L. Dunne

Imperial College London, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (204)632.66 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present new Herschel photometric and spectroscopic observations of Supernova 1987A, carried out in 2012. Our dedicated photometric measurements provide new 70 micron data and improved imaging quality at 100 and 160 micron compared to previous observations in 2010. Our Herschel spectra show only weak CO line emission, and provide an upper limit for the 63 micron [O I] line flux, eliminating the possibility that line contaminations distort the previously estimated dust mass. The far-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) is well fitted by thermal emission from cold dust. The newly measured 70 micron flux constrains the dust temperature, limiting it to nearly a single temperature. The far-infrared emission can be fitted by 0.5+-0.1 Msun of amorphous carbon, about a factor of two larger than the current nucleosynthetic mass prediction for carbon. The observation of SiO molecules at early and late phases suggests that silicates may also have formed and we could fit the SED with a combination of 0.3 Msun of amorphous carbon and 0.5 Msun of silicates, totalling 0.8 Msun of dust. Our analysis thus supports the presence of a large dust reservoir in the ejecta of SN 1987A. The inferred dust mass suggests that supernovae can be an important source of dust in the interstellar medium, from local to high-redshift galaxies.
    11/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present the first measurement of the correlation between the map of the CMB lensing potential derived from the Planck nominal mission data and $z >1.5$ galaxies detected by the Herschel-ATLAS (H-ATLAS) survey covering about $600\,\hbox{deg}^2$, i.e. about 1.4% of the sky. A highly significant ($20\,\sigma$) correlation is found, substantially stronger than expected. The result was checked by performing a number of null tests. The galaxy bias parameter, $b$, derived from a joint analysis of the cross-power spectrum and of the auto-power spectrum of the galaxy density contrast is found to be $b=2.80^{+0.12}_{-0.11}$, consistent with earlier estimates for H-ATLAS galaxies at similar redshifts. On the other hand, the amplitude of the cross-correlation is found to be a factor $1.62 \pm 0.16$ higher than expected from the standard model and also found by cross-correlation analyses with other tracers of the large-scale structure. The enhancement due to lensing magnification can account for only a fraction of the excess cross-correlation signal. We suggest that most of it may be due to an incomplete removal of the contamination of the CIB, that includes the H-ATLAS sources we are cross-correlating with. In any case, the highly significant detection reported here using a catalog covering only 1.4% of the sky demonstrates the potential of CMB lensing correlations with sub-mm surveys.
    10/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We use 10,387 galaxies from the Herschel Astrophysical TeraHertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) to probe the far-infrared radio correlation (FIRC) of star forming galaxies as a function of redshift, wavelength, and effective dust temperature. All of the sources in our 250 {\mu}m-selected sample have spectroscopic redshifts, as well as 1.4 GHz flux density estimates measured from the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres (FIRST) survey. This enables us to study not only individual sources, but also the average properties of the 250 {\mu}m selected population using median stacking techniques. We find that individual sources detected at $\geq 5\sigma$ in both the H-ATLAS and FIRST data have logarithmic flux ratios (i.e. FIRC $q_\lambda$ parameters) consistent with previous studies of the FIRC. In contrast, the stacked values show larger $q_\lambda$, suggesting excess far-IR flux density/luminosity in 250{\mu}m selected sources above what has been seen in previous analyses. In addition, we find evidence that 250 {\mu}m sources with warm dust SEDs have a larger 1.4 GHz luminosity than the cooler sources in our sample. Though we find no evidence for redshift evolution of the monochromatic FIRC, our analysis reveals significant temperature dependence. Whilst the FIRC is reasonably constant with temperature at 100 {\mu}m, we find increasing inverse correlation with temperature as we probe longer PACS and SPIRE wavelengths. These results may have important implications for the use of monochromatic dust luminosity as a star formation rate indicator in star-forming galaxies, and in the future, for using radio data to determine galaxy star formation rates.
    09/2014; 445(3).
