Matthew J. Sorrentino

University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States

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Publications (15)15.67 Total impact

  • Isac C Thomas, Matthew J Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Novel, nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (OACs) have demonstrated similar or superior efficacy to warfarin for ischemic stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). As the prevalence of AF rises in a growing elderly population, these agents are becoming central to the routine practice of clinicians caring for these patients. Though the benefits are clear, the decision to treat the elderly patient with AF with long-term oral OACs is often a dilemma for the clinician mindful of the risk of major bleeding. Several bleeding risk prediction models have been created to help the clinician identify patients for whom the risk of bleeding is high, and would potentially outweigh the benefits of OAC therapy. In this review, we discuss the features of 8 bleeding risk prediction models, including the recently described HEMORR2HAGES, HAS-BLED, and ATRIA models, and approaches to assessing bleeding risk in clinical practice.
    Current Cardiology Reports 01/2014; 16(1):432.
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    The Journal of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery 07/2012; 144(1):39-71. · 3.41 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The American College of Cardiology Foundation, in collaboration with the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions and key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted a review of common clinical scenarios where diagnostic catheterization is frequently considered. The indications (clinical scenarios) were derived from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines and results of studies examining the implementation of noninvasive imaging appropriate use criteria. The 166 indications in this document were developed by a diverse writing group and scored by a separate independent technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9, to designate appropriate use (median 7 to 9), uncertain use (median 4 to 6), and inappropriate use (median 1 to 3). Diagnostic catheterization may include several different procedure components. The indications developed focused primarily on 2 aspects of diagnostic catheterization. Many indications focused on the performance of coronary angiography for the detection of coronary artery disease with other procedure components (e.g., hemodynamic measurements, ventriculography) at the discretion of the operator. The majority of the remaining indications focused on hemodynamic measurements to evaluate valvular heart disease, pulmonary hypertension, cardiomyopathy, and other conditions, with the use of coronary angiography at the discretion of the operator. Seventy-five indications were rated as appropriate, 49 were rated as uncertain, and 42 were rated as inappropriate. The appropriate use criteria for diagnostic catheterization have the potential to impact physician decision making, healthcare delivery, and reimbursement policy. Furthermore, recognition of uncertain clinical scenarios facilitates identification of areas that would benefit from future research. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions 06/2012; 80(3):E50-81. · 2.51 Impact Factor
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    Roderick Deano, Matthew Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Thiazide diuretics and beta-blockers are first-line therapies for hypertension unless there are compelling indications for other drug classes. Diuretics and beta-blockers, however, may worsen dyslipidemia and glucose tolerance whereas antihypertensive agents in other drug classes may have neutral or beneficial effects. Initial clinical trials of antihypertensive regimens suggested that blood pressure lowering was the most important aspect of therapy and that the adverse effects on lipids and glucose tolerance did not impact clinical outcomes. Newer trials, however, question this finding and implicate these pleotropic effects as contributing to the results of the trials. Patients with cardiometabolic risk factors may have compelling indications for agents that inhibit the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, relegating diuretics and beta-blockers to third-line therapy.
    Current Atherosclerosis Reports 02/2012; 14(1):70-7. · 2.92 Impact Factor
  • Matthew J Sorrentino
    Current Cardiology Reports 08/2011; 13(6):475-7.
  • Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: The patient is a 44-year-old Caucasian male who developed chest discomfort while playing ice hockey. He was seen at his local emergency department where an EKG showed evidence for an acute inferior wall myocardial infarction. Cardiac catheterization documented an occluded right coronary artery which was opened with a percutaneous intervention. In addition, he had a significant coronary stenosis in his left anterior descending and circumflex arteries that eventually led to a three-vessel coronary bypass surgery. His past medical history was otherwise unremarkable. He has a family history of coronary artery disease in his father also at a younger age. KeywordsLipoprotein(a)-Apolipoprotein(a)-Atherothrombosis-Plasminogen
    08/2011: pages 173-179;
  • Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: A 54-year-old African American male patient comes to the office for a preoperative assessment prior to the placement of an A-V fistula for hemodialysis. He was recently diagnosed with end-stage renal disease and started on hemodialysis through a temporary catheter. He has a long standing history of hypertension which has been poorly controlled due in part to lack of compliance with medications because of side effects. In the office, he has no complaints except for fatigue and pain in his legs when he walks. He has no chest pain. There is no history of prior cardiac disease or diabetes. KeywordsChronic kidney disease-Microalbuminuria-Proteinuria-Nephrotic syndrome-Statins
    04/2011: pages 205-218;
  • Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Cardiovascular disease remains the number one cause of death for men and women in this country. Despite this fact, great progress has been made over the past few decades in reducing the number of deaths due to myocardial infarction and stroke. Data from the National Center for Health Statistics from 1970 through 2002 have shown a decline in age-adjusted death rates with the largest percentage decreases in death rates from strokes (63%) and heart disease (52%) [1]. Approximately half of the decline in US deaths from coronary artery disease can be attributable to reductions in major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors including reductions in total cholesterol (24%), systolic blood pressure (20%), smoking (12%), and physical inactivity (5%) [2]. Unfortunately, these reductions were partially offset by the increase in obesity and diabetes which accounted for an increased number of deaths (8% and 10%, respectively) due to heart disease. KeywordsFramingham risk score-Reynolds risk score-High-sensitivity C-reactive protein-Family history
    04/2011: pages 1-11;
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    Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Metabolic syndrome is the designation given to a clustering of interrelated metabolic factors that increase the future risk of the development of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Intraabdominal or visceral obesity appears to be the underlying component of the syndrome that leads to the development of an atherogenic dyslipidemia, endothelial dysfunction and hypertension, insulin resistance, a prothrombotic, and a proinflammatory state. The risk attributed to the metabolic syndrome is likely due to the sum of its individual components. As such, the designation of the metabolic syndrome is an easy and convenient way of characterizing individuals who may be at increased risk for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. KeywordsWaist circumference-Abdominal obesity-Impaired fasting glucose-HDL-cholesterol-Triglycerides
    04/2011: pages 13-39;
  • Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: A high serum cholesterol is a well-established major risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Evidence that supports the lipid hypothesis includes research in animal models, epidemiological studies, studies of genetic forms of hyperlipidemia, and laboratory and clinical trials of cholesterol-lowering therapy. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is the major atherogenic lipoprotein and has been designated the primary target of therapy by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) [1]. KeywordsDirect LDL-LDL phenotyping-Apolipoprotein B-Lipoprotein(a)-High-sensitivity C-reactive protein-Lp-PLA2
    04/2011: pages 77-103;
  • Matthew J. Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains the number one cause of death for men and women in the USA and is rapidly becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing nations as well. The recognition and treatment of coronary risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, smoking, obesity, and diabetes has made a substantial impact on reducing CHD events. The National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines recommend that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) should be the primary target of therapy to reduce cardiovascular events. The HMG CoA reductase inhibitors or statins are effective in lowering LDL-C and have become some of the most prescribed medications in the world. Recent studies have extended the boundaries of treatment to different risk groups and have shown that this treatment strategy is beneficial across the cardiovascular risk spectrum. KeywordsStatins-Hepatotoxicity-Myopathy-Resins-Ezetimibe-Fibrates-Niacin
    04/2011: pages 121-139;
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    ABSTRACT: Factors influencing hypertension (HTN) control in the United States are not well understood. The authors utilized a newly designed survey instrument to interview patients presenting to a diverse, general cardiology practice at a tertiary care center in order to identify factors associated with HTN control. The study was completed in 154 participants, and 121 (78.6%) had HTN. Of those, 111 (91.7%) had awareness of HTN, and 72 (59.5%) had HTN control, defined as <140/90 mm Hg. In a multivariate analysis, race/ethnicity was not associated with HTN control, but private insurance (odds ratio [OR] 3.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.25-9.28), nonsmoker status (OR 4.36, CI 1.22-15.51), and number of medications used (OR 1.32, CI 1.12-1.56) were associated with HTN control. Correct recognition of systolic blood pressure goal and knowledge of one's current state of HTN control were also associated with control. In conclusion, in a general cardiology practice where patients had a high degree of healthcare access, race/ethnicity was not associated with HTN control, while type of insurance, nonsmoker status, and increased number of medications used were associated. In addition, 2 novel predictors of HTN control, recognition of systolic blood pressure goal and knowledge of HTN control, were identified that can be utilized in creating new HTN treatment interventions.
