James R Bentham

Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (7)15.57 Total impact

  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To describe early clinical experience with the amplatzer ductal occluder II additional sizes (ADO II AS) for percutaneous arterial duct occlusion in infants and small children. Pre-, intra- and postprocedural data analysis of all patients undergoing arterial duct occlusion with the ADO II AS from three tertiary referral centers. 17 patients (10 female) with a median age of 6 months (range 1.0-48.1 months) and a median weight of 5.7 kg (range 1.7-17.4 kg) underwent attempted transcatheter ductal closure with the ADO II AS. Retrograde arterial approach was used in eight patients with transvenous femoral approach used in nine. The mean minimal ductal diameter was 2.2 ± 0.7 mm with mean ductal length of 6.8 ± 1.7 mm. Device sizes used were 5/6 (n = 5), 3/4 (n = 4), 4/4 (n = 3), 4/6 (n = 3), and 5/4 (n = 2) with four French delivery sheaths used in all cases. The median fluoroscopy time was 5.7 ± 1.8 min. Two patients underwent delivery under exclusive echocardiography guidance. Complete ductal occlusion was achieved by the end of the procedure in 13 patients. Device embolization to the left pulmonary artery occurred in one patient with successful surgical removal and ligation of the arterial duct. Three patients required device resizing following deployment of the initial device. Complete ductal occlusion without aortic arch or left pulmonary artery stenosis has been identified in all 16 remaining patients on transthoracic echocardiographic follow-up at median of 4.2 months. The new amplatzer ductal occluder II AS achieves excellent ductal closure rates through low profile delivery systems in small infants and children with variable ductal anatomy. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 147.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 06/2013; · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical impact of management of coarctation of the aorta by transcatheter stent placement in the context of longer term management of systemic hypertension. In the long term, poor outlook associated with untreated coarctation of the aorta is likely to relate to uncontrolled systemic hypertension. Transcatheter stent placement to treat native and recurrent coarctation of the aorta is an established therapy in adolescents and adults. There remains confusion about longer term outcomes, particularly the relation between procedural success and improvement in blood pressure (BP) control. Improvement in lifelong systemic BP control after transcatheter stent placement remains unproved. Forty patients underwent transcatheter stent placement over a 10-year period (2001 to 2010) at the Yorkshire Heart Centre. The average age at the time of procedure was 25 years (range 14 to 57). There was a reduction in peak systolic gradient across the coarcted segment from 25 to <10 mm Hg in 35 of 39 patients. After stent placement, there was a significant improvement in systolic BP control at early and later follow-up (mean 155 mm Hg before the procedure and 134 mm Hg at 2.81-year follow-up, p <0.0001). There was 1 early procedural adverse event (stent embolization) and 1 late adverse event (lower limb claudication). In conclusion, transcatheter stent placement for the management of aortic coarctation is associated with a reduction in systolic BP that is maintained over the medium term. A significant minority of patients remain significantly hypertensive, and the best management strategy for this group of patients remains unclear.
    The American journal of cardiology 12/2012; · 3.58 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to describe the clinical importance and methods of transcatheter closure of systemic venous baffle leaks after atrial redirection procedures for transposed great vessels. Until the late 1970s, atrial redirection surgery was the principal surgical palliative approach to manage transposed great vessels. Baffle leaks are among the many long-term complications of this type of surgery, and their prevalence increases over time. The clinical consequences of baffle leaks in this population are poorly understood, and the indications for closure are incompletely defined. During outpatient follow-up of 126 patients after atrial redirection surgery, 15 baffle leaks were detected in 11 patients. All underwent transcatheter closure using either an occluding device or a covered stent if there was concomitant baffle obstruction. The average age at the time of the procedure was 26 years (range 6 to 42). Ten of 11 patients were cyanosed at rest or on a simple walk test (median oxygen saturation level 80%, range 65% to 96%). Six of 11 patients were polycythemic before leak closure (median hemoglobin concentration 19 g/dl, range 13.8 to 23). After closure, there was a significant improvement in saturation (median 97%, p <0.0001) and a significant reduction in hemoglobin concentration at 6 months after the procedure (median 14.8 g/dl, p <0.05). There were no procedural adverse events. One patient experienced late device embolization necessitating surgical removal. In conclusion, transcatheter closure of baffle leaks is a technically feasible although frequently complex and lengthy procedure. Closure is associated with an improvement in oxygen saturations and a reduction in polycythaemia.
    The American journal of cardiology 06/2012; 110(7):1046-50. · 3.58 Impact Factor
  • [show abstract] [hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe early clinical experience with the Amplatzer Ductal Occluder II Additional Sizes (ADO II AS) for percutaneous arterial duct occlusion in infants and small children. METHODS: Pre-, intra- and post-procedural data analysis of all patients undergoing arterial duct occlusion with the ADO II AS from three tertiary referral centers. RESULTS: 17 patients (10 female) with a median age of 6 months (range1.0-48.1 months) and a median weight of 5.7 kgs (range 1.7-17.4 kgs) underwent attempted transcatheter ductal closure with the ADO II AS. Retrograde arterial approach was used in 8 patients with transvenous femoral approach used in 9. The mean minimal ductal diameter was 2.2±0.7 mm with mean ductal length of 6.8±1.7 mm. Device sizes used were 5/6 (n=5), 3/4 (n=4), 4/4 (n=3), 4/6 (n=3), and 5/4 (n=2) with 4 French delivery sheaths used in all cases. The median fluoroscopy time was 5.7±1.8 minutes. Two patients underwent delivery under exclusive echocardiography guidance. Complete ductal occlusion was achieved by the end of the procedure in 13 patients. Device embolization to the left pulmonary artery occurred in one patient with successful surgical removal and ligation of the arterial duct. Three patients required device resizing following deployment of the initial device. Complete ductal occlusion without aortic arch or left pulmonary artery stenosis has been identified in all 16 remaining patients on transthoracic echocardiographic follow-up at median of 4.2 months. CONCLUSIONS: The new Amplatzer Ductal Occluder II AS achieves excellent ductal closure rates through low profile delivery systems in small infants and children with variable ductal anatomy. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 06/2012; · 2.51 Impact Factor
