Supratik Mukhopadhyay

Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States

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Publications (63)10.73 Total impact

  • Manuel Peralta, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Ramesh Bharadwaj
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    ABSTRACT: We present a formal framework for reasoning about security concerns in the context of embedded sensor networks. We first provide an agent-based programming model for sensor networks. A logical framework enables reasoning about security, safety, and integrity with respect to usage of resources in this model. Embedded sensor networks often operate in rapidly changing mission-critical environments where both functional and nonfunctional requirements can alter dynamically in an unforeseen manner. The network may need to be reconfigured and reprogrammed in response to changes in its operating conditions. We provide a framework based on counterfactual logic to formally represent changes to the system and perform what-if reasoning about their impact on security and safety even before they have been applied.1 Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Concurrency and Computation Practice and Experience 01/2015; DOI:10.1002/cpe.3433 · 0.78 Impact Factor
  • Hsiao-Chun Wu, Tian Xia, Yiyan Wu, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: The transmitter identification (Tx-ID) technique has been widely addressed in the modern advanced television systems committee digital television (DTV) standards. Kasami sequences are adopted as the Tx-ID sequences due to the favorable code capacity. However, the conventional cross-correlation based Tx-ID technique cannot combat the realistic multipath channel impairment. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new least-square Tx-ID approach, which is demonstrated to be very robust when the multipath channels are encountered. We also establish the new Hessian analysis to provide the range for appropriate injection levels accordingly. Based on this new theoretical study, we design new efficient (fast) algorithms to determine the maximum allowable channel length given a particular Kasami Tx-ID sequence. These algorithms and theoretical results can be very useful for the future DTV technologies.
    IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting 12/2014; 60(4):715-723. DOI:10.1109/TBC.2014.2365251 · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Manuel Peralta, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: This article shows a novel program analysis framework based on Lewis' theory of counterfactuals. Using this framework we are capable of performing change-impact static analysis on a program's source code. In other words, we are able to prove the properties induced by changes to a given program before applying these changes. Our contribution is two-fold; we show how to use Lewis' logic of counterfactuals to prove that proposed changes to a program preserve its correctness. We report the development of an automated tool based on resolution and theorem proving for performing code change-impact analysis.
    International Journal of Software Engineering and Knowledge Engineering 04/2014; 23(10). DOI:10.1142/S0218194013500460 · 0.26 Impact Factor
  • K. Ravindran, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Subhajit Sidhanta, A. Sabbir
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we consider the impact of a weaker model of eventual consistency on distributed multi-player games. This model is suitable for networks in which hosts can leave and join at anytime, e.g., in an intermittently connected environment. Such a consistency model is provided by the Secure Infrastructure for Networked Systems (SINS) [24], a reliable middleware framework. SINS allows agents to communicate asynchronously through a distributed transactional key-value store using anonymous publish-subscribe. It uses Lamport's Paxos protocol [17] to replicate state. We consider a multi-player maze game as example to illustrate our consistency model and the impact of network losses/delays therein. The framework based on SINS presented herein provides a vehicle for studying the effect of human elements participating in collaborative simulation of a physical world as in war games.
    2014 Sixth International Conference on Communication Systems and Networks (COMSNETS); 01/2014
  • Zheng Lu, Christopher Steinmuller, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: Formal verification of the trusted computing base of a software system is essential for its deployment in mission-critical environments. Commercial off-the-shelf routers are nowadays being used for managing traffic in high-assurance networks. The specifications for the development of these routers are provided by RFCs that are only described informally in English. It is essential to ensure that a router firmware conforms to its corresponding RFC before it can be deployed for managing mission-critical networks. In this paper, we report the formal verification of the conformance of the open source Netgear WNR3500L wireless router firmware implementation to the RFC 2131 [6] based on which it is designed. The formal verification effort led to the discovery of several possible problems in the implementation that we report in this paper. We have used the Coq proof assistant extensively in this verification effort. The formal verification process demonstrates the usefulness of inductive types and higher-order logic in software certification.
