peak of the galaxy assembly epoch.
    The Astrophysical Journal 10/2010; 723(1):104. · 6.73 Impact Factor
  • Nathaniel Ross, C. Ly, K. Ota, M. Malkan, K. Sekiguchi
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    ABSTRACT: Star-forming galaxies can be identified by their excesses of emission in narrowband filters over the expected continuum emission derived from their broadband fluxes. We present a selection of redshift z=0.48 Halpha, z=0.95 [0III] and z=1.61 [OII] emitting galaxies in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) Center and South fields. These are selected by an excess emission in the NB973 filter over z-band. These three classes of objects are separated using broadband color-selection techniques and spectroscopic follow-up. Measurements of the strength of these emission lines are used to derive star-formation rates (SFRs) for galaxies at these redshifts, which in turn can help constrain the cosmic star-formation history.

Publication Stats

55 Citations
66.55 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Carnegie Institution for Science
      Washington, West Virginia, United States
  • 2010–2013
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 2012
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Astronomy
      Berkeley, California, United States