Yolanda E Hartman

University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, United States

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Publications (8)24.89 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Complete surgical resection of breast cancer is a powerful determinant of patient outcome, and failure to achieve negative margins results in reoperation in between 30% and 60% of patients. We hypothesize that repurposing Food and Drug Administration-approved antibodies as tumor-targeting diagnostic molecules can function as optical contrast agents to identify the boundaries of malignant tissue intraoperatively. The monoclonal antibodies bevacizumab, cetuximab, panitumumab, trastuzumab, and tocilizumab were covalently linked to a near-infrared fluorescence probe (IRDye800CW) and in vitro binding assays were performed to confirm ligand-specific binding. Nude mice bearing human breast cancer flank tumors were intravenously injected with the antibody-IRDye800 bioconjugates and imaged over time. Tumor resections were performed using the SPY and Pearl Impulse systems, and the presence or absence of tumor was confirmed by conventional and fluorescence histology. Tumor was distinguishable from normal tissue using both SPY and Pearl systems, with both platforms being able to detect tumor as small as 0.5 mg. Serial surgical resections demonstrated that real-time fluorescence can differentiate subclinical segments of disease. Pathologic examination of samples by conventional and optical histology using the Odyssey scanner confirmed that the bioconjugates were specific for tumor cells and allowed accurate differentiation of malignant areas from normal tissue. Human breast cancer tumors can be imaged in vivo with multiple optical imaging platforms using near-infrared fluorescently labeled antibodies. These data support additional preclinical investigations for improving the surgical resection of malignancies with the goal of eventual clinical translation.
    Journal of Surgical Research 11/2013; · 2.02 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Despite advances in treatment modalities, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenge to treat with poor survival and high morbidity, necessitating a therapy with greater efficacy. EDC22 is an extracellular drug conjugate of the monoclonal antibody targeting CD147 (glycoprotein highly expressed on HNSCC cells) linked with a small drug molecule inhibitor of Na, K-ATPase. In this study, EDC22's potential as a treatment modality for HNSCC was performed. HNSCC cell lines (FADU, OSC-19, Cal27, SCC-1) were cultured in vitro and proliferation and cell viability were assessed following treatment with a range of concentrations of EDC22 (0.25-5.00μg/mL). Mice bearing HNSCC xenografts (OSC-19, SCC-1) were treated with either EDC22 (3-10mg/kg), anti-CD147 monoclonal antibody, cisplatin (1mg/kg) or radiation therapy (2Gy/week) monotherapy or in combination. In vitro, treatment with minimal concentration of EDC22 (0.25μg/mL) significantly decreased cellular proliferation and cell viability (p<0.0001). In vivo, systemic treatment with EDC22 significantly decreased primary tumor growth rate in both an orthotopic mouse model (OSC-19) and a flank tumor mouse model (SCC-1) (p<0.05). In addition, EDC22 therapy resulted in a greater reduction in tumor growth in vivo compared to radiation monotherapy (p<0.05) and a similar reduction in tumor growth compared to cisplatin monotherapy. Combination therapy provided no significant further reduction in tumor growth relative to EDC22 monotherapy. EDC22 is a potent inhibitor of HNSCC cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, warranting further investigations of its clinical potential in the treatment of HNSCC.
    Oral Oncology 08/2013; · 2.70 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis.
    Experimental Cell Research 05/2012; 318(14):1788-98. · 3.56 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is a complex disease process involving interactions with carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and endothelial cells. We further investigated these relationships by suppressing stromal cell growth through the inhibition of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). Preclinical investigation. HNSCC cell lines (FADU, OSC19, Cal27, SCC1, SCC5, SCC22A), fibroblast (HS27), and endothelial cells (human umbilical vascular endothelial cell) were cultured individually or in coculture. Proliferation was assessed following treatment with a range of physiologic concentrations of FGFR inhibitor PD173074. Mice bearing established HNSCC xenografts were treated with PD173074 (12 mg/kg), and tumor histology was analyzed for stromal composition, proliferation (Ki67 staining), and apoptosis (TUNEL [terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling] staining). In vitro, inhibition of FGFR with PD173074 dramatically reduced proliferation of fibroblasts and endothelial cells compared to untreated controls. However, HNSCC cell proliferation was not affected by inhibition of FGFR. When cocultured with fibroblasts, HNSCC cells proliferation increased by 15% to 80% (P < .01). Furthermore, this fibroblast-enhanced tumor cell growth was suppressed by FGFR inhibition. Additionally, treatment of mice bearing HNSCC xenografts with PD173074 resulted in significant growth inhibition (P < .001). Additionally, those tumors from mice treated with PD173074 had a smaller stromal component, decreased proliferation, and increased apoptosis. Targeting the FGFR pathway in head and neck cancer acts through the stromal components to decrease HNSCC growth in vivo and in vitro.