  • http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361/201014586. 09/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present a derivation of the star formation rate per comoving volume of quasar host galaxies, derived from stacking analyses of far-infrared to mm-wave photometry of quasars with redshifts 0 ensuremath< ensuremath zensuremath<?iensuremath> ensuremath< 6 and absolute ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>-band magnitudes -22 ensuremath> ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>ensuremath ABensuremath<?subensuremath> ensuremath> -32 We use the science demonstration observations of the first textttchar12616 degensuremath 2ensuremath<?supensuremath> from the ensuremath Herschelensuremath<?iensuremath> Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) in which there are 240 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and a further 171 from the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO (2SLAQ) survey. We supplement this data with a compilation of data from IRAS, ISO, ensuremath Spitzerensuremath<?iensuremath>, SCUBA and MAMBO. H-ATLAS alone statistically detects the quasars in its survey area at ensuremath>5ensuremath ensuremathsigmaensuremath<?iensuremath> at 250,350 and 500 ensuremath ensuremathmuensuremath<?iensuremath>m. From the compilation as a whole we find striking evidence of downsizing in quasar host galaxy formation: low-luminosity quasars with absolute magnitudes in the range -22 ensuremath> ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>ensuremath ABensuremath<?subensuremath> ensuremath> -24 have a comoving star formation rate (derived from 100 ensuremath ensuremathmuensuremath<?iensuremath>m rest-frame luminosities) peaking between redshifts of ensuremath 1ensuremath<?iensuremath> and ensuremath 2ensuremath<?iensuremath>, while high-luminosity quasars with ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>ensuremath ABensuremath<?subensuremath> ensuremath< -26 have a maximum contribution to the star formation density at ensuremath zensuremath<?iensuremath> textttchar126 3. The volume-averaged star formation rate of -22 ensuremath> ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>ensuremath ABensuremath<?subensuremath> ensuremath> -24 quasars evolves as (1 ? ensuremath zensuremath<?iensuremath>)ensuremath 2.3$pm$0.7ensuremath<?supensuremath> at ensuremath zensuremath<?iensuremath> ensuremath< 2, but the evolution at higher luminosities is much faster reaching (1 ? ensuremath zensuremath<?iensuremath>)ensuremath 10$pm$1ensuremath<?supensuremath> at -26 ensuremath> ensuremath Iensuremath<?iensuremath>ensuremath ABensuremath<?subensuremath> ensuremath> -28. We tentatively interpret this as a combination of a declining major merger rate with time and gas consumption reducing fuel for both black hole accretion and star formation.
    Astronomy and Astrophysics. 09/2014; 518:L7?1-L7?5.
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    ABSTRACT: We report an unexpected variation in the positional offset distributions between Herschel-ATLAS sub-millimetre (submm) sources and their optical associations, depending on both 250-{\mu}m signal-to-noise ratio and 250/350-{\mu}m colour. We show that redder and brighter submm sources have optical associations with a broader distribution of positional offsets than would be expected if these offsets were due to random positional errors in the source extraction. The observation can be explained by two possible effects: either red submm sources trace a more clustered population than blue ones, and their positional errors are increased by confusion; or red submm sources are generally at high redshifts and are frequently associated with low-redshift lensing structures which are identified as false counterparts. We perform various analyses of the data, including the multiplicity of optical associations, the redshift and magnitude distributions in H-ATLAS in comparison to HerMES, and simulations of weak lensing, and we conclude that the effects are most likely to be explained by widespread weak lensing of Herschel-SPIRE sources by foreground structures. This has important consequences for counterpart identification and derived redshift distributions and luminosity functions of submm surveys.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 07/2014; 444(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: [Abridged] Aims: This work focuses on one lensed system, HATLAS J142935.3-002836 (H1429-0028), selected in the Herschel-ATLAS field. Gathering a rich, multi-wavelength dataset, we aim to confirm the lensing hypothesis and model the background source's morphology and dynamics, as well as to provide a full physical characterisation. Methods: Multi-wavelength high-resolution data is utilised to assess the nature of the system. A lensing-analysis algorithm which simultaneously fits different wavebands is adopted to characterise the lens. The background galaxy dynamical information is studied by reconstructing the 3-D source-plane of the ALMA CO(J:4-3) transition. Near-IR imaging from HST and Keck-AO allows to constrain rest-frame optical photometry independently for the foreground and background systems. Physical parameters (such as stellar and dust masses) are estimated via modelling of the spectral energy distribution taking into account source blending, foreground obscuration, and differential magnification. Results: The system comprises a foreground edge-on disk galaxy (at z_sp=0.218) with an almost complete Einstein ring around it. The background source (at z_sp=1.027) is magnified by a factor of ~8-10 depending on wavelength. It is comprised of two components and a tens of kpc long tidal tail resembling the Antennae merger. As a whole, the system is a massive stellar system (1.32[-0.41,+0.63] x1E11 Mo) forming stars at a rate of 394+-90 Mo/yr, and has a significant gas reservoir M_ISM = 4.6+-1.7 x1E10 Mo. Its depletion time due to star formation alone is thus expected to be tau_SF=M_ISM/SFR=117+-51 Myr. The dynamical mass of one of the components is estimated to be 5.8+-1.7 x1E10 Mo, and, together with the photometric total mass estimate, it implies that H1429-0028 is a major merger system (1:2.8[-1.5,+1.8]).
