Ali Akbar Haghdoost

Kerman Neuroscience Research Center, Carmana, Kermān, Iran

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Publications (122)167.22 Total impact

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    Mohammad Karamouzian, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Hamid Sharifi
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the fact that HIV epidemic is mainly driven by injection drug use in Iran, partners of People Who Inject Drugs (PWID) have been seriously neglected in terms of effective preventive interventions. Currently, sexual partners of PWID might have access to some harm reduction services at Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT) centers; however, their needs have not been effectively targeted and met. Unfortunately, the current programs implemented by the Ministry of Health have overlooked the importance of this population in the course of the HIV epidemic throughout the country. In this policy brief, we are trying to draw the health policy-makers' attention to this overlooked population and while reviewing the advantages and disadvantages of some of the readily available options on the table, come up with a recommended action to tackle this problem. Our recommended action that seems to have had promising results elsewhere in Asia would try to implement preventive interventions targeting this particular population through peer prevention programs.
    International Journal of Health Policy and Management (IJHPM) 02/2014; 2(2):81-3.
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    ABSTRACT: Background & Objective: Ph.D by research is one of the highest post-graduate education degrees in Iran. There are educational and research-based courses in this program. There was a need for revision in these courses because of some controversies in running the program. This study aimed to determine the required courses, their credit and objective of each course in the program. Methods: The study was done by the Delphi approach in two rounds. In the first round, the current program was evaluated by an internet survey and an expert panel. The expert panel consisted of professors and PhD by research students of medical sciences universities in Iran. At the end of the first round, the curriculum of the program was prepared. The curriculum consisted of course titles, credits, objective and core or non-core curriculums. In the second round, the curriculum was sent to PhD by research supervisors and students and their feedbacks were collected via e-mail. Results: At the end of the study, the list of current courses (per credit) was confirmed. Advanced statistics (3), advanced research (2), ethics in research (1) and documentation (2) were considered as core courses. This was suggested to change project management (2) and research projects (4) to non-core courses. The electronic data management (2), knowledge transfer (2), laboratory techniques (2) and course thesis were suggested to consider as non-core courses. Conclusion: The essential courses that students need for their research were considered as core and the courses which require the educational center point of view were considered as non-core courses.
    Journal of strides in development of medical education. 10/2013; 10(3):240-250.
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    Abbas Alipour, Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Leily Sajadi, Farzaneh Zolala
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    ABSTRACT: Sexual partners of injecting drug users (IDUs) are at high risk of HIV infection, yet data for such populations are scarce worldwide, particularly in the Middle East and North African region. This study measured and compared the prevalence of HIV, hepatitis C (HCV), hepatitis B (HBV) and related behavioural factors in male IDUs (MIDUs), their main female sexual partners who were also injecting drug users (FIDUPs) and their main non-injecting female partners (FNIDUPs). Using convenience sampling, MIDUs were recruited at drop-in health centres in three cities (Tehran, Mashhad and Shiraz), who in turn recruited their main female partners. Behavioural data were collected using a standard questionnaire, and blood samples were drawn for HIV and HCV antibody testing and HBV surface antigen. HIV prevalence was 9.4% (95% CI 2.96% to 26.2%) among MIDUs (n=226), 7.7% (95% CI 1.9% to 26.3%) among FIDUPs (n=42) and 2.8% (95% CI 0.65% to 11.3%) among FNIDUPs (n=184). HCV prevalence was 38.6% (95% CI 20.3% to 60.7%) among MIDUs, 36.6% (95% CI 13.6% to 67.9%) among FIDUPs and 8.4% (95% CI 5.67% to 12.4%) among FNIDUPs. HBV surface antigen prevalence was 3.6% (95% CI 1.5% to 8.3%), 7.3% (95% CI 1.9% to 24.8%) and 1.1% (95% CI 0.3% to 4.7%), respectively. Among MIDUs, 19.5% (95% CI 3.4% to 62.2%) had a history of sexual contact with other men. Mean age at first sexual contact in MIDUs was 19.2 years (95% CI 18.6 to 25.2) and in FIDUPs and FNIDUPs 16.4 years (95% CI 14.1 to 22.1) and 18.2 years (95% CI 15.7 to 23.1), respectively. FIDUPs and FNIDUPs had a higher mean number of sexual partners (other than their main partner) in the previous month than MIDUs (5.5 (95% CI 0 to 14.1) and 2.5 (95% CI 1.1 to 4) vs 1.3 (95% CI 0.37 to 2.2), respectively). FIDUPs tended to use drugs before or during sex with their main and casual partners more often than MIDUs (with main partner: 69% (95% CI 41.5% to 87.5%) vs 54.4% (95% CI 27% to 79.4%), respectively, and with casual partners: 47.6% (95% CI 13.1% to 84.6%) vs 34.1% (95% CI 10% to 70.6%), respectively); however, the differences were not statistically significant. Female partners of MIDUs in Iran and elsewhere are an under studied group. The high rate of HIV, HCV and HBV infection among females who are partners of MIDUs points to the necessity of appropriate injection and sexual risk reduction interventions among this group, to prevent acquisition of HIV, HCV and HBV and their onward transmission to other male partners.
