Kathleen E. Rodgers

Keck School of Medicine USC, Los Angeles, California, United States

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Publications (122)264.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Thrombocytopenia is an abnormally low number of platelets in the blood resulting from either too few platelets being produced or existing platelets being destroyed. Severe thrombocytopenia leads to excessive bleeding and can be the result of numerous medical conditions or a side effect of medications or treatments. Although platelet transfusions are typically administered to correct thrombocytopenia, transfusions represent a temporary and unsustainable solution. As there is a limited supply of platelet units available for transfusion, along with the significant financial cost and risk of infection, investigation to uncover mechanisms that boost platelet production may have important clinical and therapeutic implications. Treatment with angiotensin 1 - 7 (A(1 - 7)) has been shown in a preclinical and clinical evaluations to have a positive effect on platelet recovery. Areas covered: The authors provide an overview of the current treatment options available for platelet recovery and highlight the need for alternatives. Following on, the authors discuss the use of A(1 - 7) as a potential therapeutic option for platelet recovery, including its safety and efficacy. Expert opinion: Current evidence provides a good basis for continued research and evaluation of the benefits of A(1 - 7) treatment in stimulating platelet recovery following myelosuppression. A(1 - 7) therapy has the potential to make a significant contribution to healthcare by providing standalone and additive treatments to address unmet medical needs and life-threatening diseases by utilizing the regenerative arm of the renin-angiotensin system.
    Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs 02/2014; · 4.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] is a bioactive peptide of the renin angiotensin system that stimulates the number of bone marrow progenitors and hematopoietic recovery after myelosuppression. We evaluated the combination of A(1-7) with colony-stimulating factors, Neupogen and Epogen, on bone marrow progenitors and the recovery of circulating formed elements following chemotherapy. Mice were injected with gemcitabine followed 2 days later with A(1-7). Circulating blood cells and bone marrow progenitors were measured over time. Combination of A(1-7) with Neupogen (the latter given only 3 days starting at the white blood cell nadir) decreased the amount of Neupogen needed for optimal recovery by 10-fold. The progenitors measured include CFU-GEMM, CFU-GM, CFU-Meg and BFU-E. A(1-7) increased recovery of all progenitors when given alone or in combination with Neupogen above that with Neupogen alone. Combination of A(1-7) with Epogen slightly increased (not significantly) red blood cell concentrations above those achieved by Epogen alone. However, in this model, A(1-7) or A(1-7) in combination with Epogen increased all erythroid progenitors with the largest effect on early erythroid progenitors (immature BFU-E). Neupogen and Epogen acted synergistically with A(1-7) to increase the concentration of myeloid, megakaryocytic and erythroid progenitor cells in the bone marrow following chemotherapy suggesting that A(1-7)'s multilineage effect on early progenitors in the marrow facilitates proliferation in response to lineage-specific growth factors.
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 10/2013; · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized initially by lymphocytic infiltration and destruction of exocrine glands, followed by systemic organ damage and B-cell lymphoma. Conventional treatment is based on management of symptoms and there is a shortage of therapies that address the underlying causes of inflammation at source exocrine tissue. The aim of this study was to test a novel protein polymer-based platform consisting of diblock copolymers composed from Elastin-like Polypeptides (ELPs) fused with FKBP12, to deliver a potent immunosuppressant with dose-limiting toxicity, rapamycin (Rapa) also known as Sirolimus, and evaluate its effects on the inflamed lacrimal gland (LG) of non-obese diabetic mouse (NOD), a classic mouse model of SjS. Both soluble and diblock copolymer ELPs were fused to FKBP12 and characterized with respect to purity, hydrodynamic radii, drug entrapment and release. Both formulations showed successful association with Rapa; however, the nanoparticle formulation, FSI, released drug with nearly a 5 fold longer terminal half-life of 62.5 h. The strong interaction of FSI nanoparticles with Rapa was confirmed in vivo by a shift in the monoexponential pharmacokinetic profile for free drug to a biexponential profile for the nanoparticle formulation. When acutely administered by injection into NOD mice via the tail vein, this FSI formulation significantly suppressed lymphocytic infiltration in the LG relative to the control group while reducing toxicity. There was also a significant effect on inflammatory and mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway genes in the LG and surprisingly, our nanoparticle formulation was significantly better at decreasing a proposed tear biomarker of SjS, cathepsin S (CATS) compared to free drug. These findings suggest that FSI is a promising tool for delivering Rapa for treatment of SjS in a murine model and may be further explored to meet the unmet medical challenge of SjS.