    06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present Keck-Adaptive Optics and Hubble Space Telescope high resolution near-infrared (IR) imaging for 500 um-bright candidate lensing systems identified by the Herschel Multi-tiered Extra-galactic Survey (HerMES) and Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Survey (H-ATLAS). Out of 87 candidates with near-IR imaging, 15 (~17%) display clear near-IR lensing morphologies. We present near-IR lens models to reconstruct and recover basic rest-frame optical morphological properties of the background galaxies from 12 new systems. Sources with the largest near-IR magnification factors also tend to be the most compact, consistent with the size bias predicted from simulations and pre- vious lensing models for sub-millimeter galaxies. For four new sources that also have high-resolution sub-mm maps, we test for differential lensing between the stellar and dust components and find that the 880 um magnification factor (u_880) is ~1.5 times higher than the near-IR magnification factor (u_NIR), on average. We also find that the stellar emission is ~2 times more extended in size than dust. The rest-frame optical properties of our sample of Herschel-selected lensed SMGs are consistent with those of unlensed SMGs, which suggests that the two populations are similar.
    06/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We present new deep images of the Coma Cluster from the ESA Herschel Space Observatory at wavelengths of 70, 100 and 160 microns, covering an area of 1.75 x 1.0 square degrees encompassing the core and southwest infall region. Our data display an excess of sources at flux densities above 100 mJy compared to blank-field surveys, as expected. We use extensive optical spectroscopy of this region to identify cluster members and hence produce cluster luminosity functions in all three photometric bands. We compare our results to the local field galaxy luminosity function, and the luminosity functions from the Herschel Virgo Cluster Survey (HeViCS). We find consistency between the shapes of the Coma and field galaxy luminosity functions at all three wavelengths, however we do not find the same level of agreement with that of the Virgo Cluster.
    05/2014; 442(2).
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    ABSTRACT: We have constructed a sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars from the Faint Im- ages Radio Sky at Twenty-one centimetres (FIRST) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), over the H-ATLAS Phase 1 Area (9h, 12h and 14.5h). Using a stacking analysis we find a significant correlation between the far-infrared luminosity and 1.4-GHz luminosity for radio-loud quasars. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution while for radio-quiet quasars no partial correlation is found. Using a single-temperature grey-body model we find a general trend of lower dust temperatures in the case of radio-loud quasars comparing to radio-quiet quasars. Also, radio-loud quasars are found to have almost constant mean values of dust mass along redshift and optical luminosity bins. In addition, we find that radio-loud quasars at lower optical luminosities tend to have on average higher FIR and 250-micron luminosity with respect to radio-quiet quasars with the same optical luminosites. Even if we use a two-temperature grey-body model to describe the FIR data, the FIR luminosity excess remains at lower optical luminosities. These results suggest that powerful radio jets are associated with star formation especially at lower accretion rates.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 04/2014; 442(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have constructed a sample of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars from the Faint Im- ages Radio Sky at Twenty-one centimetres (FIRST) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7), over the H-ATLAS Phase 1 Area (9h, 12h and 14.5h). Using a stacking analysis we find a significant correlation between the far-infrared luminosity and 1.4-GHz luminosity for radio-loud quasars. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution while for radio-quiet quasars no partial correlation is found. Using a single-temperature grey-body model we find a general trend of lower dust temperatures in the case of radio-loud quasars comparing to radio-quiet quasars. Also, radio-loud quasars are found to have almost constant mean values of dust mass along redshift and optical luminosity bins. In addition, we find that radio-loud quasars at lower optical luminosities tend to have on average higher FIR and 250-micron luminosity with respect to radio-quiet quasars with the same optical luminosites. Even if we use a two-temperature grey-body model to describe the FIR data, the FIR luminosity excess remains at lower optical luminosities. These results suggest that powerful radio jets are associated with star formation especially at lower accretion rates.