    Sexually transmitted infections 09/2013; · 2.18 Impact Factor
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  • Ali Akbar Haghdoost, Mahmood Moosazadeh
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    ABSTRACT: Studentship period is a time when most behavioral traits are being created and fixed; this is a special time when students may start smoking. Thus in the present research, prevalence of smoking in university students in Iran has been evaluated. Having extensively explored Iranian and International databases (SID, Iranmedex, Magiran, Medlib, Irandoc, Pubmed, Google Scholar, and WHO) with broad keywords, we looked for relevant papers about the frequency of cigarette smoking among students in Iranian universities in recent years. We recruited only those primary papers with required information and acceptable methodology by reviewing their titles, abstracts, and full-texts. The main data about the prevalence of smoking, age and sex distribution of subjects, sample size, date, and location of studies were extracted from the full-text of eligible papers. A total of 22 valid articles were selected. Among the findings of these studies, the lowest and highest prevalence of smoking among male students was 13.4 and 39.9, respectively, while it was 0.7 and 25.5%, respectively, among female students. Meta-analysis results reveals that smoking frequency among male and female students in Iran's universities is 19.8% (17.7-21.9) and 2.2% (1.4-3.02), respectively. The variation of smoking in students in different universities shows that the tendency of smoking varies in different locations. Furthermore, compatible with the prevalence of smoking in the general population in Iran, female students smoke much less than male students.
    Journal of research in medical sciences 08/2013; 18(8):717-725. · 0.68 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Men who have sex with men (MSM) are at growing risk of HIV infection in many parts of the world; however, the epidemic has not been well explored among this population in most Arab countries. To estimate the prevalence of HIV and related risk behaviors among MSM in Yemen, we recruited 261 adult MSM from the port cities of Aden and Al-Hudaydah through venue- and facility-based sampling. Behavioral data were collected with a face-to-face questionnaire, and HIV status was determined by serological testing. HIV prevalence was 5.9 % (95 % CI 4.8-7.3). One-fourth (25.8 %, 95 % CI 20.7-31.5) had tested for HIV in the last year and received results; 27.8 % (95 % CI 22.5-33.7) had comprehensive knowledge about HIV; 20.0 % (95 % CI 15.8-25.0) reported condom use at last anal sex; and 31.4 % (95 % CI 25.9-37.3) reported that they or their sexual partner had a sexually transmitted disease symptom. Injecting drugs in the last year was reported by 0.8 % (95 % CI 0.1-9.2). Multiple risk behaviors, low HIV knowledge, few preventive behaviors, and HIV prevalence greater than 5 % denote a concentrated and potentially expanding HIV epidemic among MSM in Yemen. No time should be lost in intervening to prevent further expansion of the epidemic to levels already seen among MSM outside the Middle East.
    AIDS and Behavior 07/2013; · 3.49 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We present probabilistic and Bayesian techniques to correct for bias in categorical and numerical measures and empirically apply them to a recent survey of female sex workers (FSW) conducted in Iran. We used bias parameters from a previous validation study to correct estimates of behaviours reported by FSW. Monte-Carlo Sensitivity Analysis and Bayesian bias analysis produced point and simulation intervals (SI). The apparent and corrected prevalence differed by a minimum of 1% for the number of 'non-condom use sexual acts' (36.8% vs 35.8%) to a maximum of 33% for 'ever associated with a venue to sell sex' (35.5% vs 68.0%). The negative predictive value of the questionnaire for 'history of STI' and 'ever associated with a venue to sell sex' was 36.3% (95% SI 4.2% to 69.1%) and 46.9% (95% SI 6.3% to 79.1%), respectively. Bias-adjusted numerical measures of behaviours increased by 0.1 year for 'age at first sex act for money' to 1.5 for 'number of sexual contacts in last 7 days'. The 'true' estimates of most behaviours are considerably higher than those reported and the related SIs are wider than conventional CIs. Our analysis indicates the need for and applicability of bias analysis in surveys, particularly in stigmatised settings.