    The Laryngoscope 03/2012; 122(7):1539-44. · 1.98 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors (HNSCC) contain a dense fibrous stroma which is known to promote tumor growth, although the mechanism of stroma-mediated growth remains unclear. As dysplastic mucosal epithelium progresses to cancer, there is incremental overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN) which is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we present evidence that gain of EMMPRIN expression allows tumor growth to be less dependent on fibroblasts by modulating fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) signaling. We show that silencing EMMPRIN in FaDu and SCC-5 HNSCC cell lines inhibits cell growth, but when EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells were cocultured with fibroblasts or inoculated with fibroblasts into severe combined immunodeficient mice, the growth inhibition by silencing EMMPRIN was blunted by the presence of fibroblasts. Coculture experiments showed fibroblast-dependent tumor cell growth occurred via a paracrine signaling. Analysis of tumor gene expression revealed expression of FGFR2 was inversely related to EMMPRIN expression. To determine the role of FGFR2 signaling in EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells, ligands and inhibitors of FGFR2 were assessed. Both FGF1 and FGF2 enhanced tumor growth in EMMPRIN-silenced cells compared with control vector-transfected cells, whereas inhibition of FGFR2 with blocking antibody or with a synthetic inhibitor (PD173074) inhibited tumor cell growth in fibroblast coculture, suggesting the importance of FGFR2 signaling in fibroblast-mediated tumor growth. Analysis of xenografted tumors revealed that EMMPRIN-silenced tumors had a larger stromal compartment compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that EMMPRIN acquired during tumor progression promotes fibroblast-independent tumor growth.
    Molecular Cancer Research 06/2011; 9(8):1008-17. · 4.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an important life-support system used in neonates and young children with intractable cardiorespiratory failure. In this study, we used our porcine neonatal model of venoarterial ECMO to investigate whether ECMO causes gut barrier dysfunction. We subjected 3-wk-old previously healthy piglets to venoarterial ECMO for up to 8 h and evaluated gut mucosal permeability, bacterial translocation, plasma levels of bacterial products, and ultrastructural changes in gut epithelium. We also measured plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels in a small cohort of human neonates receiving ECMO. In our porcine model, ECMO caused a rapid increase in gut mucosal permeability within the first 2 h of treatment, leading to a 6- to 10-fold rise in circulating bacterial products. These changes in barrier function were associated with cytoskeletal condensation in epithelial cells, which was explained by phosphorylation of a myosin II regulatory light chain. In support of these findings, we also detected elevated plasma LPS levels in human neonates receiving ECMO, indicating a similar loss of gut barrier function in these infants. On the basis of these data, we conclude that ECMO is an independent cause of gut barrier dysfunction and bacterial translocation may be an important contributor to ECMO-related inflammation.
    Pediatric Research 05/2010; 68(2):128-33. · 2.67 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a life-saving support system used in neonates and young children with severe cardiorespiratory failure. Although ECMO has reduced mortality in these critically ill patients, almost all patients treated with ECMO develop a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) characterized by a 'cytokine storm', leukocyte activation, and multisystem organ dysfunction. We used a neonatal porcine model of ECMO to investigate whether rising plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines during ECMO reflect de novo synthesis of these mediators in inflamed tissues, and therefore, can be used to assess the severity of ECMO-related SIRS. Previously healthy piglets (3-week-old) were subjected to venoarterial ECMO for up to 8 h. SIRS was assessed by histopathological analysis, measurement of neutrophil activation (flow cytometry), plasma cytokine concentrations (enzyme immunoassays), and tissue expression of inflammatory genes (PCR/western blots). Mast cell degranulation was investigated by measurement of plasma tryptase activity. Porcine neonatal ECMO was associated with systemic inflammatory changes similar to those seen in human neonates. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) concentrations rose rapidly during the first 2 h of ECMO, faster than the tissue expression of these cytokines. ECMO was associated with increased plasma mast cell tryptase activity, indicating that increased plasma concentrations of inflammatory cytokines during ECMO may result from mast cell degranulation and associated release of preformed cytokines stored in mast cells. TNF-alpha and IL-8 concentrations rose faster in plasma than in the peripheral tissues during ECMO, indicating that rising plasma levels of these cytokines immediately after the initiation of ECMO may not reflect increasing tissue synthesis of these cytokines. Mobilization of preformed cellular stores of inflammatory cytokines such as in mucosal mast cells may have an important pathophysiological role in ECMO-related SIRS.
    Laboratory Investigation 11/2009; 90(1):128-39. · 3.96 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Macrophages are first seen in the fetal intestine at 11-12 wk and rapidly increase in number during the 12- to 22-wk period of gestation. The development of macrophage populations in the fetal intestine precedes the appearance of lymphocytes and neutrophils and does not require the presence of dietary or microbial antigens. In this study, we investigated the role of chemerin, a recently discovered, relatively selective chemoattractant for macrophages, in the recruitment of macrophage precursors to the fetal intestine. Chemerin mRNA/protein expression was measured in jejunoileal tissue from 10- to 24-wk human fetuses, neonates operated for intestinal obstruction, and adults undergoing bariatric surgery. The expression of chemerin in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was confirmed by using cultured primary IECs and IEC-like cell lines in vitro. The regulatory mechanisms involved in chemerin expression were investigated by in silico and immunolocalization techniques. IECs in the fetal, but not mature, intestine express chemerin. Chemerin expression peaked in the fetal intestine at 20-24 wk and then decreased to original low levels by full term. During the 10- to 24-wk period, chemerin accounted for most of the macrophage chemotactic activity of cultured fetal IECs. The maturational changes in chemerin expression correlated with the expression of retinoic acid receptor-beta in the intestine. Chemerin is an important mediator of epithelial-macrophage cross talk in the fetal/premature, but not in the mature, intestine. Understanding the regulation of the gut macrophage pool is an important step in development of novel strategies to boost mucosal immunity in premature infants and other patient populations at risk of microbial translocation.
    AJP Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology 06/2009; 297(1):G1-G10. · 3.65 Impact Factor