    03/2014;
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    ABSTRACT: We apply a chemical evolution model to investigate the sources and evolution of dust in a sample of 26 high-redshift ($z>1$) submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) from the literature, with complete photometry from ultraviolet to the submillimetre. We show that dust produced only by low-intermediate mass stars falls a factor 240 short of the observed dust masses of SMGs, the well-known `dust-budget crisis'. Adding an extra source of dust from supernovae can account for the dust mass in 19 per cent of the SMG sample. Even after accounting for dust produced by supernovae the remaining deficit in the dust mass budget provides support for higher supernova yields, substantial grain growth in the interstellar medium or a top-heavy IMF. Including efficient destruction of dust by supernova shocks increases the tension between our model and observed SMG dust masses. The models which best reproduce the physical properties of SMGs have a rapid build-up of dust from both stellar and interstellar sources and minimal dust destruction. Alternatively, invoking a top-heavy IMF or significant changes in the dust grain properties can solve the dust budget crisis only if dust is produced by both low mass stars and supernovae and is not efficiently destroyed by supernova shocks.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2014; 441(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present a comparison of the physical properties of a rest-frame $250\mu$m selected sample of massive, dusty galaxies from $0<z<5.3$. Our sample comprises 29 high-redshift submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) from the literature, and 843 dusty galaxies at $z<0.5$ from the Herschel-ATLAS, selected to have a similar stellar mass to the SMGs. The $z>1$ SMGs have an average SFR of $390^{+80}_{-70}\,$M$_\odot$yr$^{-1}$ which is 120 times that of the low-redshift sample matched in stellar mass to the SMGs (SFR$=3.3\pm{0.2}$ M$_\odot$yr$^{-1}$). The SMGs harbour a substantial mass of dust ($1.2^{+0.3}_{-0.2}\times{10}^9\,$M$_\odot$), compared to $(1.6\pm0.1)\times{10}^8\,$M$_\odot$ for low-redshift dusty galaxies. At low redshifts the dust luminosity is dominated by the diffuse ISM, whereas a large fraction of the dust luminosity in SMGs originates from star-forming regions. At the same dust mass SMGs are offset towards a higher SFR compared to the low-redshift H-ATLAS galaxies. This is not only due to the higher gas fraction in SMGs but also because they are undergoing a more efficient mode of star formation, which is consistent with their bursty star-formation histories. The offset in SFR between SMGs and low-redshift galaxies is similar to that found in CO studies, suggesting that dust mass is as good a tracer of molecular gas as CO.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 03/2014; 441(2). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a highly significant ($>10\sigma$) spatial correlation between galaxies with $S_{350\mu\rm m}\ge 30\,$mJy detected in the equatorial fields of the \textsl{Herschel} Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) with estimated redshifts $\gtrsim 1.5$, and SDSS or GAMA galaxies at $0.2\le z\le 0.6$. The significance of the cross-correlation is much higher than those reported so far for samples with non-overlapping redshift distributions selected in other wavebands. Extensive, realistic simulations of clustered sub-mm galaxies amplified by foreground structures confirm that the cross-correlation is explained by weak gravitational lensing ($\mu<2$). The simulations also show that the measured amplitude and range of angular scales of the signal are larger than can be accounted for by galaxy-galaxy weak lensing. However, for scales $\lesssim 2\,$arcmin, the signal can be reproduced if SDSS/GAMA galaxies act as signposts of galaxy groups/clusters with halo masses in the range ~$10^{13.2}$--$10^{14.5} M_{\odot}$. The signal detected on larger scales appears to reflect the clustering of such halos. Finally, we make use of our simulations to show that lensing can induce an apparent clustering of randomly distributed background galaxies, but the amplitude of the corresponding angular correlation function is at least a factor of 10 lower than observed for our sample of H-ATLAS galaxies. Moreover, although halos of group/cluster size are the dominant contributors to the cross-correlation between H-ATLAS and SDSS/GAMA galaxies, the gravitational magnification effects on counts of sub-mm sources are nevertheless dominated by galaxy-galaxy strong lensing.