    Proceedings of the 2013 IEEE 37th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference; 07/2013
  • Yonas G. Debessu, Hsiao-Chun Wu, Hong Jiang, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: Current DVB-SH systems rely on hierarchical modulation to insert local content into the complementary ground component. The local content is inserted as a low priority bit stream, while the global content will be transmitted as a high-priority bit stream. At the receiver, the standard approach of extracting the local content from the received signal first requires detection of the global content. Subsequently, one can extract the local content by subtracting the coded and modulated form (restored version) of the detected global content from the received signal. In this paper, we propose a different approach to remove the global content from the received signal. In our new approach, a hybrid signal is designed to represent the turbo-coded global content, which contains decoded bits from the turbo decoder representing systematic bits, and detected bits from the received signal prior to the turbo decoder representing parity bits. This technique would relieve the receiver from performing coding and modulation on the detected global content so as to ensure a less computational burden and a smaller latency than the current technology. The obvious tradeoff between complexity and performance would imply higher bit error rates arising from our proposed system. Therefore, to mitigate the bit-error-rate performance degradation, we propose modifying the turbo decoder so that the systematic bit streams and the parity bit streams will be decoded differently with respect to their corresponding signal-to-noise ratios. Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that our proposed new scheme can achieve better computational efficiency and less latency in the slight sacrifice of error performance.
    IEEE Transactions on Broadcasting 03/2013; 59(1):129 – 135. DOI:10.1109/TBC.2012.2231297 · 2.65 Impact Factor
  • Manuel Peralta, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Ramesh Bharadwaj
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a technique for automatic synthesis of workflows in service-oriented systems from a typetheoretic specification of coordination requirements. The technique presented involves formal semantics-based, automatic synthesis of service coordination workflows from the business logic of the clients using type and effect inference. The type and effect deduction, apart from synthesizing the workflow, provides formal proofs that the business requirements of the clients in a service-oriented system are met. The service descriptions and the business requirements are specified as a set of type judgements in an (intuitionistic) type theory. Workflows can be generated from a (type and effect) inference of the requirements from the "service theory".
    Distributed Computing Systems Workshops (ICDCSW), 2013 IEEE 33rd International Conference on; 01/2013
  • S. Sidhanta, S. Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: We present a distributed execution environment for multi-agent systems running in an intermittently-connected network. We describe the design and implementation of a microkernel-based prototype operating system layer that provides services for managing agent execution. The execution environment provides the user with a consistent view of a single machine, a single file system, and a unified programming model.
    Communication Systems and Networks (COMSNETS), 2013 Fifth International Conference on; 01/2013
  • Zheng Lu, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: MATLAB is widely used in scientific, engineering, and numerical computations. Complex systems such as digital signal processors, process control systems, etc. are modeled in MATLAB and analyzed; C implementation of the system can be automatically generated from the validated MATLAB model. We combine static analysis techniques with model-based deductive verification using SMT solvers to provide a framework to analyze MATLAB code. The analyzer is generated by translating the collecting semantics of a MATLAB script to a formula in first order logic over multiple underlying theories. Function calls in a script can be handled by importing SMT assertions obtained by analyzing MATLAB files containing function definitions. Logical specification of the desired program behavior (rather its negation) is incorporated as a first order logic formula. An SMT-LIB formula solver treats the combined formula as a "constraint" and "solves" it. The "solved form" can be used to identify logical errors in the MATLAB model.
    Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Leveraging Applications of Formal Methods, Verification and Validation: technologies for mastering change - Volume Part I; 10/2012
  • Hong Yi Chen, Shaked Flur, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: Analysis of termination and other liveness properties of an imperative program can be reduced to termination proof synthesis for simple loops, i.e., loops with only variable updates in the loop body. Among simple loops, the subset of Linear Simple Loops (LSLs) is particular interesting because it is common in practice and expressive in theory. Existing techniques can successfully synthesize a linear ranking function for an LSL if there exists one. However, when a terminating LSL does not have a linear ranking function, these techniques fail. In this paper we describe an automatic method that generates proofs of universal termination for LSLs based on the synthesis of disjunctive ranking relations. The method repeatedly finds linear ranking functions on parts of the state space and checks whether the transitive closure of the transition relation is included in the union of the ranking relations. Our method extends the work of Podelski and Rybalchenko [27]. We have implemented a prototype of the method and have shown experimental evidence of the effectiveness of our method.