    Journal of Controlled Release 07/2013; · 7.63 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 study evaluated safety and efficacy of A(1-7) for reduction in Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia in patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Pharmacodynamic activity of A(1-7) in platelet production and retention of scheduled dose intensity were also determined. METHODS: Thirty-four patients with ovarian, Fallopian tube, or peritoneal carcinoma receiving gemcitabine and carboplatin or cisplatin were evaluated. Patients were randomized to receive study drug subcutaneously at 100 mcg/kg (n = 11), 300 mcg/kg (n = 13), or placebo (n = 10) following chemotherapy for up to six cycles. Hematologic variables were obtained throughout each treatment cycle. RESULTS: There were no drug-related safety issues. There were no instances of Grade 4 thrombocytopenia in patients who received 100 mcg/kg treatment compared to 6 % of chemotherapy cycles for patients receiving placebo (p = 0.07). The maximal percentage increase in platelet concentration from baseline was higher for patients who received 100 mcg/kg A(1-7) compared to placebo (p = 0.02). This increase was accompanied by a reduction in the nadir absolute neutrophil count (p = 0.04). Relative dose intensity for the combination chemotherapy was higher for patients who received 100 mcg/kg A(1-7) compared to placebo (p = 0.04). There were no differences in outcomes for patients receiving 300 mcg/kg dose compared to placebo. CONCLUSIONS: A 100 mcg/kg dose of A(1-7) was shown to produce pharmacodynamic effects on peripheral blood platelet counts, preserve planned dose intensity, and reduce Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia following gemcitabine and platinum chemotherapy. These findings are consistent with A(1-7)-induced stimulation of thrombogenesis in the bone marrow following marrow-toxic chemotherapy.
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 01/2013; · 2.80 Impact Factor
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    Kathleen E Rodgers, Gere S Dizerega
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    ABSTRACT: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has long been a known endocrine system that is involved in regulation of blood pressure and fluid balance. Over the last two decades, evidence has accrued that shows that there are local RAS that can affect cellular activity, tissue injury, and tissue regeneration. There are locally active ligand peptides, mediators, receptors, and signaling pathways of the RAS in the bone marrow (BM). This system is fundamentally involved and controls the essential steps of primitive and definitive blood-cell production. Hematopoiesis, erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, thrombopoiesis, formation of monocytic and lymphocytic lineages, as well as stromal elements are regulated by the local BM RAS. The expression of a local BM RAS has been shown in very early, primitive embryonic hematopoiesis. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE-1, CD143) is expressed on the surface of hemangioblasts and isolation of the CD143 positive cells allows for recovery of all hemangioblast activity, the first endothelial and hematopoietic cells, forming the marrow cavity in the embryo. CD143 expression also marks long-term blood-forming CD34+ BM cells. Expression of receptors of the RAS is modified in the BM with cellular maturation and by injury. Ligation of the receptors of the RAS has been shown to modify the status of the BM resulting in accelerated hematopoiesis after injury. The aim of the present review is to outline the known functions of the local BM RAS within the context of primitive and definitive hematopoiesis as well as modification of BM recovery by administration of exogenous ligands of the RAS. Targeting the actions of local RAS molecules could represent a valuable therapeutic option for the management of BM recovery after injury as well as neoplastic disorders.
    Frontiers in Endocrinology 01/2013; 4:157.
