W. Kundig

University of Zurich, Zürich, ZH, Switzerland

Are you W. Kundig?

Claim your profile

Publications (9)1.36 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We have measured Newton's gravitational constant with a commercially available mass comparator. In this experiment, the difference of the gravitational force of 13,600 kg mercury on two 1.1 kg copper masses was measured with a relative statistical uncertainty of 16.3times10-6. Including the systematic uncertainties we determine the gravitational constant G to be 6.674 252(122)times10-11 m3kg-1s-2.
    01/2008;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The goal of our experiment is a precision measurement of the gravitational constant G by means of a beam balance. The gravitational forces of two large and movable field masses act on test masses and change their weights. First measurements have been successfully completed with a relative uncertainty of 230 ppm. Since then various upgrades and improvements have been implemented.
    Precision Electromagnetic Measurements, 2002. Conference Digest 2002 Conference on; 02/2002
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We describe an experiment to measure the Newtonian gravitational constant G. The gravitational forces of large field masses on test masses are measured using a beam balance. A preliminary result with a relative uncertainty of 220×10<sup>-6</sup> has been published recently. In the meantime various modifications of the experiment have been made
    Precision Electromagnetic Measurements Digest, 2000 Conference on; 02/2000
  • F. Nolting, J. Schurr, W. Kundig
    Europhysics news 01/2000; 31(4):25-27.
  • F. Nolting, J. Schurr, W. Kundig
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We are carrying out a high-precision measurement of the gravitational constant G by means of a beam balance. Test measurements with water as field masses have been made and G has been determined with an uncertainty of 240×10<sup>-6</sup>. In the next step 13.5 tons of mercury will be used as field masses. The preparations for these measurements are briefly described in this paper
    IEEE Transactions on Instrumentation and Measurement 05/1999; · 1.36 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: 5.26> 7.1 Simulation of scattering The spectrometer was designed to minimize the probability that electrons scattered from baffles etc. can reach the detector. It could however not completely be avoided and caused a (small) distortion of the measured fi--spectra. Experimentally we have investigated scattering by accelerated photo-electrons with energies up to 50 keV. As the scattering distribution is a function of two variables, the initial energy of an electron and the energy with which it is detected, a complete measurement was not feasible. We have developed a Monte-Carlo program to simulate scattering. Figure 7.1 shows a comparison of the simulation with measured data. We find good agreement, but only if the most elaborate cross sections are used. The simulation gives us a good understanding of the scattering and we can use computed scattering distributions to correct the measured fi--spectra. 7.2 Results for 63 N
    05/1998;
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: this report. Presently, preparations are made for measurements with higher accuracy.
    05/1998;
  • W. Kundig, F. Nolting, J. Schurr
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: f 500 l. They will be filled first with water, later with mercury. The weight signal is expected to be about 53 50 g when the vessels are empty, 110 g with water and 780 g with mercury. We can thus make three different measurements of the gravitational force. The comparison of the results enables important consistency checks and should allow us to investigate possible sources of systematical uncertainties. The result with the best statistical uncertainty will of course be obtained with mercury. The balance has been made available by Mettler-Toledo and is one of the most precise balances in the world. It has been developed to compare 1-kg masses with high accuracy. The resolution of the balance is 100 ng and is further improved to 10 ng by averaging many weighings. A differential measurement with such a mass comparator is advantageous, since many disturbing forces and drift effects cancel in the weight difference. The balance can
    03/1998;
  • F. Nolting, J. Schurr, W. Kundig
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We are preparing a high precision measurement of the gravitational constant G, using a new technique. This technique is based on a flexure strip beam balance and an optimised mass arrangement. In this paper we describe the principle of this experiment
    Precision Electromagnetic Measurements Digest, 1996 Conference on; 07/1996