D.V. Novikov

St. Petersburg State University of Telecommunication, Sankt-Peterburg, St.-Petersburg, Russia

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Publications (11)2.22 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The graphite is a well known material for explosive emission cathodes due to the high stability and practically unlimited resource of emission ability. Such merits are resulted from the fact that during the explosive electron emission (EEE) a microrelief with nanometer microtips develops and it mainly conserves on the graphite after the process. However, the sustaining of liquid phase on graphite is possible only due to the high pressure of cathode plasma, since under natural conditions it sublimates by-passing the liquid phase. We have shown previously that nano-scale size tips of 10<sup>8</sup> sm<sup>-2</sup> surface density are formed at a liquid carbon surface at EEE. The purpose of this work was a more detailed study of the structure and composition of carbon nanoclusters on the surface of graphized polyacrylnitrile fibres by means of scanning electron and field emission microscopy. Emission characteristics of the carbon nanoclusters are studied in the EEE and field electron emission regimes. The field emission initiation threshold is found.
    Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2005. IVNC 2005. Technical Digest of the 18th International; 08/2005
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    ABSTRACT: The present work is devoted to the investigation of the characteristics of field emission from carbon nanoclusters (nanotubes, nanodiamonds and their composites) produced by cold destruction from natural graphite. Field emission microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the structure of the emitting surface. It was shown from the field emission image that this structure has high density of emission centers of approximately equal efficiency. Also, the field emission current varies with electric field, observed from current-voltage characteristics, in accordance with the Fowler-Nordheim law. Investigations of the emission properties of carbon nanoclusters confirmed that field emission from these materials takes place in electric fields more than two orders of magnitude lower than in metals and semiconductors. The current-voltage characteristics investigated in a wide range of currents (4 orders of magnitude) give a positive evidence that the mechanism of electron emission from these materials is linked to tunneling emission. No clear interpretation exists at the moment of the extremely low threshold field for the electron emission from carbon nanoclusters.
    Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2005. IVNC 2005. Technical Digest of the 18th International; 08/2005
  • G.N. Fursey, D.V. Novikov
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    ABSTRACT: This review includes: a general review of the state of affairs, and the analysis of main effects. A particular attention is given to: data on the low-threshold emission, analysis of the results of investigations of their field emission characteristics, discussion of proposed mechanisms of the field electron emission in these materials, analysis of current-voltage characteristics, data of field electron emission microscopy; data on the stability of field electron emission and its uniformity across the surface of field emission cathode arrays, analysis of the data on the structure and microgeometry of the surface. A special attention is paid to the most recent studies; the results of the research by the present authors are given as well.
    Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2005. IVNC 2005. Technical Digest of the 18th International; 08/2005
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    ABSTRACT: The characteristics of field emission from carbon nanoclusters (mainly nanotubes with open ends) produced by cold destruction from natural graphite are investigated. The specimen employed in the study is a coating of carbon nanocluster mixture in N-methylpirolidone upon a tungsten electrode. Field emission microscopy, electron microscopy, electron diffraction and IR spectroscopy are employed in structure studies of the carbon specimen. Investigation of the emission properties of the specimens confirmed that field emission from these materials takes place in electric fields more than two orders of magnitude lower than in metals and semiconductors. The mechanism of electron emission from these materials is evidently linked to tunneling emission.
    Vacuum Nanoelectronics Conference, 2004. IVNC 2004. Technical Digest of the 17th International; 08/2004
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    ABSTRACT: The present work is devoted to investigation of field emission features of carbon nanotubes produced directly on the arc cathode during arc discharge vaporization of graphite under conditions favorable for fullerene synthesis. Field emission microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were both employed in studies of the structure of the emitting surface. Field emission characteristics measured over an emission current range of four to five orders of magnitude closely follow linear dependencies in the Fowler–Nordheim coordinates. Direct observations of the emitting surface in a field emission microscope have revealed high density and uniformity of emission centers and very low operating voltages. Based on the electron microscopic data, it was shown that the anomalously low threshold for field emission cannot be explained from the geometrical factor.