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    ABSTRACT: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in wound repair; however, little is known pertaining to RAS expression in response to thermal injury and the combination of radiation plus burn injury (CRBI). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that thermal injury modifies expression of RAS components and CRBI delayed this up-regulation of RAS. Skin from uninjured mice was compared with mice receiving local thermal injury or CRBI (injury site). Skin was analyzed for gene and protein expression of RAS components. There was an initial increase in the expression of various components of RAS following thermal injury. However, in the higher CRBI group there is an initial decrease in AT(1b) (vasoconstriction, pro-proliferative), AT(2) (vasodilation, differentiation), and Mas (vasodilation, anti-inflammatory) gene expression. This corresponded with a delay and decrease in AT(1) , AT(2) , and MAS protein expression in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The reduction in RAS receptor positive fibroblasts and keratinocytes correlated with a reduction in collagen deposition and keratinocyte infiltration into the wounded area resulting in a delay of reepithelialization following CRBI. These data support the hypothesis that delayed wound healing observed in subjects following radiation exposure may be in part due to decreased expression of RAS.
    Wound Repair and Regeneration 12/2012; · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: We tested the hypothesis that women with GDM and their fetuses would demonstrate alterations in markers of eNOS uncoupling, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction and these changes would correlate with the levels of hyperglycemia through a pilot observational case-control study of women with GDM and their fetuses. Methods: Levels of sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, CRP, NO, eNOS, p22-phox, and SOD gene expression, and EPC counts in both maternal and cord blood were measured at the time of delivery in women with and without GDM. Results: We demonstrated the presence of decreased maternal circulating EPC counts, increased soluble adhesion molecules in maternal blood, decreased SOD expression in both maternal and cord blood and increased eNOS expression in both maternal and cord blood in women with GDM. Conclusions: These data suggest that the molecular mechanisms behind oxidative stress in women with GDM and their fetuses appear similar to those hypothesized for non-pregnant adults with type 2 DM.
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine: the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians 10/2012; · 1.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase 2 clinical trial explored NorLeu(3)-A(1-7) (DSC127) safety and healing efficacy in diabetic foot ulcers. Patients with chronic, noninfected, neuropathic, or neuroischemic plantar Wagner Grade 1 or 2 foot ulcers (n = 172) were screened for nonhealing. Subjects were randomized to receive 4 weeks' once-daily topical treatment with 0.03% DSC127 (n = 26), 0.01% DSC127 (n = 27), or Placebo (n = 24), followed by 20 weeks' standard of care. DSC127 was assessed for safety (including laboratory values and adverse events), primary efficacy (% ulcers completely epithelialized at Week 12), and durability of effect. Baseline, demography, and safety parameters were compared between intent-to-treat groups and were comparable. Dose-response curves for DSC127 effect on % area reduction from baseline at Week 12 (40% placebo; 67% 0.01% DSC127; 80% 0.03% DSC127) and 24 (23% placebo; 53% 0.01% DSC127; 95% 0.03% DSC127) followed a log-linear pattern for both intent-to-treat and per-protocol populations. Covariate analysis compared reduction in ulcer area, depth, and volume from baseline; reductions in the 0.03% DSC127 group were greater at Weeks 12 and 24. Placebo-treated ulcers healed in a median 22 weeks vs. 8.5 weeks for 0.03%DSC127 (p = 0.04). This study provides preliminary evidence that DSC127 is safe and effective in accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcers.
    Wound Repair and Regeneration 06/2012; 20(4):482-90. · 2.77 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] is a component of the renin angiotensin system (RAS) that stimulates hematopoietic recovery after myelosuppression. In a Phase I/IIa clinical trial, thrombocytopenia after chemotherapy was reduced by A(1-7). In this study, the ability of A(1-7) to improve recovery after total body irradiation (TBI) is shown with specific attention to radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Mice were exposed to TBI (doses of 2-7 Gray [Gy]) of cesium 137 gamma rays, followed by treatment with A(1-7), typical doses were 100-1000 μg/kg given once or once daily for a specified number of days depending on the study. Animals are injected subcutaneously via the nape of the neck with 0.1 ml drug in saline. The recovery of blood and bone marrow cells was determined. Effects of TBI and A(1-7) on survival and bleeding time was also evaluated. Daily administration of A(1-7) after radiation exposure improved survival (from 60% to 92-97%) and reduced bleeding time at day 30 after TBI. Further, A(1-7) increased early mixed progenitors (3- to 5-fold), megakaryocyte (2- to 3-fold), myeloid (3- to 6-fold) and erythroid (2- to 5-fold) progenitors in the bone marrow and reduced radiation-induced thrombocytopenia (RIT) (up to 2-fold). Reduction in the number of treatments to 3 per week also improved bone marrow recovery and reduced RIT. As emergency responder and healthcare systems in case of nuclear accident or/and terrorist attack may be overwhelmed, the consequence of delayed initiation of treatment was ascertained. Treatment with A(1-7) can be delayed up to 5 days and still be effective in the reduction of RIT or acceleration of bone marrow recovery. The data presented in this paper indicate that A(1-7) reduces the consequences of critical radiation exposure and can be initiated well after initial exposure with maximal effects on early responding hematopoietic progenitors when treatment is initiated 2 days after exposure and 5 days after exposure for the later responding progenitors and reduced thrombocytopenia. There was some effect of A(1-7) even when given days after radiation exposure.