    Journal of epidemiology and community health 06/2013; · 3.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To get more precise responses when gathering information about sensitive topics such as drug use, it is important to use the most optimal method. This study was carried out to address the impact of three interview methods (street-based, household, and telephone interviews) on response pattern to sensitive and non-sensitive questions in terms of participation, disclosure and discontinuing rates. We selected three culturally diverse major cities of Iran. Then, we randomly selected 300 subjects, 100 for each type of interview, from each major city (899 in total). For street-based interviews only pedestrians who were walking alone were recruited, for household interviews only one individual from each house participated (3-4 houses in each alley were selected), and for telephone interviews we selected phone numbers using a random number list. We asked five non-sensitive and five sensitive (related to drug use and sexual contact among their personal network) questions. For telephone and household interviews, relative to street-based interviews, participants were less likely to disclose alcohol and drug-related behaviors (Adjusted OR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.60- 0.97) and sexual behaviors among their network (Adjusted OR telephone/street-based = 0.64; 95% CI: 0.39- 1.07 and Adjusted OR household/ street-based = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.33- 0.95). We found that participants who were interviewed via the telephone were more likely (Adjusted OR = 1.24) and those who were interviewed at home were less likely (Adjusted OR = 0.86) to report non-sensitive information compared to participants who were interviewed on the street; however, these findings were not statistically significant. The largest participation rate and the least discontinuation rate were observed for household interviews. It seems that the methods of interview effect response to both sensitive and non-sensitive questions. We believe that for street-based interviews, respondents may disclose more sensitive information than telephone and household interviews.
    Iranian Red Crescent medical journal. 06/2013; 15(6):500-506.
  • International journal of infectious diseases: IJID: official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases 04/2013; · 2.17 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Objectives: Improving the drug usage pattern and moving through a community with appropriate, safe, with doses that meet individual requirements and for an adequate period of time is pivotal and recommended by World Health Organization. In this study, we investigate the drug prescription patterns in the Kerman province in Iran. Materials and Methods: Prescription indices in Kerman prescription database of Food and Drug deputy in 2008, which includes prescription of 245 general practitioners and 455 physicians, were extracted. Selected WHO drug use indicators including number of prescribed medicines and their cost, maximum number of prescribed medicine, number of prescribed antibiotics, injection and corticosteroids were investigated in this cross-sectional study design. Results: Average number of medicines prescribed per patient was 3.15±0.49 and 2.85±0.61 for general practitioners and physicians, respectively (p=0.001). Mean for maximum number of prescribed medicines were 6.67±1.20 and 6.57±1.67 for general practitioners and physicians, respectively. For general practitioners, 16.8% of prescriptions encountered with an injection, 17.7% encountered with a corticosteroid prescription and 51.9% encountered with an antibiotic. For physicians, 12.8% of prescriptions encountered with an injection, 15.4% with a corticosteroid prescription and 39.0% encountered with an antibiotic. The difference in prescribing these categories was significant between practitioners and physicians (p=0.001, p=0.001 and p=0.016, respectively). Experienced practitioners were more cautious in the number of prescribed medicines (p=0.001), however, the price of their prescriptions were higher than the young practitioners (p=0.001). Conclusion: Despite the educational programs for the rational use of drugs, prescribing indicators are far from international recommended criteria. Hence, it is necessary to promote prescribing practices through establishing more comprehensive training courses related to the rational use of medicines. Besides, exerting surveillance systems is a useful way to monitor and control drug usage in the community.
    Journal of Rafsenjan University of Medical Sciences. 02/2013; 11(6):523-536.