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2014; 442(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) Phase I data to study the conditional luminosity function of far-IR (250 um) selected galaxies in optically-selected galaxy groups from the GAMA spectroscopic survey, as well as environmental effects on the far-IR-to-optical colour. We applied two methods, which gave consistent results for the far-IR conditional luminosity functions. The direct matching method matches H-ATLAS sources to GAMA/SDSS galaxies, then links the optical counterparts to GAMA groups. The stacking method counts the number of far-IR sources within the projected radii of GAMA groups, subtracting the local background. We investigated the dependence of the far-IR (250 um) luminosity function on group mass in the range 10d12 < M_h < 10d14Msun/h and on redshift in the range 0 < z < 0.4, using a sample of 3000 groups containing H-ATLAS sources with GAMA redshifts over an area of 126 sq. deg. We find that the characteristic 250 um luminosity, L^*(250), increases with group mass up to M_h ~ 10d13Msun/h, but is roughly constant above this, while it increases with redshift at high group masses, but less so at low masses. We also find that the group far-IR luminosity-to-mass ratio L(250)/M_h increases with redshift and is higher in low-mass groups. We estimate that around 70% of the 250 um luminosity density in the local universe is contributed by groups with M_h > 10d12Msun/h. We also find that the far-IR-to-optical colours of H-ATLAS galaxies are independent of group mass over the range 10d12 < M_h <10d14Msun/h in the local universe. We also compare our observational results with recent semi-analytical models, and find that none of these galaxy formation model can reproduce the conditional far-IR luminosity functions of galaxy groups.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 01/2014; 442(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report on deep near-infrared observations obtained with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of the first five confirmed gravitational lensing events discovered by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). We succeed in disentangling the background galaxy from the lens to gain separate photometry of the two components. The HST data allow us to significantly improve on previous constraints of the mass in stars of the lensed galaxy and to perform accurate lens modelling of these systems, as described in the accompanying paper by Dye et al. We fit the spectral energy distributions of the background sources from near-IR to millimetre wavelengths and use the magnification factors estimated by Dye et al. to derive the intrinsic properties of the lensed galaxies. We find these galaxies to have star-formation rates of approximately 400 to 2000 M_sol/yr, with approximately (6-25)x10^10 M_sol of their baryonic mass already turned into stars. At these rates of star formation, all remaining molecular gas will be exhausted in less than 100 Myr, reaching a final mass in stars of a few 10^11 M_sol. These galaxies are thus proto-ellipticals caught during their major episode of star formation, and observed at the peak epoch z=1.5-3 of the cosmic star formation history of the Universe.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 11/2013; 440(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have determined the mass-density radial profiles of the first five strong gravitational lens systems discovered by the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS). We present an enhancement of the semi-linear lens inversion method of Warren & Dye which allows simultaneous reconstruction of several different wavebands and apply this to dual-band imaging of the lenses acquired with the Hubble Space Telescope. The five systems analysed here have lens redshifts which span a range, 0.22<z<0.94. Our findings are consistent with other studies by concluding that: 1) the logarithmic slope of the total mass density profile steepens with decreasing redshift; 2) the slope is positively correlated with the average total projected mass density of the lens contained within half the effective radius and negatively correlated with the effective radius; 3) the fraction of dark matter contained within half the effective radius increases with increasing effective radius and increases with redshift.
    11/2013; 440(3).
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    ABSTRACT: We use multiwavelength (0.12-500 μm) photometry from Herschel-ATLAS, WISE, UKIDSS, SDSS and GALEX to study 23 nearby spheroidal galaxies with prominent dust lanes (DLSGs). DLSGs are considered to be remnants of recent minor mergers, making them ideal laboratories for studying both the interstellar medium (ISM) of spheroids and minor-merger-driven star formation in the nearby Universe. The DLSGs exhibit star formation rates (SFRs) between 0.01 and 10 M⊙ yr-1, with a median of 0.26 M⊙ yr-1 (a factor of 3.5 greater than the average SG). The median dust mass, dust-to-stellar mass ratio and dust temperature in these galaxies are around 107.6 M⊙, ≈0.05 per cent and ≈19.5 K, respectively. The dust masses are at least a factor of 50 greater than that expected from stellar mass loss and, like the SFRs, show no correlation with galaxy luminosity, suggesting that both the ISM and the star formation have external drivers. Adopting literature gas-to-dust ratios and star formation histories derived from fits to the panchromatic photometry, we estimate that the median current and initial gas-to-stellar mass ratios in these systems are ≈4 and ≈7 per cent, respectively. If, as indicated by recent work, minor mergers that drive star formation in spheroids with (NUV - r) > 3.8 (the colour range of our DLSGs) have stellar mass ratios between 1:6 and 1:10, then the satellite gas fractions are likely ≥50 per cent.
