Ankur Jain

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, United States

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Publications (14)127.3 Total impact

  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 12/2014; 111(50):17833-17838. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1419425111 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We report a surface passivation method based on dichlorodimethylsilane (DDS)-Tween-20 for in vitro single-molecule studies, which, under the conditions tested here, more efficiently prevented nonspecific binding of biomolecules than the standard poly(ethylene glycol) surface. The DDS-Tween-20 surface was simple and inexpensive to prepare and did not perturb the behavior and activities of tethered biomolecules. It can also be used for single-molecule imaging in the presence of high concentrations of labeled species in solution.
    Nature Methods 10/2014; 106(2). DOI:10.1038/nmeth.3143 · 25.95 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Progress towards a complete model of the methanogenic archaeum Methanosarcina acetivorans is reported. We characterized size distribution of the cells using differential interference contrast microscopy, finding them to be ellipsoidal with mean length and width of 2.9 μ m and 2.3 μ m, respectively, when grown on methanol and 30% smaller when grown on acetate. We used the single molecule pull down (SiMPull) technique to measure average copy number of the Mcr complex and ribosomes. A kinetic model for the methanogenesis pathways based on biochemical studies and recent metabolic reconstructions for several related methanogens is presented. In this model, 26 reactions in the methanogenesis pathways are coupled to a cell mass production reaction that updates enzyme concentrations. RNA expression data (RNA-seq) measured for cell cultures grown on acetate and methanol is used to estimate relative protein production per mole of ATP consumed. The model captures the experimentally observed methane production rates for cells growing on methanol and is most sensitive to the number of methyl-coenzyme-M reductase (Mcr) and methyl-tetrahydromethanopterin:coenzyme-M methyltransferase (Mtr) proteins. A draft transcriptional regulation network based on known interactions is proposed which we intend to integrate with the kinetic model to allow dynamic regulation.
    Archaea 03/2014; 2014:898453. DOI:10.1155/2014/898453 · 2.03 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 01/2014; 106(2):380a. DOI:10.1016/j.bpj.2013.11.2148 · 3.83 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The cytosolic pathogen sensor RIG-I is activated by RNAs with exposed 5'-triphosphate (5'-ppp) and terminal double-stranded structures, such as those that are generated during viral infection. RIG-I has been shown to translocate on dsRNA in an ATP-dependent manner. However, the precise role of the ATPase activity in RIG-I activation remains unclear. Using in vitro-transcribed Sendai virus defective interfering RNA as a model ligand, we show that RIG-I oligomerizes on 5'-ppp dsRNA in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent and dsRNA length-dependent manner, which correlates with the strength of type-I interferon (IFN-I) activation. These results establish a clear role for the ligand-induced ATPase activity of RIG-I in the stimulation of the IFN response.
    EMBO Reports 07/2013; DOI:10.1038/embor.2013.102 · 7.86 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a master regulator of essential cellular and developmental processes, including cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and metabolism. mTOR is found in at least two biochemically and functionally distinct complexes named mTORC1 and mTORC2. Previous biochemical studies have indicated that mTOR complexes may oligomerize, and structural studies of purified mTORC1 indicate it is a dimer. However, the molecular organization and subunit composition of mTORC2 remains unclear. Here we utilize the recently developed single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull) assay, which combines the principles of the conventional pull-down assay with single molecule fluorescent microscopy, to probe the stoichiometry of both mTOR complexes. We have determined the copy number of the subunits of each complex in crude cell lysates. We find that the subunits Raptor, PRAS40, mLST8 and mTOR of mTORC1 are each present in a copy number of two, consistent with the dimeric organization of mTORC1 revealed by a reported cryo-EM study. Our data suggest that mTORC2 is also dimeric, with the subunits Rictor, mSin1, mLST8, and mTOR each present in a copy number of two. Interestingly, the mTOR-mLST8, Raptor-PRAS40, and Rictor-mSin1 sub-complexes are all monomeric, suggesting that no single subunit serves as the dimerizing component but rather subcomplexes interact to form the dimeric holocomplex. Our results provide insights into mTOR complexes assembly, which may guide future mechanistic studies and exploration of therapeutic potentials.
    2012 Society for Advancement of Hispanics/Chicanos and Native Americans in Science National Conference; 10/2012
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    ABSTRACT: Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC.
    Journal of Biological Chemistry 07/2012; 287(37):31172-84. DOI:10.1074/jbc.M112.387704 · 4.60 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: In eukaryotes, initiation of DNA replication requires the assembly of a multiprotein prereplicative complex (pre-RC) at the origins. We recently reported that a WD repeat-containing protein, origin recognition complex (ORC)-associated (ORCA/LRWD1), plays a crucial role in stabilizing ORC to chromatin. Here, we find that ORCA is required for the G(1)-to-S-phase transition in human cells. In addition to binding to ORC, ORCA associates with Cdt1 and its inhibitor, geminin. Single-molecule pulldown experiments demonstrate that each molecule of ORCA can bind to one molecule of ORC, one molecule of Cdt1, and two molecules of geminin. Further, ORCA directly interacts with the N terminus of Orc2, and the stability of ORCA is dependent on its association with Orc2. ORCA associates with Orc2 throughout the cell cycle, with Cdt1 during mitosis and G(1), and with geminin in post-G(1) cells. Overexpression of geminin results in the loss of interaction between ORCA and Cdt1, suggesting that increased levels of geminin in post-G(1) cells titrate Cdt1 away from ORCA. We propose that the dynamic association of ORCA with pre-RC components modulates the assembly of its interacting partners on chromatin and facilitates DNA replication initiation.