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    ABSTRACT: There are numerous studies and documents regarding the prevalence of smoking in Iran. Thus, to provide suitable information for decision-making and policy-making in this regard, the prevalence of smoking in Iran was evaluated using the meta-analysis of the results of the existing researches. Data were collected by searching the keywords cigarette, smoking, tobacco, and nicotine in English databases, searching their Persian equivalents in Persian Databases, and in non-electronic resources. After studying the titles and texts of collected articles, the repeated and irrelevant cases were excluded. Cases which had the inclusion criteria of this meta-analysis were entered into the Stata software. According to heterogeneity results, random effect model was used to estimate the prevalence of smoking. In initial studies and non-communicable surveillance system, 274992 Iranian adults were studied regarding daily smoking. Among initial studies, smoking prevalence varied from 12.3% to 38.5% in men, and from 0.6% to 9.8% in women. Based on the meta-analysis of initial studies and risk factors of non-communicable disease surveillance system, smoking prevalence was estimated 21.7% and 19.8% in men and 3.6% and 0.94% in women, respectively. Moreover, smoking prevalence in all subjects was estimated 13.9% according to the meta-analysis of the initial study. The findings of this meta-analysis revealed that a significant part of the general population over 15 years of age, and one fifth of Iranian male adults smoke. Thus, concerning causal relationship confirmed between smoking and most diseases, if suitable guidelines are not employed the diseases related to this factor will increase in Iran.
    Addiction & health. 01/2013; 5(3-4):140-53.
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Coronary artery disease is known as the main reasons of the mortality. According to the study and evaluating symptoms based on the risk factors, it is critical to prevent the waste of time during the triage. The present study was done for the purpose of investigating the relationship between risk factors and the segment ST changes with the symptoms of acute coronary syndrome. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 294 patients in Amol (Iran) hospital CCU ward, with the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome who had survived at least 24 hours after the admission were investigated. Data were gathered and analyzed by the use of the questionnaire which included the demographic information form, symptom check list and some risk factors. Results: There was a significant difference between the ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) with vomiting (OR= 1.94) and anxiety (OR = 1.82) and UA with vomiting (OR = 0.42). There also was a significant relationship between the gender with the weakness ( OR = 2.29 ) and anxiety ( (OR = 1.82 ), diabetes with dyspnea ( OR = 1.8 ) , weakness ( OR = 1.02 ) and tinnitus ( OR = 2.49 ). Conclusion: There are many various types of heart attack and the precise knowledge of these varieties in different subgroups of the patients and also different types of heart attack will certainly help the specialists and doctors. The results of this study might be able to clarify some part of this complicating connections and it can also give contribution to the specialists in order to make good recognition in addition of making some questions for the researches who are looking for the cause of such different symptoms in the patients.
    Koomesh 01/2013; 15(1):46-53.
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Obesity is currently emerging as a global epidemic, affecting 10% of adult population worldwide. The primary objective of the current systematic review is to describe the trend of overall prevalence of obesity in Iranian women and menthrough a meta-analysis. METHODS We searched the medical literature published from 1990 to 2007 in Medline (PubMed), EMBASE database, and the Iranian digital library. All published reports of research projects, papers in relevant congresses, unpublished crude data analysis, proceedings, books and dissertations were reviewed. Data from eligible papers that fulfilled the qualification criteria entered meta-analysis (Random Model). RESULTS Data from 209,166 individuals were analyzed. The overall prevalence of obesity in adults was 18.5% (95%CI: 15.1-21.8), respectively. The prevalence of obesity in men and women was 12.9% (95%CI: 10.9-14.9) and 26.2% (95%CI: 21.3-30.5), respectively. The trend of obesity was similar in both genders; women had almost a constantly higher risk of obesity than men during the recent two decades. CONCLUSION Data from 209,166 individuals were analyzed. The overall prevalence of obesity in adults was 18.5% (95%CI: 15.1-21.8), respectively. The prevalence of obesity in men and women was 12.9% (95%CI: 10.9-14.9) and 26.2% (95%CI: 21.3-30.5), respectively. The trend of obesity was similar in both genders; women had almost a constantly higher risk of obesity than men during the recent two decades. KEYWORDS Obesity; Systematic Review; Meta-analysis; Iran
    Middle East J Dig Dis. 01/2013;
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. This study aimed to determine the association between some oral health status as a risk factor for cardiac diseases and other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a sample of Iranian population in 2011. Methods. The study recruited 5900 inhabitants who aged 15-75 years old of Kerman city through a population based cluster sampling. Having collected informed consent, participants were interviewed for CVD risk factors. Some oral health indicators such as DMFT, Gingival Inflammation index, and Community Periodontal Index were assessed. The association between oral health indices and CVD risk factors was tested using multivariate regression models. Results. The mean age of participants was 33.5 years, and 45.1% were male. Moderate gingival inflammation was observed in 67.6% of participants. Presence of sub- or supragingival calculus was more common (90%) in participants. Older age (RR from 2.7 to 3.88), cigarette smoking (RR = 1.49), and high blood glucose (RR = 1.41) showed an increased risk for oral diseases after adjustment for different covariates including established CVD risk factors. Conclusion. The study results showed an increase in periodontal diseases in the presence of some CVD risk factors. Therefore there may be a bilateral but independent association for both conditions and common risk factor approach preventive program is highly recommended.
