T M Besett

University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA, United States

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Publications (5)8.2 Total impact

  • J L Wong, T M Besett
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    ABSTRACT: Sex differences on the MMPI-2 addiction scales (MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale-Revised, Addiction Acknowledgement Scale, Addiction Potential Scale) and their ability to distinguish between substance-abusing and nonabusing psychiatric inpatients were examined. Men obtained higher mean raw scores than women on the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale-Revised and the Addiction Acknowledgement Scale, and substance abusers scored higher on all three scales. Even relatively low cutoff scores, however, on the MacAndrew Alcoholism Scale-Revised resulted in false negative rates of 37 to 39%. The results support the utility of the MMPI-2 substance abuse scales; however, lower cutoff scores should be used with women and within a psychiatric population.
    Psychological Reports 05/1999; 84(2):582-4. · 0.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The role of adaptive beliefs and attitudes against suicide has not been given adequate attention in the clinical or assessment literature. This article reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of a 32-item self-report inventory, the Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (RFL-A). In Phase 1, we used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to identify five correlated factors: Future Optimism, Suicide-Related Concerns, Family Alliance, Peer Acceptance and Support, and Self-Acceptance. In Phase 2, we cross-validated the 5-factor oblique model in a different group of adolescents recruited from two high schools. In addition, we examined evidence for convergent, discriminant, and construct validities. The coefficient alpha indices for the RFL-A total and scales were satisfactory. In Phase 3, we evaluated additional evidence of reliability and validity using samples of high school and psychiatric inpatient adolescents. The results suggest that the RFL-A is a short, reliable, and valid measure that is potentially useful in the assessment of adolescent suicidal behavior.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology 01/1999; 54(8):1063-78. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The role of adaptive beliefs and attitudes against suicide has not been given adequate attention in the clinical or assessment literature. This article reports on the development and initial psychometric properties of a 32-item self-report inventory, the Reasons for Living Inventory for Adolescents (RFL-A). In Phase 1, we used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to identify five correlated factors: Future Optimism, Suicide-Related Concerns, Family Alliance, Peer Acceptance and Support, and Self-Acceptance. In Phase 2, we cross-validated the 5-factor oblique model in a different group of adolescents recruited from two high schools. In addition, we examined evidence for convergent, discriminant, and construct validities. The coefficient alpha indices for the RFL-A total and scales were satisfactory. In Phase 3, we evaluated additional evidence of reliability and validity using samples of high school and psychiatric inpatient adolescents. The results suggest that the RFL-A is a short, reliable, and valid measure that is potentially useful in the assessment of adolescent suicidal behavior. © 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. J Clin Psychol 54: 1063–1078, 1998.
    Journal of Clinical Psychology 12/1998; 54(8):1063 - 1078. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study modified and evaluated the psychometric properties of the Reasons for Living Inventory (RFL) in samples of adolescents. Internal consistency reliability, corrected item-total scale correlation, and exploratory factor analysis procedures were used with a mixed sample of 260 adolescents to identify 14 items for the brief version of the RFL (BRFL-A). Confirmatory factor analyses provided support for the five-factor oblique structure of the BRFL-A in a psychiatric inpatient sample with a range of suicidal behaviors. Reliabilities of the BRFL-A subscales were satisfactory. Four of the five subscales differentiated between suicidal and nonsuicidal adolescents. Significant correlations were found between three BRFL-A subscales and several suicide indices. Convergent-discriminant validity was examined by correlating the BRFL-A subscales with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory—Adolescents (MMPI-A) Content Scales. Limitations of the study are discussed.
    Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 07/1996; 24(4):433-443. · 3.09 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study included revision and systematic examination of the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Cognition Checklist. Two separate samples of college undergraduates participated. Analysis showed that all the models reported previously in the literature fitted the data poorly for Sample 1 (n = 220). Principal components and maximum likelihood exploratory analyses of the responses of the 220 students yielded two moderately correlated factors. Using data from Sample 2 (n = 288), LISREL confirmatory factor analyses showed that the two-factor oblique model provided adequate fit to the observed data. Estimates of internal consistency were .88 and .71. Preliminary normative, convergent, and divergent validity data are reported. In addition, directions for research are discussed.
    Psychological Reports 05/1995; 76(2):523-8. · 0.44 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

74 Citations
8.20 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1996–1999
    • University of Northern Iowa
      • Department of Psychology
      Cedar Falls, IA, United States
  • 1998
    • University of Nebraska at Lincoln
      Lincoln, Nebraska, United States