    International Journal of Radiation Biology 03/2012; 88(6):466-76. · 1.84 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetics have an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease, in part due to oxidative stress resulting in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) dysfunction. Studies have demonstrated that angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] can activate eNOS activity. As the bone marrow is a primary source of a number of progenitors important in physiological homeostasis and healing, the goal of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of Ang-(1-7) treatment on oxidative stress and the ensuing nitrative stress in diabetic bone marrow and its potential pathways. BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J mice and their heterozygous controls were administered Ang-(1-7) alone or combined with A-779, losartan, PD123,319, L-NAME, or icatibant subcutaneously for 14 days. The bone marrow was then collected to measure NO levels, eNOS phosphorylation, and expression of NOS, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and p22-phox. NO levels in the bone marrow were significantly decreased in diabetic mice, and Ang-(1-7) treatment was able to significantly increase these measures (p<0.01). This effect was blocked by the co-administration of PD123,319, A-779, L-NAME, and icatibant. In addition, Ang-(1-7) treatment reversed the paradoxical increase in eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS) expression, and decreased the phosphorylation of eNOS at Thr495 seen in diabetic mice. Ang-(1-7) also reversed diabetes-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by decreasing p22-phox expression and increasing SOD3 expression, leading to a significant reduction in 3-nitrotyrosine formation in diabetic bone marrow (p<0.05). Our findings demonstrate that Ang-(1-7) administration decreases diabetes-induced oxidative stress in the bone marrow and modifies pathways involved in eNOS dysfunction.
    Endocrinology. 03/2012;
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    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Diabetes is a disorder that is well known to delay wound repair resulting in the formation of colonized, chronic wounds. The resultant ulcers contribute to increased risk of morbidity, including osteomyelitis and amputations, and increased burden to the healthcare system. AREAS COVERED: The only active product approved for the treatment of diabetic ulcers, Regranex, has been shown to reduce amputation risk, but is not widely used due to minimal proven efficacy and recent warnings added to the Instructions for Use. This review provides an overview of the development of NorLeu(3)-angiotensin (1-7) (NorLeu(3)-A(1-7)) as an active agent for the treatment of diabetic wounds. NorLeu(3)-A(1-7) is an analog of the naturally occurring peptide, angiotensin 1-7. The mechanisms of action include induction of progenitor proliferation and accelerated vascularization, collagen deposition and re-epithelialization. EXPERT OPINION: Research to date has shown that NorLeu(3)-A(1-7) is highly effective in the closure of diabetic wounds and is superior to Regranex in animal studies. Further clinical development of this product as a topical agent for the healing of chronic wounds and investigation into the mechanisms by which this product accelerates healing are warranted.
