Y S Kim

National Fusion Research Institute, Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea

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Publications (931)2844.62 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The divertor Infrared television (IR TV) system for monitoring the temperature of a divertor and localized hot spots will be installed on the upper port of the N-port in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The cassette of KSTAR makes a periscope inevitable for the divertor IR TV. In this article, 4 design concepts for the periscope were examined, and the design based on Keplerian was shown to have better stabilities in alignment and the vibration. The final optics design based on an f-theta lens, Keplerian, and telecentric lens was derived.
    Review of Scientific Instruments 10/2014; 85(11). · 1.60 Impact Factor
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    European Radiology 09/2014; 24(9):2118-2127. · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify novel genes regulated in diabetic nephropathy.
    European review for medical and pharmacological sciences. 08/2014; 18(15):2198-204.
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    ABSTRACT: journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party websites are prohibited. In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the article (e.g. in Word or Tex form) to their personal website or institutional repository. Authors requiring further information regarding Elsevier's archiving and manuscript policies are encouraged to visit: ABSTRACT Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell
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    ABSTRACT: Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) helps to maintain redox pools of ascorbate (AsA) by recycling dehydroascorbate (DHA) to AsA. To investigate whether DHAR influences the acquired tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stresses, cDNA encoding DHAR (OsDHAR1) was isolated from rice and used to develop OsDHAR1-overexpressing transgenic rice plants regulated by a maize ubiquitin promoter. The incorporation and expression of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, Western blot and enzyme activity. The overexpression of OsDHAR1 greatly increased the DHAR activity and the AsA/DHA ratio, following increase in AsA content and decrease in DHA content. In addition, the enzyme activity of monodehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase, which are related to the ascorbate–glutathione systems, was enhanced in the presence and the absence of salt stress in homozygous transgenic rice plants (OsDHAR1-OX1, -OX2) harbouring Ubi::OsDHAR1. In addition, OsDHAR1-expressing transgenic rice plants enhanced the redox state by reducing both hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde levels under salt and methyl viologen (MV) stress conditions, which led to better plant growth, ion leakage and quantum yield (Fv/Fm). Therefore, our results show that the overexpression of OsDHAR1 increases the adaptation of rice plants to salt stress, by maintaining the AsA pool, ion homoeostasis and redox homoeostasis. Finally, the findings of this study indicate that OsDHAR1 plays an important role in attenuating the deleterious effects of various abiotic stresses.
    Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 05/2014; · 2.62 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell types, namely α cells, β cells, δ cells, and other pancreatic cells that perform different functions, we used 3 different cell lines-NIT-1 (a β-cell line), α TC1 clone 6 (an α-cell line), and TGP52 (a pancreatic epithelial-like cell line)-which we cocultured in nonadhesive culture plates to produce hybrid cellular spheroids. These pseudo-islets had an oval shape and were morphologically similar to naïve islets; additionally, they expressed and secreted the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that pseudo-islets that mimic naïve islets can be successfully generated by a coculture method. These artificial islets can potentially be used for in vitro tests related to diabetes mellitus, specifically, in drug discovery or for investigating pathology. Moreover, they can be useful for examining basic questions pertaining to cell-cell interactions and tissue development.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2014; 46(4):1156-60. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vancomycin is the drug of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and shows time-dependent bacterial killing. The current study evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of vancomycin and explored its optimal dosing regimens by modeling and simulation. Pharmacokinetics study was performed for 20 patients who were treated with vancomycin intravenously, 1000 mg, every 12 h, and blood for PK was randomly drawn within prespecified time windows. PD study was in vitro time-kill experiment for vancomycin against 20 MRSA strains independent of the PK study, where bacterial titre was measured at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24 h after the beginning of vancomycin exposure at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32× minimum inhibitory concentrations. PK and PD models were built from each data set, and simulation for MRSA titre changes over time in human body was performed for various vancomycin dosing regimens using NONMEM(®) . Vancomycin followed a two-compartment PK model, and creatinine clearance was the significant covariate affecting the clearance of vancomycin. PD model described the in vitro time-kill data well. The PK/PD model predicted clear dose-response relationships of vancomycin. The therapeutic dosing regimens of vancomycin, suggested by the simulation studies, showed good agreement with the current clinical practice guidance, which indicates that this PK/PD modeling and simulation approach could prove useful for identifying optimal dosing regimens of other antibiotics and expediting novel antibiotic development. Using PD model from in vitro time-kill study and human PK model from phase 1 study, we could predict whether the drug is going to be efficacious or obtain insight into the optimal dosing regimens for a novel antibiotic agent in the early phases of drug development process.
    Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics 01/2014; · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell types, namely α cells, β cells, δ cells, and other pancreatic cells that perform different functions, we used 3 different cell lines—NIT-1 (a β-cell line), α TC1 clone 6 (an α-cell line), and TGP52 (a pancreatic epithelial-like cell line)—which we cocultured in nonadhesive culture plates to produce hybrid cellular spheroids. These pseudo-islets had an oval shape and were morphologically similar to naïve islets; additionally, they expressed and secreted the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that pseudo-islets that mimic naïve islets can be successfully generated by a coculture method. These artificial islets can potentially be used for in vitro tests related to diabetes mellitus, specifically, in drug discovery or for investigating pathology. Moreover, they can be useful for examining basic questions pertaining to cell-cell interactions and tissue development.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2014; 46(4):1156–1160. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A pipelined phase accumulator (PACC) for direct digital frequency synthesisers (DDFSs) is presented. A highly pipelined structure is inevitable in a PACC design to achieve high-speed performance, which causes a large number of pre-skewing flip-flops (F/Fs) and leads clock signals to be a large source of power dissipation. Since the input data do not change every single cycle, clock gating can save power by decreasing the number of unnecessary clock switching in the pre-skewing F/Fs. Sequential clock gating for pipelined PACCs is proposed. Compared with the conventional pipelined PACCs with and without clock gating, the proposed scheme reduces power dissipation by up to 55.4 and 77.2%, respectively, for the 32-bit 8-pipelinestage PACCs.
    Electronics Letters 11/2013; 49(23):1445-1446. · 1.04 Impact Factor
  • Y.S. Kim, J.L. Lee, H. Ahn, C.-S. Kim
    European Urology Supplements 11/2013; 12(6):137–138. · 3.37 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study was conducted to evaluate the relevance of the soluble form of c-Met protein, a truncated form of the c-Met membrane receptor involved in the CagA pathway, as a potential biomarker for gastric cancer. Among 290 gastric cancer case-control sets selected from the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort, the plasma concentrations of soluble c-Met protein were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Using analysis of variance and covariance models with age, sex, smoking, Helicobacter pylori infection, and CagA seropositivity, the mean concentrations of soluble c-Met protein between cases and controls were compared. To evaluate the association between gastric cancer and a c-Met protein level, odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. Interactions between CagA-related genes and the soluble c-Met protein concentration were also investigated. The overall median plasma concentration of soluble c-Met among cases was significantly lower than those of controls (1.390 vs. 1.610 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Closer to the onset of gastric cancer, the soluble c-Met protein level decreased linearly in a time-dependent manner (p for trend = 0.0002). The combined effects between the CagA-related genes and the soluble c-Met protein concentration significantly intensified risks for gastric cancer. Restricted analyses including cases that had been diagnosed within 1 year after entering the cohort had a fair degree of ability (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73–0.77) to discriminate gastric cancer cases from normal controls. Our findings demonstrate the potential of the soluble form of c-Met protein as a novel biomarker for gastric cancer. The beneficial effects of a high soluble c-Met concentration in human plasma are strongly supported.
    International Journal of Cancer 10/2013; · 6.20 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Graft nephrectomy is the last-resort option for renal transplant recipients. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical characteristics of patients who underwent graft nephrectomy according to the time after renal transplantation. From 2005 to 2012, 42 patients underwent graft nephrectomy after transplant failure. We divided these patients into early (n = 17) and late graft nephrectomy (n = 25) groups based on graft survival to 6 months, comparing their causes for nephrectomy and clinical characteristics. The patients included 29 men and 13 women, with an overall mean age of 45 years (range, 10-71 years). The main causes for early and late graft nephrectomy were irreversible acute rejection (71%) and graft intolerance syndrome (95%), respectively. The clinical characteristics did not significantly differ between the early and late graft nephrectomy groups except for operative-related complications. Bleeding was more common among patients who underwent early (n = 10) versus late (n = 3) graft nephrectomy (59% vs 12%; P = .01). Of the 10 patients with perioperative bleeding, 8 had a bleeding tendency, such as low platelet count or prolonged prothrombin time at the time of the operation. These complications occurred after antirejection therapy involving plasma exchange or antithymocyte globulin treatment. Allograft nephrectomy was associated with a mortality rate of 2.38%. The cause for graft nephrectomy and type of perioperative complication differed according to timing of graft nephrectomy. Antirejection therapy appeared to contribute to postoperative complications such as bleeding.