    Journal of Clinical Hypertension 08/2010; 12(8):570-7. · 2.36 Impact Factor
  • Matthew J Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are at high cardiovascular risk and we can consider them to have a risk equivalent to coronary heart disease, putting them into the high-risk category. A mixed dyslipidemia with high triglyceride levels; low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels; and small, dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles is a common pattern in patients with CKD, contributing to their high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. A treatment strategy to reduce LDL cholesterol to the current high-risk category goals reduces risk similar to patients without CKD. Emerging evidence suggests that targeting non-HDL cholesterol can have the potential to bring about further CVD risk reduction. Non-HDL cholesterol should be a secondary target for all patients with CKD. Further studies are needed to determine the magnitude of the risk reduction we can expect to gain by targeting non-HDL cholesterol and the most effective way to treat this target.
    Cardiology clinics 08/2010; 28(3):529-39. · 1.25 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disease that often presents with complaints of lymphadenopathy or is detected as an incidental laboratory finding. It is rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with tamponade or a large, bloody pericardial effusion. In patients without known cancer, a large, bloody pericardial effusion raises the possibility of tuberculosis, particularly in patients from endemic areas. However, the signs, symptoms and laboratory findings of pericarditis related to chronic lymphocytic leukemia can mimic tuberculosis. We report the case of a 58-year-old African American-Nigerian woman with a history of travel to Nigeria and a positive tuberculin skin test who presented with cardiac tamponade. She had a mild fever, lymphocytosis and a bloody pericardial effusion, but cultures and stains were negative for acid-fast bacteria. Assessment of blood by flow cytometry and pericardial biopsy by immunohistochemistry revealed CD5 (+) and CD20 (+) lymphocytes in both tissues, demonstrating this to be an unusual manifestation of early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Although most malignancies that involve the pericardium clinically manifest elsewhere before presenting with tamponade, this case illustrates the potential for early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia to present as a large pericardial effusion with tamponade. Moreover, the presentation mimicked tuberculosis. This case also demonstrates that it is possible to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia-related pericardial tamponade by removal of the fluid without chemotherapy.
    Journal of Medical Case Reports 01/2010; 4:246.
  • Matthew J Sorrentino
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    ABSTRACT: On the basis of traditional risk factors, a large number of individuals in the United States can be classified as at intermediate risk for the development of ischemic heart disease. The diagnosis of the metabolic syndrome can help determine whether patients at intermediate risk should be considered for more aggressive risk-factor reduction. The measurement of novel risk factors, such as inflammatory markers, can identify a group of patients at high intermediate risk. The Adult Treatment Panel of the National Cholesterol Education Program suggests considering a more aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol treatment goal in this group of individuals. In addition, the presence of the metabolic syndrome is highly predictive of the development of diabetes mellitus. A treatment strategy focusing on aerobic exercise and weight loss can help delay or prevent the development of diabetes and can help reduce cardiovascular risk. For significant risk reduction to be achieved, treatment strategies must focus on therapy for all risk factors, including dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance.
    The American Journal of Cardiology 09/2005; 96(4A):3E-7E. · 3.21 Impact Factor