    Expert Opinion on Investigational Drugs 11/2011; 20(11):1575-81. · 4.74 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The objectives of this study were to determine the potential systemic and local toxicity, as well as evaluate the toxicokinetic (TK) profile of angiotensin (1-7) [A(1-7)] when administered daily via subcutaneous injection for 28 days to Sprague-Dawley rats and Beagle dogs. A(1-7) is a member of the renin-angiotensin system and has undergone clinical evaluation for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression. In this present study, A(1-7) was given at 10 mg/(kg day) for 28 days to rats and canines. At day 27, blood was harvested to evaluate the TK parameters. On day 28, systemic toxicology was evaluated. Following A(1-7) administration for 27 days, no plasma A(1-7) accumulation was detected in canines; however, increased A(1-7) plasma concentrations were detected in rats. Despite the accumulation observed in rats, no detectable toxicity was found following A(1-7) administration for 28 days. The TK analysis of A(1-7) revealed a plasma half-life of 20-30 min in both rats and canines. The time to maximum plasma concentration was found to be 15 and 26.25 min in rats and canines, respectively. This study shows that subcutaneous administration of A(1-7) at 10 mg/(kg day) for 28 days did not lead to any detectable toxicities in either rats or canines.
    Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 08/2011; 101(1):373-80. · 3.13 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This study determined the influence of a 2-component polyethylene glycol surgical sealant (Coseal) as an adhesion prevention device on sepsis-related mortality and/or systemic bacterial translocation to the spleen. A bacterial inoculum and telemetry probe were implanted in 50 treated and 49 untreated rats. Telemetry probes monitored core-body temperature to determine time of death. Spleens were collected on day 3 for quantitative bacteriology of Escherichia coli and Bacteroides fragilis. Median survival time and mortality of treated rats (37.0 hours, 54.0%) were noninferior to untreated rats (47.5 hours, 55.1%). Median E coli titers in treated rats (2.24 log colony forming units/spleen) were significantly less than untreated rats (4.32 log colony forming units/spleen). B fragilis titers were not different. This study demonstrates intraperitoneal administration of a 2-component polyethylene glycol surgical sealant as an adhesion prevention device does not alter time to death or sepsis-related mortality and/or systemic bacterial translocation to the spleen.
    American journal of obstetrics and gynecology 11/2010; 203(5):494.e1-6. · 3.97 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: An abstract is unavailable. This article is available as HTML full text and PDF.
    Journal of Pelvic Medicine and Surgery 02/2010; 16(2):S36-S37.
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    ABSTRACT: Tolmetin is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that reduces adhesion formation in several animal models after a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) dose delivered at the time of surgery. We set out to determine the period during which tolmetin could prevent adhesions. Adhesions were induced in New Zealand White rabbits (2-3 kg) by abrading the uterine horns and removing their mesouterine vasculature. Tolmetin sodium (1 mg/5 ml saline) was given at various times relative to the start of surgery as a single dose i.p. One week later adhesions were assessed using a standard scoring system (0 = no adhesions; 1 = light adhesions involving both uterine horns: 2 = more tenacious adhesions to bowel or bladder; 3 = tenacious adhesions to bowel and bladder partly immobilizing the uterus; 4 = completely fixed horns adherent to bowel and bladder). Scores were arranged in ascending rank order. Mean rank positions were calculated for each group and compared against controls (Dunnett's multiple comparison). Tolmetin sodium was most effective when administered within I hour of surgery. Mild effects could still be observed after 4 hours and the effect diminished after 24 hours. When these effects are compared to the temporal biochemical and cellular effects of tolmetin obtained in related studies, the data support the hypothesis that tolmetin reduces adhesions at least in part by modulating fibrinolytic activity of resident macrophages and macrophages present in the early postsurgical period.
    07/2009; 7(6):527-532.
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    ABSTRACT: Post-surgical adhesion formation has numerous deleterious side effects in a wide variety of surgical settings. Physical barriers used together with laparoscopy were developed to reduce tissue trauma seen with open procedures. However, despite surgeons' meticulous techniques and the use of such barriers, adhesion formation remains a serious clinical problem, creating complications that cost the health care system over $1 billion annually. Our laboratories have combined a previously marketed drug, Tranilast, with a sodium carboxymethylcellulose (NaCMC) gel in a sustained release formulation using poly(p-dioxanone) (PDO) to provide a locally delivered medicated device that significantly reduces adhesions. This paper describes the preparation of the gel and the sustained release formulation, its key physical properties, and its sustained release kinetics. Pre-clinical data on inhibition of adhesion formation by the sustained release poly(p-dioxanone)/sodium carboxymethylcellulose/Tranilast drug enhanced device are also presented.
    Biomedical Materials 12/2008; 4(1):015001. · 2.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Postsurgical adhesion formation has numerous deleterious side effects in a wide variety of surgical settings. Physical barriers used together with laparoscopy were developed in hopes of reducing the tissue trauma seen with open procedures and separating tissues during the critical time of healing to reduce adhesion formation. Despite meticulous techniques by surgeons and the availability of barriers, adhesion formation remains a serious problem, with more than $1 billion spent annually on complications arising from adhesions. Our laboratories have combined a previously marketed drug, Tranilast, with a gel to provide a locally delivered medicated device that can reduce adhesion formation. This article will review the role of Tranilast in the key pathways involved in adhesion formation.
    Seminars in Reproductive Medicine 08/2008; 26(4):341-8. · 3.21 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Preclinical studies using the rabbit sidewall and double uterine horn models were used to assess time and dose response of tranilast delivered via subcutaneous pump, p.o., or as an intraperitoneal bolus in viscoelastic gels as well as an intraperitoneal biodegradable poly(p-dioxanone) fiber in reducing adhesions compared to vehicle controls. New Zealand white rabbits underwent laparotomy followed by: 1) uterine horn abrasion and peripheral devascularization or 2) cecal abrasion and sidewall deperitonealization. Tranilast treatment using various vehicles and dosages was compared to vehicle alone versus no treatment. Animals were euthanized after 7 to 21 days. Adhesion formation was assessed by two independent observers. There were reductions in adhesion formation when drug was delivered topically, but oral drug alone was not effective. When tranilast was given preoperatively, oral drug added to the adhesion reduction of intraperitoneal administered drug. Tranilast in a viscoelastic carrier as well as in a biodegradable fiber was effective at reducing adhesions in the double uterine horn model. The slow release of tranilast from a biodegradable rod produced overall the best results. There were no safety issues. Tranilast was effective in reducing adhesions when given in a variety of vehicles in different rabbit models of adhesion formation. Overall, the sustained intraperitoneal delivery of tranilast from biodegradable fibers was the most suitable for clinical testing.
    Journal of Surgical Research 09/2007; 141(2):153-61. · 2.12 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A biomaterial composed of carboxymethylcellulose, poly(ethylene oxide), and calcium can be prepared in a variety of ways to reduce fibrin deposition and adhesion formation. This biomaterial platform can be formulated into a flowable gel with tissue adherence appropriate for use in minimally invasive surgery. The device remains at the site of placement even in gravitationally dependent areas. A peridural formulation was shown in preclinical studies to be safe and effective in reducing adhesions to dura following spinal surgery. A peritoneal formulation used on pelvic organs following peritoneal cavity surgery was also shown to be safe and effective. A clinical feasibility study showed that patients with severe back pain and lower extremity weakness treated with the peridural formulation, applied over their nerve roots following laminectomy or laminotomy, experienced significantly reduced symptoms when compared with surgery-only controls. The peritoneal formulation was shown in two multicenter feasibility studies of women undergoing pelvic surgery to significantly reduce adhesion formation when compared with surgery-only controls. Confirmation of the feasibility studies awaits results from pivotal clinical trials. These formulations were safe, effective, and easy to use. This biomaterial provided a benefit to patients undergoing surgery where postsurgical adhesion formation is a concern.
    Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B Applied Biomaterials 05/2007; 81(1):239-50. · 2.33 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

1k Citations
264.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1989–2013
    • Keck School of Medicine USC
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 1988–2012
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      Los Angeles, California, United States
    • University of Southern California
      • • School of Pharmacy
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Keck School of Medicine
      Los Angeles, CA, United States
  • 2003
    • Los Angeles Mission College
      Los Angeles, California, United States
  • 1999
    • Yamagata University
      Ямагата, Yamagata, Japan
  • 1985–1988
    • University of California, Riverside
      • Division of Biomedical Sciences
      Riverside, CA, United States
  • 1985–1987
    • CSU Mentor
      Long Beach, California, United States