    Molecular and Cellular Biology 05/2012; 32(15):3107-20. DOI:10.1128/MCB.00362-12 · 5.04 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: This protocol describes a single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) assay for analyzing physiological protein complexes. The assay combines the conventional pull-down assay with single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and allows the probing of single macromolecular complexes directly from cell or tissue extracts. In this method, antibodies against the protein of interest are immobilized on a passivated microscope slide. When cell extracts are applied, the surface-tethered antibody captures the protein together with its physiological interaction partners. After washing away the unbound components, single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is used to probe the pulled-down proteins. Captured proteins are visualized through genetically encoded fluorescent protein tags or through antibody labeling. Compared with western blot analysis, this ultrasensitive assay requires considerably less time and reagents and provides quantitative data. Furthermore, SiMPull can distinguish between multiple association states of the same protein. SiMPull is generally applicable to proteins from a variety of cellular contexts and to endogenous proteins. Starting with the cell extracts and passivated slides, the assay requires 1.5-2.5 h for data acquisition and analysis.
    Nature Protocol 02/2012; 7(3):445-52. DOI:10.1038/nprot.2011.452 · 8.36 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) tether the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) to intracellular sites where they preferentially phosphorylate target substrates. Most AKAPs exhibit nanomolar affinity for the regulatory (RII) subunit of the type II PKA holoenzyme, whereas dual-specificity anchoring proteins also bind the type I (RI) regulatory subunit of PKA with 10-100-fold lower affinity. A range of cellular, biochemical, biophysical, and genetic approaches comprehensively establish that sphingosine kinase interacting protein (SKIP) is a truly type I-specific AKAP. Mapping studies located anchoring sites between residues 925-949 and 1,140-1,175 of SKIP that bind RI with dissociation constants of 73 and 774 nM, respectively. Molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis approaches identify Phe 929 and Tyr 1,151 as RI-selective binding determinants in each anchoring site. SKIP complexes exist in different states of RI-occupancy as single-molecule pull-down photobleaching experiments show that 41 ± 10% of SKIP sequesters two YFP-RI dimers, whereas 59 ± 10% of the anchoring protein binds a single YFP-RI dimer. Imaging, proteomic analysis, and subcellular fractionation experiments reveal that SKIP is enriched at the inner mitochondrial membrane where it associates with a prominent PKA substrate, the coiled-coil helix protein ChChd3.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 11/2011; 108(48):E1227-35. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1107182108 · 9.81 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Proteins perform most cellular functions in macromolecular complexes. The same protein often participates in different complexes to exhibit diverse functionality. Current ensemble approaches of identifying cellular protein interactions cannot reveal physiological permutations of these interactions. Here we describe a single-molecule pull-down (SiMPull) assay that combines the principles of a conventional pull-down assay with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy and enables direct visualization of individual cellular protein complexes. SiMPull can reveal how many proteins and of which kinds are present in the in vivo complex, as we show using protein kinase A. We then demonstrate a wide applicability to various signalling proteins found in the cytosol, membrane and cellular organelles, and to endogenous protein complexes from animal tissue extracts. The pulled-down proteins are functional and are used, without further processing, for single-molecule biochemical studies. SiMPull should provide a rapid, sensitive and robust platform for analysing protein assemblies in biological pathways.
    Nature 05/2011; 473(7348):484-8. DOI:10.1038/nature10016 · 42.35 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We have developed an experimental platform to control and modify the DNA on a DNA-Single Walled Nanotube (SWNT) complex for the purpose of detecting labeled and unlabeled protein-DNA interactions via visible fluorescence. By exploiting the distance-dependent photophysical interaction between organic fluorophores and the surface of a SWNT as the sensing mechanism, fluorophore-conjugated DNA-SWNTs are immobilized and observed using single molecule-total internal reflection microscopy. By analyzing the number of molecules, photobleaching steps and the absolute size of the observed DNA-SWNTs, we have confirmed the presence of a duplex, partial duplex and single-strand DNA scaffold on the SWNT surface using both nucleic acids and proteins as probes. Our approach offers multiple experimental schemes to extend the current use of carbon nanotubes for applications involving the interaction with biologically relevant molecules.
  • Biophysical Journal 02/2011; 100(3). DOI:10.1016/j.bpj.2010.12.2792 · 3.83 Impact Factor
  • Biophysical Journal 02/2009; 96(3). DOI:10.1016/j.bpj.2008.12.015 · 3.83 Impact Factor