    Proceedings of the 19th international conference on Static Analysis; 09/2012
  • Zheng Lu, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: We combine static analysis techniques with model- based deductive verification using SMT solvers to provide a framework that, given an analysis aspect of the source code, automatically generates an analyzer capable of inferring information about that aspect. The analyzer is generated by translating the collecting semantics of a program to a "marked" formula in first order logic over multiple underlying theories. The "marking" can be thought of as a set of holes or contexts corresponding to the "uninterpreted" APIs invoked in the program. Just as a program imports packages and uses methods from classes in those packages, we import the semantics of the API invocations as first order logic assertions. These assertions constitute the models used by the analyzer. Logical specification of the desired program behavior (rather its negation) is incorporated as a first order logic formula. An SMT-LIB formula solver treats the combined formula as a "constraint" and "solves" it. The "solved form" can be used to identify logical (security) errors in Java (Android) programs. Security properties of Android are represented as constraints and the analysis aims to show that these constraints are respected.
    Proceedings of the 2012 IEEE 36th Annual Computer Software and Applications Conference; 07/2012
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    ABSTRACT: A computational framework for modeling the respiratory motion of lung tumors provides a 4D parametric representation that tracks, analyzes, and models movement to provide more accurate guidance in the planning and delivery of lung tumor radiotherapy.
    Computer 02/2012; DOI:10.1109/MC.2011.230 · 1.44 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Real-time detection and processing of both normal and abnormal event patterns in cyber-physical systems are imperative for advancing early warning and response capabilities. We integrate fundamental principles from logic-based program synthesis and multiagent systems to lay out the foundations of novel complex event processing (CEP) techniques and tools for intelligent reliable management of power systems. We investigate the formal underpinnings of a novel distributed, complex event-triggered, knowledge-based control system for situation-aware, provably-correct, declarative control of the logic of large power systems.
  • S. Sidhanta, S. Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: We present a novel execution environment for multi-agent systems building on concepts from cloud computing and peer-to-peer networks. The novel environment can provide the computing power of a cloud for multi-agent systems in intermittently connected networks. We present the design and implementation of a prototype operating system for managing the environment. The operating system provides the user with a consistent view of a single machine, a single file system, and a unified programming model while providing elasticity and availability.
    Cloud Computing (CLOUD), 2012 IEEE 5th International Conference on; 01/2012
  • K. Ravindran, S. Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: The paper is on generic service-level management tools that enable the reconfiguration of a distributed network application whenever there are resource-level changes or failures in the underlying network sub-systems. We present a formal model-based approach for monitoring compliance and adapting the system in response. In our model, the management entity maintains policy scripts and rules to coordinate the application-level reconfigurations and adaptations in response to the changes/outages in the underlying network services. The paper presents a case study of rate-adaptive video multicast over IP-based infrastructure networks, to demonstrate the usefulness of our management model. The model offers an end-to-end framework for the development of Future Internet applications.
    Third International Conference on Communication Systems and Networks, COMSNETS 2011, Bangalore, India, January 4-8, 2011; 01/2011
  • Manuel Peralta, Supratik Mukhopadhyay
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present a framework for what-if analysis of programs based on Lewis' theory of counterfactuals (1). The framework can be used to statically perform change- impact analysis for source code. It enables us to verify asser- tions about a changed version of the program without actually incorporating the changes. We present a logical calculus that precisely characterizes structural modifications to source code and their impact on the behavior of the program. Keywords-formal verification; proof theory; theorem prov- ing; software engineering I. INTRODUCTION In the software development life-cycle, the majority of costs are usually incurred during the testing and maintenance phase. Addition of new features, optimizations, refactoring and fixing of defects necessitates modifications of the soft- ware system's source code. While a combination of formal methods and testing as it has been shown in (2), (3) can lead towards a defect-free software, aggressive optimizations and other modifications can undo the quality resulting from thousands of hours of verification and validation efforts. In many cases, such optimizations and modifications are done without a complete understanding of the system (specially in the cases of parallel programs). Due to the complexity and size of today's software systems, completely understanding a system by code review is out of question. Regardless of how a programmer modifies the program, extensive regression tests are needed in order to verify that (1) the new program version still complies with its correctness constraints and/or (2) the new version complies with the properties implied by the new requirements. In this paper we present a framework for what-if analysis of programs based on Lewis' theory of counterfactuals (1). The framework can be used to statically perform change- impact analysis for source code. It enables us to verify assertions about a changed version of the program without actually incorporating the changes. We present a logical calculus that precisely characterizes potential structural mod- ifications to source code and their impact on the program's behavior. It is possible to manually apply the modifications to the program and then statically analyze the resulting code to check whether or not it conforms to the expected behavior. However, if the new version does not comply with the expected behavior then the entire effort spent in modifying the code is wasted. Our framework allows a programmer to think of alternate ways of implementing a program and prevents wasted efforts in writing code that does not meet the objectives.