  • James R Bentham, John D R Thomson, John L Gibbs
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    ABSTRACT: Objective:  To describe the technical aspects and outcome of duct occlusion in adults over a 12-year period. Methods:  A single center review of all transcatheter duct closures performed between 2000 and 2012. Results:  Of 518 transcatheter duct closures performed, 31 patients were over the age of 16 at the time of procedure (6%). In 10 of the 31 cases, it was not possible to cross the duct from the pulmonary artery. In 4 of those, the duct was small enough to be closed with coils delivered from the aorta (although 1 required a second procedure for a residual shunt). In the remaining 6 cases, it was necessary to cross the duct from the aorta and create an arterio-venous "circuit" using a snare to deliver an Amplatzer device from the femoral vein. In none of the 487 children who underwent transcatheter duct closure during the same time period was it necessary to deliver the device using an arterio-venous wire circuit. The increased complexity of the procedure in adults compared with children was further reflected by longer procedure times (median of 37 minutes in adults vs. 24 minutes in children [P < 0.01]) and longer fluoroscopy times (median of 8.4 minutes in adults vs. 4.3 minutes in children [P < 0.025]). There were no major complications. Conclusions:  Closure of the arterial duct in adults is safe and effective but ductal anatomy may differ from that seen in childhood, making transcatheter closure technically much more demanding than in children. (J Interven Cardiol 2012;25:501-504).
    Journal of Interventional Cardiology 06/2012; 25(5):501-4. · 1.50 Impact Factor
  • James R Bentham, Nilesh Oswal, Robert Yates
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    ABSTRACT: To describe endovascular stent placement using partially covered stents to preserve flow in head and neck vessels. Endovascular stent placement has become established as a first-line therapy for native coarctation of the aorta or re-coarctation in older children and adults. Increasingly covered stents are becoming the preferred option over bare-metal stents because of the perceived lower risk of aneurysm formation. Open-cell bare-metal stents are chosen when there is a high likelihood of jailing a head and neck vessel. Here we describe partial uncovering of a covered stent before implantation to allow flow through the uncovered portion of the stent to the branch vessel but preserve the covering over the majority of the remaining stent. We describe two cases with aortic arch hypoplasia and re-coarctation, both of which required two partially uncovered stents for a satisfactory result. Endovascular stent placement is becoming the preferred option in the management of coarctation of the aorta in older children and adults. Strategies to deal with transverse arch hypoplasia and multiple levels of aortic arch obstruction frequently involving branch vessels or aneurysms need to be considered before these procedures are embarked upon. Partially uncovering stents may afford more protection than using bare-metal stents in the transverse and distal arch while preserving flow in head and neck branches, and is a technically straightforward procedure.
    Cardiology in the Young 03/2012; 22(5):610-4. · 0.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To describe the difficulties and differing techniques in the transcatheter placement of amplatz ventricular septal defect devices to close perimembranous ventricular septal defects and place these in the context of the expanding literature on ventricular septal defect catheter closure. Surgery remains the established first-line therapy for closure of haemodynamically significant perimembranous ventricular septal defects. Transcatheter techniques appeared to promise a possible alternative, obviating the need for cardiac surgery. However, significant technical and anatomical constraints coupled with ongoing reports of a high incidence of heart block have prevented these hopes from being realised to any significant extent. It is likely that there are important methodological reasons for the high complication rates observed. The potential advantages of transcatheter perimembranous ventricular septal defect closure over surgery warrant further exploration of differing transcatheter techniques. Between August, 2004 and November, 2009, 21 patients had a perimembranous ventricular septal defect closed with transcatheter techniques. Of these, 14 were closed with a muscular amplatz ventricular septal defect device. The median age and weight at device placement were 8 years, ranging from 2 to 19 years, and 18.6 kilograms, ranging from 10 to 21 kilograms, respectively. There were 25 procedures performed on 23 patients using 21 amplatz ventricular septal defect devices. Median defect size on angiography was 7.8 millimetres, ranging from 4 to 14.3 millimetres, with a median device size of 8 millimetres, ranging from 4 to 18 millimetres, and a defect/device ratio of 1.1, with a range from 0.85 to 1.33. Median procedure time was 100 minutes, with a range from 38 to 235 minutes. Adverse events included device embolisation following haemolysis in one, and new aortic incompetence in another, but there were no cases of heart block. Median follow-up was 41.7 months, with a range from 2 to 71 months. Evaluating transcatheter closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defect using amplatz ventricular septal defect devices remains important, if a technically feasible method with low and acceptable complication rates is to be identified. Incidence of heart block may be minimised by avoiding oversized devices, using muscular devices, and accepting defeat if an appropriately selected device pulls through. Given the current transcatheter technologies, the closure of perimembranous ventricular septal defects should generally be performed in children when they weigh at least 10 kilograms.
    Cardiology in the Young 02/2011; 21(3):271-80. · 0.95 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

4 Citations
15.57 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2012
    • Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Foundation Trust
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • The Heart Lung Center
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011
    • Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust
      • Department of Paediatric Cardiology
      Oxford, England, United Kingdom