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2013; 45(8):2953-6. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of three-dimensional (3-D) contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) to assess renal parenchyma, arterial inflow stenosis, and peritransplant fluid collections in the early period after kidney transplantation (KT). Between January 2010 and April 2011, we examined a consecutive series of 144 renal transplants using 3-D CE MRA at 14 days after KT. MRA showed parenchyma infarctions (n = 17, 11.8%), arterial inflow stenoses (n = 23, 16%), lymphoceles (n = 14, 9.7%), and hematomas (n = 6, 4.2%). The degree of renal transplant artery inflow stenosis was graded qualitatively based on diameter criterion; <50% = mild, 50% to 70% = moderate, and >70% = severe in 10 (6.9%), 5 (3.5%), and 8 (5.6%) subjects, respectively. The study recipients were divided into 3 groups according to the degree of renal artery inflow stenosis (group I: normal; group II: mild and moderate, <70%; group III: severe, >70%). Among group III patients who underwent digital subtraction angiography, 5 had percutaneous transluminal angioplasty or stenting performed after 1 month. Their mean resume creatinine levels at 1, 6, and 12 months after transplantation were not significantly different from those in the other groups (P = .391, .447, .110). The prevalence of graft loss (n = 2) was high in group III (P = .012), although the frequency of acute rejection episodes was not different among the groups (P = .890). The incidences of renal parenchyma infarction, peritransplant fluid collection and arterial inflow stenosis were unexpectedly high in the early period after KT. Thus, 3-D CE MRA provided a rapid global assessment of the renal parenchyma, transplant arterial system, and peritransplant fluid collection that can be helpful to detect or exclude many causes of renal transplant dysfunction.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2013; 45(8):2925-30. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Investigators conducting diabetes-related research have focused on islet transplantation as a radical therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic islet isolation, an essential process, is a very demanding work because of the proteolytic enzymes, species, treatment time, and individual difference. Replacement of primary isolated pancreatic islets must be carried out continuously for various in vitro tests, making primary isolated islets a useful tool for cell transplantation research. Hence, we sought to develop pseudoislets from commercial pancreas-derived cell lines. In this study, we used RIN-5F and RIN-m cells, which secrete insulin, somatostatin, or glucagon. To manufacture hybrid cellular spheroids, the cells were cultured under hanging drop plate and nonadhesive plate methods. We observed that hybrid cellular pseudoislets exhibited an oval shape, with sizes ranging from 590 to 1200 μm. Their morphology was similar to naïve islets. Cell line pseudoislets secreted and expressed insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunohistochemistry analyses. Thus, the current artificially manufactured biomimetic pseudoislets resembled pancreatic islets of the endocrine system, appearing as cellular aggregates that secreted insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin. Enhanced immunoisolation techniques may lead to the development of new islet sources for pancreatic transplantation through this pseudoislet strategy.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2013; 45(8):3113-7. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: With the increased numbers of kidney transplantations, more patients return to dialysis after graft loss (DAGL). The aim of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of peritoneal dialysis (PD) after graft loss compared with transplant-naive PD patients (TN-PD). This study was conducted on 715 patients who started PD between 1988 and 2009, including 47 who started PD after allograft loss (DAGL-PD) and 668 in the (TN-PD) group. The mean ages were 40.8 ± 10.7 in DAGL-PD group and 51.03 ± 14.20 in TN-PD group (P < .01). The most common cause of end-stage renal disease in DAGL was primary glomerulonephritis (76.6%), but it was diabetes mellitus (38.9%) in the TN-PD group (P < .05). Patient survival rates at 1, 5, and 10 years were not different: 100%, 86%, and 57% versus 91%, 70%, and 62%, respectively. PD survival rate at 1, 5, and 10 years did not show significant differences: 98%, 95%, and 88% versus 95%, 80%, and 66%, respectively. The most common causes of death in both groups were infection (DAGL, 26.7%; TN-PD, 24.5%) followed by cardiovascular disease (DAGL, 20.0%; TN-PD, 19.6%); the distribution of causes did not differ significantly (P > .05). The clinical outcomes of PD in DAGL group were comparable with those of TN-PD patients. Therefore, PD could be considered as a dialysis modality for patients who experience allograft failure.
    Transplantation Proceedings 10/2013; 45(8):2949-52. · 0.95 Impact Factor
  • European Neuropsychopharmacology 10/2013; 23:S501. · 4.60 Impact Factor
  • Y.S. KIM, B.I. KIM, H.K. KWON
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Previous studies reported that mature plaque related with periodontal disease emited red fluorescence by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) using 405 nm. However, there researches about red fluorescence and cariogenic process. The aim of this study was to the association between red fluorescence detected by QLF-Digital (QLF-D) and demineralization caused by cariogenic microcosm biofilm model, Method: Microcosm biofilm were initiated from the saliva of single donor, grown up to 10 days on bovine specimens in 24-well platebasal medium mucin with 0.5% sucrose. The red fluorescence biofilm was evaluated as Red/Green (R/G) ratio image . emineralization of specimens measured by the lesion depth polarized light microscope (PLM) and Vickers hardness numbers (VHN) surface micro-hardness tester. The associations between each variable were evaluated by Pearson's correlations coefficients, Result: The R/G ratio from biofilms constantly increased from 0 to 2.0 until the 10thday. PLM image analysis, lesion depth increased from 25.5 micrometer to 164.7 micrometer 10thday.ΔVHN was increased from 96.5 1st day to 309.8 10th day. The R/G ratio was significantly correlated with lesion depth (r=0.82, p=0.001) and ΔVHN (r=0.65, p=0.001), Conclusion: In conclusion, there significant association between red fluorescence detected by QLF-D and demineralization cariogenic microcosm biofilm model.
    IADR Asia/Pacific Region (APR) Regional Meeting and Co-Annual Scientific Meeting of IADR Divisions 2013; 08/2013
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    ABSTRACT: Frequency modulation reflectometer has been developed to measure the plasma density profile of the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. Three reflectometers are operating in extraordinary polarization mode in the frequency range of Q band (33.6-54 GHz), V band (48-72 GHz), and W band (72-108 GHz) to measure the density up to 7 × 10(19) m(-3) when the toroidal magnetic field is 2 T on axis. The antenna is installed inside of the vacuum vessel. A new vacuum window is developed by using 50 μm thick mica film and 0.1 mm thick gold gasket. The filter bank of low pass filter, notch filter, and Faraday isolator is used to reject the electron cyclotron heating high power at attenuation of 60 dB. The full frequency band is swept in 20 μs. The mixer output is directly digitized with sampling rate of 100 MSamples/s. The phase is obtained by using wavelet transform. The whole hardware and software system is described in detail and the measured density profile is presented as a result.
    The Review of scientific instruments 08/2013; 84(8):084702. · 1.52 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Handheld pointing devices are increasingly in demand in digital TV market to provide intuitive human-device interfaces (HDIs). HDIs with directional buttons, joysticks, and trackballs are not very intuitive owing to their limited motions. To overcome this problem, cameras, gyroscopes, or ultrasonic sensors have been incorporated into HDIs at the expense of higher power consumption. In this paper, a low-power intuitive pointing device is presented. The transmitter of the proposed device consists of a microcontroller, two infrared light-emitting diodes, and optical components. The receiver comprises a photodiode module and a motion estimation block. The proposed device reduces power consumption by 71.3% and 23.6% as compared with the conventional camera- and gyroscope-based HDIs, respectively. Test results and performance evaluations are presented for validation.
    IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics 08/2013; 59(3):699-704. · 1.09 Impact Factor
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    MS Lee, KH Park, MH Jung, YS Kim
    Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control. 06/2013; 2(1).