    Proceedings of the 35th Annual IEEE International Computer Software and Applications Conference, COMPSAC 2011, Munich, Germany, 18-22 July 2011; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: In wide-area video conferencing, the rate control of video sources to relieve network congestion along the multicast data path occurs in a distributed manner. In this paper, we study the desirable properties of signaling channels that carry the 'packet loss report' (ELR) from a receiver to the sources as a short control message. A signaling channel provides for loss-free and time-ordered flow of ELRs from receivers, so that the rate adjustments of sources triggered by the signaling messages are executed correctly. For instance, the loss of a ELR may delay the source-level response to relieve congestion. Our goal is to improve the quality of rate adaptation when relieving congestion along the video data paths, with a suitably constructed ELR-signaling channel. For this purpose, we employ a group communication substrate, SINS, that provides loss-free and time-ordered message flows based on Lamport's concept of global virtual time. The paper demonstrates improvements in the quality of adaptation during congestion relief: faster convergence to final send rates and lower rate oscillations.
    Third International Conference on Communication Systems and Networks, COMSNETS 2011, Bangalore, India, January 4-8, 2011; 01/2011
  • Source
    Manuel Peralta, Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Ramesh Bharadwaj
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    ABSTRACT: In this short paper, we provide the background to counterfactual logic and give very general suggestions on how we could employ this logic to help us reason about security policies. It seems very appropriate to use this kind of logic to anticipate a change that will compromise the security concerns of a given system before actually applying the changes.
    Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Security of Information and Networks, SIN 2011, Sydney, NSW, Australia, November 14-19, 2011; 01/2011
  • Source
    Supratik Mukhopadhyay, Ramesh Bharadwaj, Hasan Davulcu
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    ABSTRACT: AJAX (Asynchronous Javascript and XML) is a confederation of technologies aimed at providing improved user interaction with web-based applications. While AJAX provides an improved user experience, it also comes with its baggage of problems. The lack of formal semantics makes AJAX applications difficult to build, debug, understand, and validate. Different component technologies of AJAX (e.g., XMLHttpRequest or Javascript) are browser-sensitive and have different implementations and provide distinct functionalities. Source code is downloaded and run on the clients machines, raising security concerns. In this paper, we present an ``AJAX''-like framework in an event-driven secure synchronous programming environment. Our framework is supported by a formal operational semantics. Applications written in our language can be verified using formal static analysis techniques such as theorem proving. The applications are compiled and run on the SINS (Secure Infrastructure for Networked Systems) infrastructure jointly developed in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory.
    44th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS-44 2011), Proceedings, 4-7 January 2011, Koloa, Kauai, HI, USA; 01/2011

Publication Stats

210 Citations
10.73 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010–2015
    • Louisiana State University
      • • Department of Computer Science
      • • Department of Computer Science (Engineering)
      Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States
  • 2014
    • Independent University, Bangladesh
      Bangladesh
  • 2011
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York City, New York, United States
  • 2007–2010
    • Utah State University
      • Department of Computer Science
      Logan, Ohio, United States
  • 2008
    • University of Toledo
      Toledo, Ohio, United States
  • 2005
    • Arizona State University
      • School of Computing, Informatics, and Decision Systems Engineering
      Phoenix, Arizona, United States
  • 2004–2005
    • West Virginia University
      • Department of Computer Science & Electrical Engineering
      Morgantown, West Virginia, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Pennsylvania
      Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 2002
    • Max Planck Institute for Informatics
      Saarbrücken, Saarland, Germany