    Applied Surface Science. 01/2003;
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    ABSTRACT: Electron microscopy is used in a study of nanoclusters of the carbon soot deposited on a probe in different areas of arc discharge during graphite vaporization under conditions favorable for fullerene synthesis. It is found that the spatial network of soot nanoclusters consists of alternating regions of higher density or associates of carbon particles. Two types of nanoclusters have been identified with the correlation radii of the associates equal to 0.6–0.8 and 1.6–2.2 nm, respectively. Type I nanoclusters are dominant in the soot microparticles, and their structure shows practically no variations with increasing separation r of the soot collector from the discharge axis over the range of distances studied, r=1–9 cm. The effective radius R 0 of the “elementary” particles making up the associates in the soot nanoclusters of Type I calculated with the use of scaling relationships is 0.15–0.17 nm and is close to the gas-kinetic radius of carbon atoms. Type II nanoclusters have been identified in soot collected at r>3 cm. Values of R 0 calculated in this case are 0.6–0.9 nm and decrease with increasing r, which indicates the presence of fullerene molecules in these nanocluster associates.
    Technical Physics 01/2002; 47(10):1337-1340. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Electron microscopy and electron diffraction methods were employed in a study of the structure of a fullerene-containing soot produced in gas discharge and of a C60 fullerene powder. The data obtained were analyzed with the use of fractal geometry concepts. It has been shown that, in the structure of the objects studied, several spatial scales can be identified. The effective radius of the structure’s “elementary particles” calculated using scaling relationships is equal to 6 Å for the soot and 4.5 Å for the C60 fullerene. The “elementary particles” combine into associates. The number of particles in an associate in both the soot and the C60 powder is not large (about 10). The associates form fractal nanoclusters 30–80 nm in size having a fractal dimension of 1.60±0.05 in the soot and of 1.8±0.05 in the C60 fullerene. The structure of the soot nanocluster is unstable and can be significantly modified by externally applied factors (e.g., as a result of treatment with toluene). The nanoclusters combine into aggregates having the form of branching cross-linked filaments. Eventually, these aggregates combine to form macroparticles of soot.
    Technical Physics 01/2000; 45(11):1489-1495. · 0.55 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An investigation is made of the possibility of obtaining technical-grade diamonds in ultrahigh-pressure apparatus by using the cathode deposits formed during fullerene production in an arc discharge as raw material. It is shown that carbon nanostructures present in the cathode deposit increase the number of diamond crystallization centers compared with standard graphite.
    Technical Physics Letters 01/1999; 25:174-175. · 0.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Carbon clusters, for example nanotubes, are interesting as field emitters because of it have small radius of curvature and sufficient height. Therefore factor of field amplification can allows getting the field emission from these formations at small voltage. Fullerenes, carbon clusters and particularly nanotubes are self-organizing structures, which basically permit on a completely new basis to create the field emission arrays. It was shown also that fullerene structures and nanotubes carbon cluster films have an electronic work function that is substantially lower that for graphite. These properties of the fullerene structure and nanotubes are of interest both for fundamental research into the emission mechanism and surface properties and for applied research into their possible utilization as efficient field emission cathodes in vacuum microelectronics
    Vacuum Microelectronics Conference, 1998. Eleventh International; 08/1998
  • G. N. Fursey, V. I. Petrick, D. V. Novikov
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    ABSTRACT: The field-emission characteristics of carbon nanoclusters (graphenes, nanotubes, their compositions with microdiamonds) produced by the cold destruction of natural graphite are studied. The structure of a coating of carbon nanoclusters on a tungsten cathode is examined by field emission microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electron diffraction. The high-intensity stable field emission of these clusters is shown to be characterized by a low field threshold. The mechanism of the low-threshold emission from carbon nanoclusters is discussed. PACS numbers36.40.Cg-61.46.+w-68.37.Vj-79.70.+q
    Technical Physics 54(7):1048-1051. · 0.55 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The graphite is a well-known material for explosive emission cathodes due to the high stability and practically unlimited resource of emission ability. Such merits are resulted from the fact that during the explosive electron emission (EEE) topography with nanometer microtips develops and it mainly conserves on the graphite after the process. We have shown previously that nanometer scale tips of 108 cm−2 surface density are formed at a liquid carbon surface at EEE. The purpose of this work was a more detailed study of the structure and composition of carbon nanoclusters on the surface of graphitized polyacrylonitrile fibers by means of scanning electron and field emission microscopy. Emission characteristics of the carbon nanoclusters are studied in the EEE and field electron emission regimes. The field emission initiation threshold is found.