Lu Chen

Children's Oncology Group, Monrovia, California, United States

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Publications (6)59.72 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: In childhood Hodgkin lymphoma, estimated 5 years survival rates exceed 90%. Long-term survival continues to decline from delayed toxicities. Key findings from recent Children's Oncology Group trials include: (1) Radiotherapy selection may be based on early chemotherapy response assessed by both FDG-PET and CT imaging, (2) A new prognostic factor score stratifies patients into risk categories; and (3) novel retrieval regimens were identified. A phase I/II trial is investigating Brentuximab vedotin (Bv) with gemcitabine in relapsed patients. A phase 3 trial will modify conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches through the addition of Bv, while incorporating translational biology to identify molecular targets. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 12/2012; · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Treatment of pediatric lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (LPHL) is controversial but has typically consisted of both chemotherapy and radiation. Radiation therapy is associated with potential late effects in children and adolescents. We examined the impact of radiation therapy on long-term outcome of patients with LPHL treated on CCG-5942, a large pediatric cooperative group study of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Eighty-two patients with LPHL were registered on CCG-5942. Fifty-two patients (63%) received chemotherapy alone; 29 patients (35%) received chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT). The median follow-up of the LPHL patients is 7.7 years; 63 patients (77%) have >5 years of follow-up. The 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 97% and 100%. Two relapses occurred, both in patients who did not receive IFRT. There were no significant differences in EFS or OS between patients who received or did not receive IFRT. This subset analysis demonstrates the chemosensitivity of pediatric LPHL. Patients who had a complete response to chemotherapy had an excellent EFS and OS without the addition of radiotherapy. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2012; 59: 1284-1289. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Pediatric Blood & Cancer 07/2012; 59(7):1284-9. · 2.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE Children with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) routinely undergo surveillance computed tomography (CT) imaging for up to 5 years after therapy, resulting in cost and radiation exposure, without clear benefit. The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of surveillance CT, as compared with clinical findings, to detection of disease recurrence. PATIENTS AND METHODS Two hundred sixteen patients, age ≤ 21 years old, were treated on the multicenter Pediatric Oncology Group 9425 trial. Data for patients who experienced relapse were retrospectively reviewed to determine whether imaging or clinical events prompted suspicion of disease recurrence. Correlation was made to disease stage, time to recurrence, relapse site, and overall survival (OS). Results With a median follow-up time of 7.4 years, 25 (11.6%) of 216 patients had experienced a relapse, of whom 23 experienced local relapse. Median time to relapse was 7.6 months (range, 0.2 to 48.9 months). Nineteen relapses (76%) were detected based on symptoms, laboratory or physical examination findings, and two relapses (8%) were detected by imaging within the first year after therapy. Only four patients (16%) had their recurrence detected exclusively by surveillance imaging after the first year. Six deaths occurred, all in patients who experienced relapse within the first year after therapy. No patient with a recurrence after 1 year off treatment has died, regardless of how the recurrence was detected. CONCLUSION The majority of pediatric HL relapses occurred within the first year after therapy or were detected based on change in clinical status. Detecting late relapse, whether by imaging or clinical change, did not affect OS. These findings indicate that CT is overused for routine surveillance of patients with HL.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 06/2012; 30(21):2635-40. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE In 1995, the Children's Cancer Group (CCG) opened a trial for patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma evaluating whether low-dose involved-field radiation therapy (IFRT) improved event-free survival (EFS) for patients achieving a complete response after chemotherapy. We present the long-term study outcome using final data through March 2007. PATIENTS AND METHODS Between January 1995 and December 1998, 826 eligible patients were enrolled onto CCG 5942. Four hundred ninety-eight patients achieving an initial complete response to chemotherapy were randomly assigned to receive IFRT or no further therapy. EFS and overall survival (OS) were assessed from the date of study entry or random assignment, as appropriate. Results Ten-year EFS and OS rates for the entire cohort were 83.5% and 92.5%, respectively. In an as-treated analysis for randomly assigned patients, the 10-year EFS and OS rates were 91.2% and 97.1%, respectively, for IFRT and 82.9% and 95.9%, respectively, for no further therapy. For EFS and OS comparisons, P = .004 and P = .50, respectively. Bulk disease, "B" symptoms, and nodular sclerosis histology were risk factors for inferior EFS. CONCLUSION With a median follow-up of 7.7 years, IFRT produced a statistically significant improvement in EFS but no improvement in OS. For individual patients, the relative risks of relapse versus late effects of IFRT must be considered. Patient and disease characteristics and early response assessment will aid in deciding which patients are most likely to benefit from IFRT.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 05/2012; 30(26):3174-80. · 18.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The International Harmonization Project defined complete response (CR) after treatment for Hodgkin disease (HD) by absence of fluorodeoxyglucose avidity, regardless of the size of residual masses. Residual avidity after initial treatment is known to predict inferior survival. In the setting of retrieval therapy, early positron emission tomography (PET) scans may improve assessment of treatment efficacy. Retrospective analysis after 2 cycles of gemcitabine and vinorelbine for refractory HD revealed 6 CR among 13 patients by PET and 1 CR in 13 by computed tomography (CT). No relationship between PET response and event-free or overall survival could be discerned, presumably because of the heterogeneity of subsequent therapies.
    Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 11/2010; 27(8):650-7. · 0.90 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The Children's Oncology Group conducted this phase II study to assess the efficacy and toxicity of gemcitabine and vinorelbine (GV) in pediatric patients with heavily pretreated relapsed/refractory Hodgkin's disease. Both agents have significant single-agent response rates in this setting. GV was given on days 1 and 8 of each 21-day treatment cycle: vinorelbine 25 mg/m(2)/dose administered via intravenous (IV) push before gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2)/dose IV over 100 minutes. Any patients who demonstrated a measurable response (complete response [CR], very good partial response [VGPR], or partial response [PR]) were considered to have experienced a response to GV. Response was evaluated after every two cycles. A two-stage minimax rule was used to test the null hypothesis that the response rate is <or= 40% against an alternative hypothesis of a response rate more than 65%. Thirty eligible patients with a median age of 17.7 years (range, 10.7 to 29.4 years) were enrolled. All patients had received at least two prior chemotherapy regimens, and 17 patients had undergone prior autologous stem-cell transplantation. Hematologic toxicity was predominant in all treatment cycles. Nonhematologic grade 3 to 4 toxicity, including elevated hepatic enzymes and hyperbilirubinemia, was less common. Pericardial and pleural effusions developed in one patient after cycles 4 and 5 of GV, consistent with gemcitabine-induced radiation recall. There were no toxic deaths. Measurable responses were seen in 19 (76%) of 25 assessable patients (95% exact binomial CI, 55% to 91%), including six CRs, 11 VGPRs, and two PRs. GV is an effective and well-tolerated reinduction regimen for children with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's disease.
    Journal of Clinical Oncology 02/2009; 27(9):1456-61. · 18.04 Impact Factor