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 10/2013; 435(2):1463-1468. · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We use galaxies from the Herschel-ATLAS survey, and a suite of ancillary simulations based on an isothermal dust model, to study our ability to determine the effective dust temperature, luminosity and emissivity index of 250um selected galaxies in the local Universe (z < 0.5). As well as simple far-infrared SED fitting of individual galaxies based on chi^2 minimisation, we attempt to derive the best global isothermal properties of 13,826 galaxies with reliable optical counterparts and spectroscopic redshifts. Using our simulations, we highlight the fact that applying traditional SED fitting techniques to noisy observational data in the Herschel Space Observatory bands introduces artificial anti-correlation between derived values of dust temperature and emissivity index. This is true even for galaxies with the most robust detections in our sample, making the results hard to interpret. We apply a method to determine the best-fit global values of isothermal effective temperature and emissivity index for z < 0.5 galaxies in H-ATLAS, deriving T = 22.3 +/- 0.1K and Beta = 1.98 +/- 0.02 (or T = 23.5 +/- 0.1K and Beta = 1.82 +/- 0.02 if we attempt to correct for bias by assuming that T and Beta are independent and normally distributed). We use our technique to test for an evolving emissivity index, finding only weak evidence. The median dust luminosity of our sample is log(Ldust/Lsolar) = 10.72 +/- 0.05 which (unlike T) shows little dependence on the choice of Beta used in our analysis, including whether it is variable or fixed. We use a further suite of simulations to emphasise the importance of the H-ATLAS PACS data for deriving dust temperatures at these redshifts, even though they are less sensitive than the SPIRE data. The majority of galaxies detected by H-ATLAS are normal star-forming galaxies, though a substantial minority (~31%) fall in the Luminous Infrared Galaxy category. (Abridged)
    Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 09/2013; 436(3). · 5.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Strong gravitational lenses are now being routinely discovered in wide-field surveys at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) high-spatial resolution imaging and Gemini-South and Multiple Mirror Telescope optical spectroscopy of strong lens candidates discovered in the two widest extragalactic surveys conducted by the Herschel Space Observatory: the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) and the Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES). From a sample of 30 Herschel sources with S_500>100 mJy, 21 are strongly lensed (multiply imaged), 4 are moderately lensed (singly imaged), and the remainder require additional data to determine their lensing status. We apply a visibility-plane lens modeling technique to the SMA data to recover information about the masses of the lenses as well as the intrinsic (i.e., unlensed) sizes (r_half) and far-infrared luminosities (L_FIR) of the lensed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs). The sample of lenses comprises primarily isolated massive galaxies, but includes some groups and clusters as well. Several of the lenses are located at z_lens>0.7, a redshift regime that is inaccessible to lens searches based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopy. The lensed SMGs are amplified by factors that are significantly below statistical model predictions given the 500um flux densities of our sample. We speculate that this may reflect a deficiency in our understanding of the intrinsic sizes and luminosities of the brightest SMGs. The lensed SMGs span nearly one decade in L_FIR (median L_FIR=7.9x10^12 L_sun) and two decades in FIR luminosity surface density (median Sigma_FIR=6.0x10^11 L_sun kpc^-2). The strong lenses in this sample and others identified via (sub-)mm surveys will provide a wealth of information regarding the astrophysics of galaxy formation and evolution over a wide range in redshift.
    The Astrophysical Journal 09/2013; 779(1). · 6.73 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

2k Citations
632.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • Imperial College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2012–2014
    • University of Canterbury
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Christchurch, Canterbury Region, New Zealand
    • Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
      • Department Physics and Astronomy
      New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
    • Paris Diderot University
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France
  • 2013
    • University of Maryland, College Park
      • Department of Astronomy
      Maryland, United States
  • 2011–2013
    • The Astronomical Observatory of Brera
      Merate, Lombardy, Italy
    • Leiden University
      • Leiden Observartory
      Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005–2013
    • University of Nottingham
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Nottigham, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011–2012
    • University of Hertfordshire
      • Centre for Astrophysics Research (CAR)
      Hatfield, England, United Kingdom
  • 2010–2011
    • Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM)
      • School of Astronomy
      Tehrān, Ostan-e Tehran, Iran
    • The University of Edinburgh
      • Institute for Astronomy (IfA)
      Edinburgh, SCT, United Kingdom
    • The Open University (UK)
      • Department of Physical Sciences
      Milton Keynes, England, United Kingdom
  • 1999–2011
    • Cardiff University
      • School of Physics and Astronomy
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
  • 2005–2010
    • University of California, Irvine
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      Irvine, California, United States
  • 2007
    • Northeast Institute of Geography and Agroecology
      • Purple Mountain Observatory
      Peping, Beijing, China
  • 2002–2003
    • University of Wales
      Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom