Y S Kim

National Fusion Research Institute, Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea

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Publications (904)2467.13 Total impact

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  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection of the musculoskeletal tissue is a rare disease. An early and accurate diagnosis is often difficult because of the indolent clinical course and difficulty of isolating pathogens. Our goal was to determine the clinical features of musculoskeletal NTM infection and to present the treatment outcomes. A total of 29 patients (nine females, 20 males between 34 and 85 years old, mean age 61.7 years; 34 to 85) with NTM infection of the musculoskeletal system between 1998 to 2011 were identified and their treatment retrospectively analysed. Microbiological studies demonstrated NTM in 29 patients: the isolates were Mycobacterium intracellulare in six patients, M. fortuitum in three, M. abscessus in two and M. marinum in one. In the remaining patients we failed to identify the species. The involved sites were the hand/wrist in nine patients the knee in five patients, spine in four patients, foot in two patients, elbow in two patients, shoulder in one, ankle in two patients, leg in three patients and multiple in one patient. The mean interval between the appearance of symptoms and diagnosis was 20.8 months (1.5 to 180). All patients underwent surgical treatment and antimicrobial medication according to our protocol for chronic musculoskeletal infection: 20 patients had NTM-specific medication and nine had conventional antimicrobial therapy. At the final follow-up 22 patients were cured, three failed to respond to treatment and four were lost to follow-up. Identifying these diseases due the initial non-specific presentation can be difficult. Treatment consists of surgical intervention and adequate antimicrobial therapy, which can result in satisfactory outcomes. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2014;96-B:1561-5.
    11/2014; 96-B(11):1561-5. DOI:10.1302/0301-620X.96B11.33427
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    ABSTRACT: The divertor Infrared television (IR TV) system for monitoring the temperature of a divertor and localized hot spots will be installed on the upper port of the N-port in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR). The cassette of KSTAR makes a periscope inevitable for the divertor IR TV. In this article, 4 design concepts for the periscope were examined, and the design based on Keplerian was shown to have better stabilities in alignment and the vibration. The final optics design based on an f-theta lens, Keplerian, and telecentric lens was derived.
    Review of Scientific Instruments 10/2014; 85(11). DOI:10.1063/1.4886772 · 1.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In chloroplasts and mitochondria, antioxidant mechanisms include the ascorbate-glutathione cycle, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) is important for regeneration of ascorbate (AsA) from monodehydroascorbate (MDHA). To improve detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), we established a construct of the MDHAR gene from Brassica rapa fused to the targeting signal peptides of Pisum sativum glutathione reductase (GR), which was controlled by a stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter, and introduced this expression system into Arabidopsis thaliana. Transgenic (TG) plants overexpressing BrMDHAR targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria through signal peptides showed an elevated MDHAR activity and an increased ratio of AsA to dehydroascorbate (DHA) when compared to wild-type (WT) plants under a freezing stress. These led to increased photosynthetic parameters, redox homeostasis, and biomass in TG plants when compared to the WT plants. Our results suggest that the overexpression of the BrMDHAR gene targeted to chloroplasts and mitochondria conferred an enhanced tolerance against the freezing stress, and a stress adaptation of dual-targeted BrMDHAR was better than that of single BrMDHAR.
    Biologia Plantarum 09/2014; 58(3):456-468. DOI:10.1007/s10535-014-0416-7 · 1.74 Impact Factor
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    European Radiology 09/2014; 24(9):2118-2127. · 4.34 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To identify novel genes regulated in diabetic nephropathy.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND The prevalence and economic burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are increasing worldwide. However, little information is available concerning COPD-associated health care use and costs in Korea. OBJECTIVE To analyse 1) health care use, medical costs and medication use in 2009, and 2) changes in costs and medication use over 5 years (2006–2010). DESIGNUsing the database of the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service, COPD patients were identified by searching on both ICD-10 codes and COPD medication. RESULTSA total of 192 496 COPD patients were identified in 2009. Total medical costs per person were US$2803 ± 3865; the average annual number of days of out-patient care and days of hospitalisation were respectively 40 ± 36 and 11 ± 33. Methylxanthine and systemic beta-agonists were the most frequently used drugs. However, the number of prescriptions for long-acting muscarinic antagonist increased rapidly. The total cost of COPD-related medications increased by 33.1% over 5 years. CONCLUSION The present study provides new insight into health care use and the economic burden of COPD in Korea. Changing patterns of COPD-related medication use could help inform COPD management policies.
    The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease 06/2014; 18(6). DOI:10.5588/ijtld.13.0634 · 2.76 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party websites are prohibited. In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the article (e.g. in Word or Tex form) to their personal website or institutional repository. Authors requiring further information regarding Elsevier's archiving and manuscript policies are encouraged to visit: ABSTRACT Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell
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    ABSTRACT: In this letter, a new resonant ground structure (RGS) based on a cavity-backed DGS is proposed. The proposed RGS is similar to a DGS and is modeled by a parallel RLC resonance circuit. Since the proposed RGS utilizes a substrate-filled metallic cavity (SFMC) underneath the DGS, it leads to no back-radiation and high quality factor. The frequency responses and structural parameters are analyzed and verified via simulation and measurement. The quality factor of the proposed RGS with a spiral-shaped defect is larger than that of the DGS with the same defect by a factor of 7.4.
    IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters 05/2014; 24(5):321-323. DOI:10.1109/LMWC.2014.2309079 · 2.24 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell types, namely α cells, β cells, δ cells, and other pancreatic cells that perform different functions, we used 3 different cell lines-NIT-1 (a β-cell line), α TC1 clone 6 (an α-cell line), and TGP52 (a pancreatic epithelial-like cell line)-which we cocultured in nonadhesive culture plates to produce hybrid cellular spheroids. These pseudo-islets had an oval shape and were morphologically similar to naïve islets; additionally, they expressed and secreted the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that pseudo-islets that mimic naïve islets can be successfully generated by a coculture method. These artificial islets can potentially be used for in vitro tests related to diabetes mellitus, specifically, in drug discovery or for investigating pathology. Moreover, they can be useful for examining basic questions pertaining to cell-cell interactions and tissue development.
    Transplantation Proceedings 05/2014; 46(4):1156-60. DOI:10.1016/j.transproceed.2013.11.074 · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR, EC 1.8.5.1) helps to maintain redox pools of ascorbate (AsA) by recycling dehydroascorbate (DHA) to AsA. To investigate whether DHAR influences the acquired tolerance of rice plants to abiotic stresses, cDNA encoding DHAR (OsDHAR1) was isolated from rice and used to develop OsDHAR1-overexpressing transgenic rice plants regulated by a maize ubiquitin promoter. The incorporation and expression of the transgene was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and semi-quantitative reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, Western blot and enzyme activity. The overexpression of OsDHAR1 greatly increased the DHAR activity and the AsA/DHA ratio, following increase in AsA content and decrease in DHA content. In addition, the enzyme activity of monodehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate peroxidase, which are related to the ascorbate–glutathione systems, was enhanced in the presence and the absence of salt stress in homozygous transgenic rice plants (OsDHAR1-OX1, -OX2) harbouring Ubi::OsDHAR1. In addition, OsDHAR1-expressing transgenic rice plants enhanced the redox state by reducing both hydroperoxide and malondialdehyde levels under salt and methyl viologen (MV) stress conditions, which led to better plant growth, ion leakage and quantum yield (Fv/Fm). Therefore, our results show that the overexpression of OsDHAR1 increases the adaptation of rice plants to salt stress, by maintaining the AsA pool, ion homoeostasis and redox homoeostasis. Finally, the findings of this study indicate that OsDHAR1 plays an important role in attenuating the deleterious effects of various abiotic stresses.
    Journal of Agronomy and Crop Science 05/2014; 200(6). DOI:10.1111/jac.12078 · 2.62 Impact Factor
  • Journal of Crohn s and Colitis 02/2014; 8:S258. DOI:10.1016/S1873-9946(14)60579-1 · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In recent decades, the safety of ships at sea has become a major concern of the global maritime industries. Ships are rarely subject to severe accidents during their life cycle. Collision is one of the most hazardous accidents, with potentially serious consequences such as the loss of human life, structural damage and environmental damage, especially if large tankers, LNG and/or nuclear-powered vessels are involved. This study presents a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) for double hull oil tankers that have collided with different types of ships. The methodology used to perform the QRA is based on the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) definition of a Formal Safety Assessment (FSA). Using probabilistic approaches, ship-ship collision scenarios are randomly selected to create a representative sample of all possible scenarios. The collision frequency is then calculated for each scenario. As this is a virtual experiment, the LS-DYNA nonlinear finite element method (NLFEM) is used to predict the structural consequences of each scenario selected. In addition, the environmental consequences are estimated by calculating the size of each scenario's oil spill. To assess the economic consequences, the property and environmental damages are calculated in terms of monetary units. The total risk is then calculated as the sum of the resultant structural and environmental damages. Exceedance curves are established that can be used to define the collision design loads in association with various design criteria.
  • Molecular Cancer Therapeutics 01/2014; 12(11_Supplement):A63-A63. DOI:10.1158/1535-7163.TARG-13-A63 · 6.11 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Vancomycin is the drug of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and shows time-dependent bacterial killing. The current study evaluated the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of vancomycin and explored its optimal dosing regimens by modeling and simulation. Pharmacokinetics study was performed for 20 patients who were treated with vancomycin intravenously, 1000 mg, every 12 h, and blood for PK was randomly drawn within prespecified time windows. PD study was in vitro time-kill experiment for vancomycin against 20 MRSA strains independent of the PK study, where bacterial titre was measured at 0, 2, 4, 8, 24 h after the beginning of vancomycin exposure at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 32× minimum inhibitory concentrations. PK and PD models were built from each data set, and simulation for MRSA titre changes over time in human body was performed for various vancomycin dosing regimens using NONMEM(®) . Vancomycin followed a two-compartment PK model, and creatinine clearance was the significant covariate affecting the clearance of vancomycin. PD model described the in vitro time-kill data well. The PK/PD model predicted clear dose-response relationships of vancomycin. The therapeutic dosing regimens of vancomycin, suggested by the simulation studies, showed good agreement with the current clinical practice guidance, which indicates that this PK/PD modeling and simulation approach could prove useful for identifying optimal dosing regimens of other antibiotics and expediting novel antibiotic development. Using PD model from in vitro time-kill study and human PK model from phase 1 study, we could predict whether the drug is going to be efficacious or obtain insight into the optimal dosing regimens for a novel antibiotic agent in the early phases of drug development process.
    Journal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics 01/2014; DOI:10.1111/jcpt.12123 · 2.10 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Pancreatic islets have been the focus of recent studies exploring the pathologic mechanisms of diabetes mellitus as well as more effective and radical treatments for this disease. Islet transplantation is a promising therapeutic strategy; however, isolation of pancreatic islets for this purpose has been challenging, because the technique is time consuming and technically difficult, and tissue handling can be variable. Pseudo-islets can be used as an alternative to naïve islets, but require cellular sources or artificial materials. In this study, pancreas-derived cells were used to generate pseudo-islets. Because the pancreas is composed of a variety of cell types, namely α cells, β cells, δ cells, and other pancreatic cells that perform different functions, we used 3 different cell lines—NIT-1 (a β-cell line), α TC1 clone 6 (an α-cell line), and TGP52 (a pancreatic epithelial-like cell line)—which we cocultured in nonadhesive culture plates to produce hybrid cellular spheroids. These pseudo-islets had an oval shape and were morphologically similar to naïve islets; additionally, they expressed and secreted the pancreatic hormones insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results demonstrate that pseudo-islets that mimic naïve islets can be successfully generated by a coculture method. These artificial islets can potentially be used for in vitro tests related to diabetes mellitus, specifically, in drug discovery or for investigating pathology. Moreover, they can be useful for examining basic questions pertaining to cell-cell interactions and tissue development.
    Transplantation Proceedings 01/2014; 46(4):1156–1160. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Arabidopsis gene AVP1 encodes a vacuolar H+-translocating inorganic pyrophosphatase (enzyme classification (EC) 3.6.1.1) that functions as an electronic proton pump in the vacuolar membrane and affects growth development and the stress response in plants. The current study was conducted to evaluate the molecular properties of the Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (AVP1) gene in rice (Oryza sativa L.). Incorporation and expression of the transgene was confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantitative real-time PCR. Expression of the AVP1 gene in transgenic rice plants (TRP1 and TRP2) resulted in a significantly enhanced tolerance to 5.8 g/l NaCl under greenhouse conditions when compared with the control wild-type (WT) rice plants. Augmented AVP1 expression in the transgenic rice plants (TRP) also affected total biomass and improved ion homoeostasis through increased accumulation of Na+ ions in whole tissues when compared with control WT rice plants under high salinity conditions. The photochemical yield (Fv/Fm) values of TRP were higher than those of the WT rice plants, even though the values decreased over time in both the WT and transgenic (TRP1 to TRP8) rice plants. Furthermore, rice grain yield and biomass of the TRP were at least 15% higher based on culm and root weights, and panicle and spikelet numbers when compared with those of the WT rice plants during the 2010 and 2010 growing seasons in South Korea. Thus, these results suggest that ectopic AVP1 expression conferred tolerance and stress resistance to genetically modified transgenic crop plants by improving cellular ion homoeostasis in response to saline conditions, which enhanced rice yield and biomass under natural conditions in paddy fields.
    The Journal of Agricultural Science 12/2013; 152(06):941-953. DOI:10.1017/S0021859613000671 · 2.89 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A pipelined phase accumulator (PACC) for direct digital frequency synthesisers (DDFSs) is presented. A highly pipelined structure is inevitable in a PACC design to achieve high-speed performance, which causes a large number of pre-skewing flip-flops (F/Fs) and leads clock signals to be a large source of power dissipation. Since the input data do not change every single cycle, clock gating can save power by decreasing the number of unnecessary clock switching in the pre-skewing F/Fs. Sequential clock gating for pipelined PACCs is proposed. Compared with the conventional pipelined PACCs with and without clock gating, the proposed scheme reduces power dissipation by up to 55.4 and 77.2%, respectively, for the 32-bit 8-pipelinestage PACCs.
    Electronics Letters 11/2013; 49(23):1445-1446. DOI:10.1049/el.2013.2588 · 1.07 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A high-voltage extended drain MOS (EDMOS) transistor with a dual work function gate (DWFG) is discussed. This device enhances device performance by modifying the electric field in the channel. For DWFG EDMOS device fabrication, the polycrystalline silicon gates on the source and drain sides are doped by p + and n + ion implantation, respectively. Experimental results from the fabricated DWFG EDMOS devices show improved transconductance (gm), drain conductance (gds) and specific on-resistance (RON) characteristics without breakdown voltage reduction.
    Electronics Letters 11/2013; 49(23):1486-1487. DOI:10.1049/el.2013.1301 · 1.07 Impact Factor
  • Y.S. Kim, J.L. Lee, H. Ahn, C.-S. Kim
    European Urology Supplements 11/2013; 12(6):137–138. DOI:10.1016/S1569-9056(13)62348-9 · 3.37 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

13k Citations
2,467.13 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011–2014
    • National Fusion Research Institute
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
    • Hanil General Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Chung-Ang University Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Inje University Paik Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2009–2014
    • Konkuk University
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine
      • • School of Physics
      • • Department of Environmental Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Wonkwang University
      Riri, North Jeolla, South Korea
  • 1998–2014
    • Kyungpook National University
      • • School of Mechanical Engineering
      • • College of Natural Sciences
      • • Department of Oral Physiology
      Daikyū, Daegu, South Korea
    • University of California, San Diego
      • Department of Radiology
      San Diego, CA, United States
    • Chungnam National University
      • Department of Biochemistry
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
    • Tohoku University
      • Department of Communication Engineering
      Miyagi, Japan
  • 1994–2014
    • Korea University
      • • Department of Computer Science and Radio Communications Engineering
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
      • • Department of Chemistry
      • • Department of Anatomy
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Ulsan
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Department of Materials Engineering
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
    • Kobe University
      • Division of Biochemistry
      Kōbe, Hyōgo, Japan
  • 1992–2014
    • Yonsei University
      • • Department of Radiation Oncology
      • • The Institute of Chest Diseases
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Department of Biochemistry
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • College of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Yonsei University Hospital
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Surgery
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2013
    • Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
  • 2009–2013
    • Gachon University
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Sŏngnam, Gyeonggi Province, South Korea
  • 1999–2013
    • Asan Medical Center
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Kyoto University
      • Department of Materials Science and Engineering
      Kyoto, Kyoto-fu, Japan
    • Hallym University Medical Center
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1998–2013
    • Ulsan University Hospital
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
  • 1997–2013
    • Chung-Ang University
      • • School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering
      • • Department of Physics
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • National Human Genome Research Institute
      Maryland, United States
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      New York, New York, United States
  • 1994–2013
    • Catholic University of Korea
      • • Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2012
    • Konkuk University Medical Center
      Changnyeong, South Gyeongsang, South Korea
    • Kosin University
      Tsau-liang-hai, Busan, South Korea
  • 2011–2012
    • Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI)
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
  • 2010–2012
    • Kyung Hee University Medical Center
      • Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Adelaide
      • School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
      Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
    • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
      • Advanced Light Source Facility
      Berkeley, CA, United States
  • 2005–2012
    • Gyeongsang National University
      • Division of Applied Life Science
      Shinshū, South Gyeongsang, South Korea
    • Sogang University
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2004–2012
    • Sungkyunkwan University
      • • Department of Radiology
      • • Department of Surgery
      • • Centre of Advanced Materials Technology Research
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • University of Manitoba
      • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • 1997–2012
    • Hanyang University
      • • Department of Nuclear Engineering
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Major in Internal Medicine
      Ansan, Gyeonggi, South Korea
  • 1995–2012
    • Seoul National University
      • • Institute of Health and Environment
      • • Medical Research Center
      • • School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
      • • Department of Physics and Astronomy
      • • Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Seoul National University Hospital
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Neuropsychiatry
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Pohang University of Science and Technology
      • Pohang Accelerator Laboratory
      Geijitsu, Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea
  • 1991–2012
    • Kyung Hee University
      • • Department of Environmental Science and Environmental Engineering
      • • College of Medicine
      • • Electronics and Radio Engineering Division
      • • Department of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2010–2011
    • Ewha Womans University
      • Department of Food Science and Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2006–2011
    • Daewoo Engineering and Construction
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Chonnam National University Hospital
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2004–2011
    • Andong National University
      Antō, Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea
  • 2000–2011
    • Pusan National University
      • • Department of Nuclear Medicine
      • • Department of Internal Medicine
      • • Department of Microbiology
      • • Department of Dermatology
      Pusan, Busan, South Korea
    • Minneapolis Veterans Affairs Hospital
      Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States
    • Kunsan National University
      • Department of Physics
      Gunzan, North Jeolla, South Korea
  • 2009–2010
    • Inha University
      • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2005–2010
    • Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1997–2010
    • Chungbuk National University
      • • Department of Electronic Engineering
      • • College of Pharmacy
      Chinsen, North Chungcheong, South Korea
  • 1996–2010
    • Hallym University
      • College of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Kagoshima University
      Kagosima, Kagoshima, Japan
  • 2007–2009
    • National Cancer Institute (USA)
      • • Medical Oncology Branch and Affiliates
      • • Center for Cancer Research
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
    • Semyung University
      • Department of Electrical Engineering
      Seishō-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea
    • Korea Maritime Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1996–2009
    • Chonbuk National University
      • • Department of Chemical Engineering
      • • Semiconductor Physics Research Center
      Seoul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2008
    • National Fisheries Research and Development Institution
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • The Seoul Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • National Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences in Japan
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
    • Korea Food Research Institute
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2001–2008
    • Chosun University
      Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea
    • Korean Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2005–2007
    • University of Suwon
      • • Department of Physics
      • • Department of Chemical Engineering
      Suigen, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • 1997–2007
    • Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1995–2007
    • Soonchunhyang University
      • College of Medicine
      Onyang, South Chungcheong, South Korea
  • 1993–2007
    • Soon Chun Hyang University Hospital
      • Department of Gastroenterology
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2004–2006
    • Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology
      Daiden, Daejeon, South Korea
  • 2001–2006
    • Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology
      Usan-ri, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
    • Ajou University
      • • Department of Laboratory Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
    • Chonnam National University
      • • College of Veterinary Medicine
      • • Center for Ligand and Transcription
      Gwangju, Gwangju, South Korea
  • 1999–2004
    • Hanyang University Medical Center
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2003
    • University of California, Berkeley
      • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Berkeley, California, United States
  • 2000–2003
    • Hongik University
      • • Department of Science
      • • Department of Materials Science and Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1997–2003
    • Kookmin University
      • School of Advanced Materials Engineering
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1996–2003
    • University of Seoul
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 2002
    • Hyundai Heavy Industries
      Urusan, Ulsan, South Korea
  • 2001–2002
    • Korea Basic Science Institute KBSI
      Sŏul, Seoul, South Korea
  • 1987–2001
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Veterans Affairs Medical Center
      • • Division of Hospital Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Department of Anatomy
      San Francisco, CA, United States
  • 1998–2000
    • Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology KRIBB
      • • Genome Research Center
      • • Plant Cell and Molecular Biology Research Unit
      Anzan, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea
  • 1989–2000
    • San Francisco VA Medical Center
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 1997–1999
    • National Institutes of Health
      • Branch of Metabolic Diseases Branch (MDB)
      Bethesda, MD, United States
    • The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
      Maryland, United States
  • 1995–1999
    • International St. Mary's Hospitals
      Chemulpo, Incheon, South Korea
  • 1994–1995
    • Soroka Medical Center
      • Department of Gastroenterology
      Be'er Sheva`, Southern District, Israel
  • 1988
    • New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities
      • Department of Psychology
      New York City, New York, United States