Luke C Gandolfo

University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

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Publications (7)49.32 Total impact

  • Luke C Gandolfo · Melanie Bahlo · Terence P Speed
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    ABSTRACT: We present a method for estimating the age of a mutation based on the genetic length of ancestral haplotypes shared between individuals carrying the mutation. The method can be reliably applied to small samples, typical of situations involving rare mutations, and makes effective use of modern high-density SNP data, thus overcoming two of the limitations with existing methods. The method provides age estimates and confidence intervals without the use of asymptotic theory, and is applicable to genealogies where the data is independent or correlated. In the correlated case we estimate the correlation directly from the data, rather than relying on a model for the genealogy. To demonstrate the method's efficacy, we provide simulation results and compare it to other methods. The length data is obtained with a simple procedure, and an R script is available for performing the calculations.
    Genetics 05/2014; 197(4). DOI:10.1534/genetics.114.164616 · 4.87 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Leigh syndrome (LS) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder with characteristic bilateral lesions, typically in the brainstem and basal ganglia. It usually presents in infancy and is genetically heterogeneous, but most individuals with mitochondrial complex IV (or cytochrome c oxidase) deficiency have mutations in the biogenesis factor SURF1. We studied eight complex IV-deficient LS individuals from six families of Lebanese origin. They differed from individuals with SURF1 mutations in having seizures as a prominent feature. Complementation analysis suggested they had mutation(s) in the same gene but targeted massively parallel sequencing (MPS) of 1,034 genes encoding known mitochondrial proteins failed to identify a likely candidate. Linkage and haplotype analyses mapped the location of the gene to chromosome 19 and targeted MPS of the linkage region identified a homozygous c.3G>C (p.Met1?) mutation in C19orf79. Abolishing the initiation codon could potentially still allow initiation at a downstream methionine residue but we showed that this would not result in a functional protein. We confirmed that mutation of this gene was causative by lentiviral-mediated phenotypic correction. C19orf79 was recently renamed PET100 and predicted to encode a complex IV biogenesis factor. We showed that it is located in the mitochondrial inner membrane and forms a ∼300 kDa subcomplex with complex IV subunits. Previous proteomic analyses of mitochondria had overlooked PET100 because its small size was below the cutoff for annotating bona fide proteins. The mutation was estimated to have arisen at least 520 years ago, explaining how the families could have different religions and different geographic origins within Lebanon.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 01/2014; 94(2). DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2013.12.015 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: We previously identified a homozygous mutation in the Golgi SNAP receptor complex 2 gene (GOSR2) in six patients with progressive myoclonus epilepsy. To define the syndrome better we analysed the clinical and electrophysiological phenotype in 12 patients with GOSR2 mutations, including six new unrelated subjects. Clinical presentation was remarkably similar with early onset ataxia (average 2 years of age), followed by myoclonic seizures at the average age of 6.5 years. Patients developed multiple seizure types, including generalized tonic clonic seizures, absence seizures and drop attacks. All patients developed scoliosis by adolescence, making this an important diagnostic clue. Additional skeletal deformities were present, including pes cavus in four patients and syndactyly in two patients. All patients had elevated serum creatine kinase levels (median 734 IU) in the context of normal muscle biopsies. Electroencephalography revealed pronounced generalized spike and wave discharges with a posterior predominance and photosensitivity in all patients, with focal EEG features seen in seven patients. The disease course showed a relentless decline; patients uniformly became wheelchair bound (mean age 13 years) and four had died during their third or early fourth decade. All 12 cases had the same variant (c.430G>T, G144W) and haplotype analyses confirmed a founder effect. The cases all came from countries bounding the North Sea, extending to the coastal region of Northern Norway. 'North Sea' progressive myoclonus epilepsy has a homogeneous clinical presentation and relentless disease course allowing ready identification from the other progressive myoclonus epilepsies.
    Brain 02/2013; 136(4). DOI:10.1093/brain/awt021 · 10.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Autosomal dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is characterized by predominantly lower limb weakness and wasting, and congenital or early-onset contractures of the hip, knee and ankle. Mutations in TRPV4, encoding a cation channel, have recently been identified in one large dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy kindred, but the genetic basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy in many families remains unknown. It has been hypothesized that differences in the timing and site of anterior horn cell loss in the central nervous system account for the variations in clinical phenotype between different forms of spinal muscular atrophy, but there has been a lack of neuropathological data to support this concept in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. We report clinical, electrophysiology, muscle magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology findings in a four generation family with typical dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy features, without mutations in TRPV4, and in whom linkage to other known dominant neuropathy and spinal muscular atrophy genes has been excluded. The autopsy findings in the proband, who died at 14 months of age from an unrelated illness, provided a rare opportunity to study the neuropathological basis of dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy. There was a reduction in anterior horn cell number in the lumbar and, to a lesser degree, the cervical spinal cord, and atrophy of the ventral nerve roots at these levels, in the absence of additional peripheral nerve pathology or abnormalities elsewhere along the neuraxis. Despite the young age of the child at the time of autopsy, there was no pathological evidence of ongoing loss or degeneration of anterior horn cells suggesting that anterior horn cell loss in dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy occurs in early life, and is largely complete by the end of infancy. These findings confirm that dominant congenital spinal muscular atrophy is a true form of spinal muscular atrophy caused by a loss of anterior horn cells localized to lumbar and cervical regions early in development.
    Brain 06/2012; 135(Pt 6):1714-23. DOI:10.1093/brain/aws108 · 10.23 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: The progressive myoclonus epilepsies (PMEs) are a group of predominantly recessive disorders that present with action myoclonus, tonic-clonic seizures, and progressive neurological decline. Many PMEs have similar clinical presentations yet are genetically heterogeneous, making accurate diagnosis difficult. A locus for PME was mapped in a consanguineous family with a single affected individual to chromosome 17q21. An identical-by-descent, homozygous mutation in GOSR2 (c.430G>T, p.Gly144Trp), a Golgi vesicle transport gene, was identified in this patient and in four apparently unrelated individuals. A comparison of the phenotypes in these patients defined a clinically distinct PME syndrome characterized by early-onset ataxia, action myoclonus by age 6, scoliosis, and mildly elevated serum creatine kinase. This p.Gly144Trp mutation is equivalent to a loss of function and results in failure of GOSR2 protein to localize to the cis-Golgi.
    The American Journal of Human Genetics 05/2011; 88(5):657-63. DOI:10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.04.011 · 10.99 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: To determine the cause of autosomal dominant hearing loss segregating in an American family. Family study. Otologic and audiometric examination was performed on affected family members. Genome wide parametric multipoint linkage mapping using a dominant model was performed with Affymetrix 50K GeneChip data. Direct sequencing was used to confirm the causative mutation. In American family 467, segregating autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss, a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.362T>C; p.F121S) was identified in the COCH gene. This mutation was also associated with vestibular dysfunction typical of other DFNA9 families. However, affected family members also exhibited memory loss and night blindness. The novel COCH mutation affects the functionally important limulus factor C, Coch-5b2 and Lgl1 domain where most DFNA9 mutations have been localized. The onset of the hearing loss, in the 2nd or 3rd decade of life, is earlier than in most DFNA9 families. The progression of hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction in the American family is typical of other DFNA9 families with mutations in this domain. Memory loss and night blindness have not been previously reported in DFNA9 families.
    The Laryngoscope 12/2010; 120(12):2489-93. DOI:10.1002/lary.21159 · 2.03 Impact Factor

Publication Stats

48 Citations
49.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2014
    • University of Melbourne
      • Department of Mathematics and Statistics
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • 2010–2014
    • The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research
      • Division of Bioinformatics
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia