M. Shahbaz Memon

Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany

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Publications (19)1.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The steadily increasing amounts of scientific data and the analysis of 'big data' is a fundamental characteristic in the context of computational simulations that are based on numerical methods or known physical laws. This represents both an opportunity and challenge on different levels for traditional distributed computing approaches, architectures, and infrastructures. On the lowest level data-intensive computing is a challenge since CPU speed has surpassed IO capabilities of HPC resources and on the higher levels complex cross-disciplinary data sharing is envisioned via data infrastructures in order to engage in the fragmented answers to societal challenges. This paper highlights how these levels share the demand for 'high productivity processing' of 'big data' including the sharing and analysis of 'large-scale science data-sets'. The paper will describe approaches such as the high-level European data infrastructure EUDAT as well as low-level requirements arising from HPC simulations used in distributed computing. The paper aims to address the fact that big data analysis methods such as computational steering and visualization, map-reduce, R, and others are around, but a lot of research and evaluations still need to be done to achieve scientific insights with them in the context of traditional distributed computing infrastructures.
    Information & Communication Technology Electronics & Microelectronics (MIPRO), 2013 36th International Convention on; 01/2013
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    ABSTRACT: During the past decade, significant international and broader interdisciplinary research is increasingly carried out by global collaborations that often share resources within a single production e-science infrastructure. More recently, increasing complexity of e-science applications embrace multiple physical models (i.e. multi-physics) and consider longer and more detailed simulation runs as well as a larger range of scales (i.e. multi-scale). This increase in complexity is creating a steadily growing demand for cross-infrastructure operations that take the advantage of multiple e-science infrastructures with a more variety of resource types. Since interoperable e-science infrastructures are still not seamlessly provided today we proposed in earlier work the Infrastructure Interoperability Reference Model (IIRM) that represents a trimmed down version of the Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA) in terms of functionality and complexity, while on the other hand being more specifically useful for production and thus easier to implement. This contribution focuses on several important reference model invariants that are often neglected when infrastructure integration activities are being performed thus hindering seamless interoperability in many aspects. In order to indicate the relevance of our invariant definitions, we provide insights into two accompanying cross-infrastructure use cases of the bio-informatics and fusion science domain.
    25th IEEE International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing, IPDPS 2011, Anchorage, Alaska, USA, 16-20 May 2011 - Workshop Proceedings; 01/2011
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    ABSTRACT: In the last three years activities in Grid computing have changed; in particular in Europe the focus moved from pure research-oriented work on concepts, architectures, interfaces, and protocols towards activities driven by the usage of Grid technologies in day-to-day operation of e-infrastructure and in applicationdriven use cases. This change is also reected in the UNICORE activities [1]. The basic components and services have been established, and now the focus is increasingly on enhancement with higher level services, integration of upcoming standards, deployment in e-infrastructures, setup of interoperability use cases and integration of applications. The development of UNICORE started back more than 10 years ago, when in 1996 users, supercomputer centres and vendors were discussing "what prevents the efficient use of distributed supercomputers?". The result of this discussion was a consensus which still guides UNICORE today: seamless, secure and intuitive access to distributed resources. Since the end of 2002 continuous development of UNICORE took place in several EU-funded projects, with the subsequent broadening of the UNICORE community to participants from across Europe. In 2004 the UNICORE software became open source and since then UNICORE is developed within the open source developer community. Publishing UNICORE as open source under BSD license has promoted a major uptake in the community with contributions from multiple organisations. Today the developer community includes developers from Germany, Poland, Italy, UK, Russia and other countries. The structure of the paper is as follows. In Section 2 the architecture of UNICORE 6 as well as implemented standards are described, while Section 3 focusses on its clients. Section 4 covers recent developments and advancements of UNICORE 6, while in section 5 an outlook on future planned developments is given. The paper closes with a conclusion.
    annals of telecommunications - annales des télécommunications 12/2010; · 0.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: UNICORE is a European Grid Technology with more than 10 years of history. Originating from the Supercomputing domain, the latest version UNICORE 6 has turned into a general-purpose Grid technology that follows established standards and offers a rich set of features to its users. The paper starts with an architectural insight into UNICORE 6, highlighting the workflow features, standards and the different clients. Next, the current state of advancement is presented by describing recent developments. The paper closes with an outlook on future planned developments.
    annals of telecommunications - annales des télécommunications 09/2010; · 0.57 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The interoperability of e-Science infrastructures like DEISA/PRACE and EGEE/EGI is an increasing demand for a wide variety of cross-Grid applications, but interoperability based on common open standards adopted by Grid middleware is only starting to emerge and is not broadly provided today. In earlier work, we have shown how refined open standards form a reference model, which is based on careful academic analysis of lessons learned obtained from production cross-Grid applications that require access to both, High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources as well as High Performance Computing (HPC) resources. This paper provides insights in several concepts of this reference model with a particular focus on the finding of using HPC and HTC resources with the fusion applications BIT1 and a cross-infrastructure workflow based on the HELENA and ILSA fusion applications. Based on lessons learned over years gained with production interoperability setups and experimental interoperability work between production Grids like EGEE, DEISA, and NorduGrid, we illustrate how open Grid standards (e.g. OGSA-BES, JSDL, GLUE2, etc) can be used to overcome several limitations of the production architecture of the EUFORIA framework paving the way to a more standards-based and thus more maintainable and efficient solution.
    Information and Emerging Technologies (ICIET), 2010 International Conference on; 07/2010
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    ABSTRACT: Grid and e-science infrastructure interoperability is an increasing demand for Grid applications but interoperability based on common open standards adopted by Grid middle-wares are only starting to emerge on Grid infrastructures and are not broadly provided today. In earlier work we have shown how open standards can be improved by lessons learned from cross-Grid applications that require access to both, High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources as well as High Performance Computing (HPC) resources. This paper provides more insights in several concepts with a particular focus on effectively describing Grid job descriptions in order to satisfy the demands of e-scientists and their cross-Grid applications. Based on lessons learned over years gained with interoperability setups between production Grids such as EGEE, DEISA, and NorduGrid, we illustrate how common open Grid standards (i.e. JSDL and GLUE2) can take cross-Grid application experience into account.
    Parallel & Distributed Processing, Workshops and Phd Forum (IPDPSW), 2010 IEEE International Symposium on; 05/2010
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    24th IEEE International Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing, IPDPS 2010, Atlanta, Georgia, USA, 19-23 April 2010 - Workshop Proceedings; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: E-health makes use of information and communication methods and the latest e-research tools to support the understanding of body functions. E-scientists in this field take already advantage of one single infrastructure to perform computationally-intensive investigations of the human body that tend to consider each of the constituent parts separately without taking into account the multiple important interactions between them. But these important interactions imply an increasing complexity of applications that embrace multiple physical models (i.e. multi-physics) and consider a larger range of scales (i.e. multi-scale) thus creating a steadily growing demand for interoperable infrastructures that allow for new innovative application types of jointly using different infrastructures for one application. But interoperable infrastructures are still not seamlessly provided and we argue that this is due to the absence of a realistically implementable infrastructure interoperability reference model that is based on lessons learned from e-science usage. Therefore, the goal of this paper is to explore the potential of using multiple infrastructures for one scientific goal with a particular focus on e-health. Since e-scientists gain more interest in using multiple infrastructures there is a clear demand for interoperability between them to enable a use with one e-research tool. The paper highlights work in the context of an e-Health blood flow application while the reference model is applicable to other e-science applications as well.
    10th IEEE/ACM International Conference on Cluster, Cloud and Grid Computing, CCGrid 2010, 17-20 May 2010, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; 01/2010
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    ABSTRACT: This paper evaluates the performance of the emerging OGF standard OGSA - Basic Execution Service (BES) on three fundamentally different Grid middleware platforms: UNICORE 5/6, Globus Toolkit 4 and gLite. The particular focus within this paper is on the OGSA-BES implementation of UNICORE 6. A comparison is made with baseline measurements, for UNICORE 6 and Globus Toolkit 4, using the legacy job submission interfaces. Our results show that the BES components are comparable in performance to existing legacy interfaces. We also have a strong indication that other factors, attributable to the supporting infrastructure, have a bigger impact on performance than BES components.
    04/2009: pages 113-122;
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    ABSTRACT: The Grid provides access to execution and storage resources - through middleware - by normalizing the access to resources. UNICORE calls this quality dasiaseamlessnesspsila. One result of this is that a request for some action at one resource can, with relative ease, be re-targeted to another, making possible the coordinated usage of multiple resources. In this paper we describe a seamless interface to heterogeneous storage systems, using the (Semantic) Web as middleware for the Grid. Data is accumulated by experiments and simulations running on execution systems, instruments and sensors, and by importing data from other locations. Storage systems are regular file systems connected to the execution systems, and also distributed storage systems such as iRODS, or Cloud storage such as Amazon S3. All should be available seamlessly. Given increasing volumes, sophisticated tools to help manage data are needed. Furthermore, following the Grid idea, we should be able to perform this across multiple storage systems in a coordinated manner. By Web-enabling e-infrastructure it will make it significantly easier and more accessible for both users and developers wanting to develop new applications for users, and will provide improved functionality for eScientists in key areas such as global data management, search, metadata and collaboration support. The message is that ubiquity and simplicity is better. Semantic Web technologies and the principals of LinkedData are used to describe resources and relationships with other resources, both generally and for specific domains. Detailed information can be extracted by navigating and querying the resulting graph. In addition collaborative capabilities are built into the middleware allowing resources to be selectively (or indiscriminately) shared.
    01/2009;
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    ABSTRACT: Many e-science applications take already advantage of numerous e-science infrastructures that evolved differently over the last couple of years. Along with this evolution, we observe still slow adoption of the open grid services architecture (OGSA) concept and thus interoperability between these infrastructures is still not seamlessly provided today. We argue that this is due to the absence of a realistically implementable reference model in Grids. In this contribution, we present our approach as one element of this reference model that focuses on the missing link between two emerging standards in the field of job management and information models in order to facilitate common open standards-based Grid interoperability.
    8th IEEE/ACIS International Conference on Computer and Information Science, IEEE/ACIS ICIS 2009, June 1-3, 2009, Shanghai, China; 01/2009
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    ABSTRACT: The heterogeneity of Grid resources (e.g. compute, storage, and network) that are geographically dispersed creates a fundamental challenge in terms of their discovery and monitoring process in production Grids today. In order to overcome these challenges, a wide variety of information models and services are developed that provide proprietary solutions in rather complex ways. Many of those services lack simplicity with respect to the setup, resource registration, maintenance, and security, thus making the information system complex and hard to use, especially in Grids driven by High Performance Computing (HPC) needs such as DEISA. In this paper we present a Common Information Service (CIS), which represents an information service, which aims to provide the functionality required to seamlessly aggregate and expose Grid resource information from various heterogeneous resources. The contribution of this paper is about using the emerging OGF GLUE2 standard information model for structuring Grid resource information in order to achieve the interoperability with other Grid technologies in general and other information systems in particular. Using this standard, our contribution provides insights of how CIS publishes and discovers resource and service information in the context of Web services based UNICORE Grids (e.g. DEISA, D-Grid) and highlights example deployments of the D-Mon project. Since the availability of up-to-date information is essential for Grid interoperability, we furthermore provide insights of how CIS can be used to contribute to cross-Grid applications based on the Infrastructure Interoperability Reference Model (IIRM).
    01/2009;
  • High Speed and Large Scale Scientific Computing [post-proceedings of the High Performance Computing Workshop, HPC 2008, Cetraro, Italy, June 30 - July 4, 2008]; 01/2008
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    ABSTRACT: Self-adaptive systems are capable of changing their behaviour at runtime to meet target constraints. An important research question is how quality of service models can inform runtime adaptation. We sketch one solution to this question by application ...
    Proceedings of the 2007 Eleventh International IEEE EDOC Conference Workshop - Volume 00; 10/2007
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the Virtual Organization Membership Service (VOMS) emerged within Grid infrastructures providing dynamic, fine-grained, access control needed to enable resource sharing across Virtual Organization (VOs). VOMS allows to manage authorization information in a VO scope to enforce agreements established between VOs and resource owners. VOMS is used for authorization in the EGEE and OSG infrastructures and is a core component of the respective middleware stacks gLite and VDT. While a module for supporting VOMS is also available as part of the authorization service of the Globus Toolkit, there is currently no support for VO-level authorization within the new Web services-based UNICORE 6. This paper describes the evolution of VOMS towards an open standard compliant service based on the Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML), which in turn provides mechanisms to fill the VO-level authorization service gap within Web service-based UNICORE Grids. In addition, the SAML-based VOMS allows for cross middleware VO management through open standards.
    Euro-Par 2007 Workshops: Parallel Processing, HPPC 2007, UNICORE Summit 2007, and VHPC 2007, Rennes, France, August 28-31, 2007, Revised Selected Papers; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: Many existing Grid technologies and resource management systems lack a standardized job submission interface in Grid environments or e-Infrastructures. Even if the same language for job description is used, often the interface for job submission is also different in each of these technologies. The evolvement of the standardized Job Submission and Description Language (JSDL) as well as the OGSA - Basic Execution Services (OGSA-BES) pave the way to improve the interoperability of all these technologies enabling cross-Grid job submission and better resource management capabilities. In addition, the BytelO standards provide useful mechanisms for data access that can be used in conjunction with these improved resource management capabilities. This paper describes the integration of these standards into the recently released UNICORE 6 Grid middleware that is based on open standards such as the Web Services Resource Framework (WS-RF) and WS-Addressing (WS-A).
    13th International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems (ICPADS 2007), December 5-7, 2007, Hsinchu, Taiwan; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The UNICORE grid system provides a seamless, secure and intuitive access to distributed grid resources. In recent years, UNICORE 5 is used as a well-tested grid middleware system in production grids (e.g. DEISA, D-Grid) and at many supercomputer centers world-wide. Beyond this production usage, UNICORE serves as a solid basis in many European and International research projects and business scenarios from T-Systems, Philips Research, Intel, Fujitsu and others. To foster ongoing developments in multiple projects, UNICORE is open source under BSD license at SourceForge. More recently, the new Web services-based UNICORE 6 has become available that is based on open standards such as the Web services addressing (WS-A) and the Web services resource framework (WS-RF) and thus conforms to the open grid services architecture (OGSA) of the open grid forum (OGF). In this paper we present the evolution from production UNICORE 5 to the open standards-based UNICORE 6 and its various Web services-based interfaces. It describes the interface integration of emerging open standards such as OGSA-BES and OGSA-RUS and thus provides an overview of UNICORE 6.
    Workshops Proceedings of the 11th International IEEE Enterprise Distributed Object Computing Conference, ECOCW 2007, 15-16 October 2007, Annapolis, Maryland, USA; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: The provision and processing of information in an e- Science environment are essential tasks. For this purpose, most environments provide information services which aggregate data from different information sources and make it available to users and other services. In this paper we present CIS, an extensible information service with an underlying unified information model. Designed according to service-oriented architectural principles, CIS consumes data from sources like Ganglia, formats it according to the Common Information Model, and delivers it against XQuery requests. We realised the information service in a Web Services environment and integrated it into an implied volatility application within the NextGRID project and the UNICORE middleware.
    Third International Conference on e-Science and Grid Computing, e-Science 2007, 10-13 December 2007, Bangalore, India; 01/2007
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    ABSTRACT: In the last couple of years, many e-Science infrastructures have begun to offer production services to e-Scientists with an increasing number of applications that require access to different kinds of computational resources. Within Europe two rather different multi-national e-Science infrastructures evolved over time namely Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA) and Enabling Grids for E-SciencE (EGEE). DEISA provides access to massively parallel systems such as supercomputers that are well suited for scientific applications that require many interactions between their typically high numbers of CPUs. EGEE on the other hand provides access to a world-wide Grid of university clusters and PC pools that are well suited for farming applications that require less or even no interactions between the distributed CPUs. While DEISA uses the HPC-driven Grid technology UNICORE, EGEE is based on the gLite Grid middleware optimized for farming jobs. Both have less adoption of open standards and therefore both systems are technically non-interoperable, which means that no e-Scientist can easily leverage the DEISA and EGEE infrastructure with one suitable client environment for scientific applications. This paper argues that future interoperability of such large e-Science infrastructures is required to improve e-Science in general and to increase the real scientific impact of world-wide Grids in particular. We discuss the interoperability achieved by the OMII-Europe project that fundamentally improved the interoperability between UNICORE and gLite by using open standards. We also outline one specific scientific scenario of the WISDOM initiative that actually benefits from the recently established interoperability.