    ISRN cardiology. 01/2013; 2013:782126.
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    Journal of Environmental and Public Health 01/2013; 2013:209739.
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    ABSTRACT: As the result of epidemiological transition and aging of Iranian population, the frequencies of systemic diseases among patients in of need endodontic treatment has increased, especially within developed cities. However, there have been no concise reports of systemic diseases in Iranian patients. Based on this need, the present investigation was conducted to assess the frequency of systemic disease among patients referred to endodontic private practice in three main cities in Iran. In a retrospective study, the frequency of systematic diseases were abstracted from the health records of patients who were referred to three private practices limited to endodontics in Kerman, Mashhad, and Tehran between 1994 to 2011. Overall, 15,413 records of patients were assessed. The patterns of systematic diseases among endodontic patients in these three cities were different. The overall frequency of systemic disease in Kerman was significantly higher than two other cities (Kerman: 55.03%, Mashhad: 24.32%, Tehran: 22.16%; P<0.001). The most commonly occurring diseases were cardiac disease, hypertension, allergy and neurological disorders. Since the number of endodontic patients with systematic diseases is considerably significant and varied, special training and educations for treatment of medically compromised patient should be considered at both post- and undergraduate training.
    Iranian endodontic journal. 01/2013; 8(2):48-51.
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    01/2013; 15(1):46-53.
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    ABSTRACT: In the case of sensitive questions such as number of alcoholics known, majority of respondents might give an answer of zero. Poisson regression model (P) is the standard tool to analyze count data. However, P provides poor fit in the case of zero inflated counts, when over-dispersion exists. Therefore, the questions to be addressed are to compare performance of alternative count regression models; and to investigate whether characteristics of respondents affect their responses. A total of 700 participants were asked about number of people they know in hidden groups; alcoholics, methadone users, and Female Sex Workers (FSW). Five regression models were fitted to these outcomes: Logistic, P, Negative Binomial (NB), Zero Inflated Poisson (ZIP), and Zero Inflated Negative Binomial (ZINB). Models were compared in terms of Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT), Vuong, AIC and Sum Square of Error (SSE). Percentages of zero were 35% for number of alcoholics, 50% for methadone users, and 65% for FSWs. ZINB provided the best fit for alcoholics, and NB provided the best fit for other outcomes. In addition, we noticed that young respondents, male and those with low education were more likely to know or reveal sensitive information. Although P is the first choice for modeling of count data in many cases, it seems because of over-dispersion of zero inflated counts in the case of sensitive questions, other models, specifying NB and ZINB, might have better goodness of fit.
    Journal of research in health sciences. 01/2013; 13(2):143-150.

Publication Stats

269 Citations
167.22 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Kerman Neuroscience Research Center
      Carmana, Kermān, Iran
    • Zahedan University of Medical Sciences
      Dowzdāb, Sīstān va Balūchestān, Iran
    • Regional Knowledge Hub for HIV/AIDS Surveillance
      Carmana, Kermān, Iran
  • 2011–2012
    • Tehran University of Medical Sciences
      • Department of Medical Entomology and Vector Control Campaign
      Tehrān, Ostan-e Tehran, Iran
  • 2006–2012
    • Kerman University of Medical Sciences
      • Center of Neuroscience Research
      Carmana, Kermān, Iran
  • 2010
    • Shiraz University of Medical Sciences
      • Health Policy Research Center
      Shīrāz, Fars, Iran
  • 2009
    • Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences
      • Department of Public Health
      Tehrān, Ostan-e Tehran, Iran
    • Hamadan University of Medical Sciences
      • Department of Endodontics
      Hamadān, Ostan-e Hamadan, Iran