Publication Stats

13k Citations
2,844.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • National Fusion Research Institute
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
    • Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI)
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
    • Chung-Ang University Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Hanil General Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2004–2014
    • Kyungpook National University
      • School of Mechanical Engineering
      Daikyū, Daegu, South Korea
    • University of Manitoba
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 1992–2014
    • Yonsei University
      • • College of Dentistry
      • • Research Institute for Trasplantation
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2013
    • National Cancer Center Korea
      Kōyō, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
    • Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
  • 2009–2013
    • Konkuk University
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine
      • • School of Physics
      • • Department of Environmental Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Gachon University
      Sŏngnam, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
    • NCI-Frederick
      Maryland, United States
  • 1997–2013
    • Chung-Ang University
      • • School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering
      • • Department of Physics
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States
    • Osaka City University
      • First Department of Surgery
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 1993–2013
    • University of Ulsan
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Department of Family Medicine
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
    • Asan Medical Center
      • Department of Urology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Minnesota Duluth
      • Medical School
      Duluth, Minnesota, United States
  • 2012
    • Kwandong University
      Gangneung, Gangwon, South Korea
    • Konkuk University Medical Center
      Changnyeong, South Gyeongsang, South Korea
  • 2005–2012
    • Gyeongsang National University
      • Division of Applied Life Science
      Shinshū, South Gyeongsang, South Korea
    • Myongji Hospital
      Kōyō, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
    • University of Suwon
      • Department of Chemical Engineering
      Suigen, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
  • 1999–2012
    • Korea University
      • • Department of Computer Science and Radio Communications Engineering
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Chemistry
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Incheon St. Mary’s Hospital, Catholic Medical Center
      Bucheon, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
    • Kyoto University
      • Department of Materials Science and Engineering
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan
  • 1998–2012
    • Ulsan University Hospital
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis
      Bethesda, MD, United States
  • 1997–2012
    • Hanyang University
      • • Department of Nuclear Engineering
      • • Department of Biomedical Engineering
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Major in Internal Medicine
      Ansan, Gyeonggi, South Korea
  • 1995–2012
    • Seoul National University
      • • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      • • School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Iowa
      • Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation
      Iowa City, Iowa, United States
    • Pohang Accelerator Laboratory
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
  • 1993–2012
    • Catholic University of Korea
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2010–2011
    • Pusan National University
      • • Department of Nuclear Medicine
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Pusan, Busan, South Korea
    • Inha University
      • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Kyung Hee University Medical Center
      • Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
      • Advanced Light Source Facility
      Berkeley, CA, United States
  • 2007–2011
    • Sungkyunkwan University
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • School of Medicine
      • • School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering (AMSE)
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Eulji University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2006–2011
    • Daewoo Engineering and Construction
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Chonnam National University Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1995–2011
    • Seoul National University Hospital
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Neuropsychiatry
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2004–2010
    • Andong National University
      Antō, North Gyeongsang, South Korea
  • 1996–2010
    • Hallym University
      • College of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Kagoshima University
      Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 1992–2010
    • Yonsei University Hospital
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Surgery
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2008
    • National Fisheries Research and Development Institution
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • The Seoul Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Korea Food Research Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2006–2008
    • Ewha Womans University
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Department of Life Sciences
      • • Center for Intelligent Nano-Bio Materials(CINBM)
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2001–2008
    • Chosun University
      Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea
    • Korean Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Kyung Hee University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Konyang University
      • College of Medicine
      Nonsan, South Chungcheong, South Korea
  • 1999–2008
    • Ajou University
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Urology
      • • Department of Gastroenterology
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1995–2007
    • Soonchunhyang University
      • College of Medicine
      Onyang, South Chungcheong, South Korea
  • 1993–2007
    • Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital
      • Department of Gastroenterology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2001–2006
    • Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology
      Usan-ri, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
    • Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
  • 1998–2005
    • Pohang University of Science and Technology
      • • Pohang Accelerator Laboratory
      • • Department of Life Sciences
      Andong, North Gyeongsang, South Korea
  • 1996–2005
    • Chonbuk National University
      • Department of Chemical Engineering
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2003
    • Hongik University
      • Department of Science
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Seoul
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1997–2003
    • Kookmin University
      • School of Advanced Materials Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2002
    • Chonnam National University
      • Department of Biology
      Yeoju, Gyeonggi, South Korea
  • 2001–2002
    • Korea Basic Science Institute KBSI
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1999–2001
    • Hanyang University Medical Center
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1998–2001
    • Université des Sciences et Technologies de Lille 1
      • Unité de Glycobiologie Structurale et Fonctionnelle (UGSF)
      Lille, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
  • 1994–2001
    • Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      • • Department of Biological Sciences
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire
      Strasburg, Alsace, France
  • 1983–2001
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Veterans Affairs Medical Center
      • • Division of Hospital Medicine
      • • Department of Anatomy
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 2000
    • Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Hospital
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
    • Kunsan National University
      • Department of Physics
      Gunzan, North Jeolla, South Korea
  • 1998–2000
    • Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology KRIBB
      • • Plant Cell Biotechnology Laboratory
      • • Plant Cell and Molecular Biology Research Unit
      Ansan, Gyeonggi, South Korea
  • 1990–2000
    • University College London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1987–1999
    • San Francisco VA Medical Center
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 1995–1998
    • Kanazawa Medical University
      • Department of Pathology
      Kanazawa-shi, Ishikawa-ken, Japan
    • International St. Mary's Hospitals
      Chemulpo, Incheon, South Korea
  • 1994–1996
    • University of Minnesota Twin Cities
      • Department of Medicine
      Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • 1994–1995
    • Soroka Medical Center
      • Department of Gastroenterology
      Be'er Sheva`, Southern District, Israel
  • 1986–1988
    • New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities
      • Department of Psychology
      New York City, New York, United States